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Discussion So why do I get the feeling that most everybody hates TRUMP?

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kage69

Lifer
Jul 17, 2003
17,276
7,472
136
Sure there are people who still like that bloated dipshit. Putin for starters, and about 35% of the country that refuses to get news from sources that aren't Fox or talk radio.

The hold the GOP has on some low information voters would remain intact even if Trump was literally caught on the phone taking orders from Putin. The psychosis is permanent I'm afraid.

People who have historically had nothing to do with politics, who used 2016 as an example of why, THOSE people can't stand Trump now! 2018 was a real kick in the nuts for dipshit, in 2020 he's going to catch it in the teeth.
 

cytg111

Lifer
Mar 17, 2008
15,211
5,296
136
I cant vote in your elections but I want Trump gone cause our way of living hangs in the balance... Populist Authoritarian Oppertunists stands at the ready to take control over what you got.. What we got.. I just think that would be a shame... thats all.
We can pave the path forward for the planet with free people free elections and democracies that will eventually unite in some kind of union... Has PEACE in Europe taught you nothing? Its doable. It canbe done. Now spread the word damnit... OR give it all up to Vlad-guy and gang and just walk quietly into that dark knight. Embrace that MAGA Cap, as you would a double barrel shoutgun in your mouth... fondle the balls a little then pull the trigger.
 

HeXen

Diamond Member
Dec 13, 2009
7,814
30
91
Most of the non-haters like me just don't care enough to be vocal about it simply because he's already the man so why preach on as if he wasn't? Socially he gets a rise out of people much in the similar ways that most shock people like Marylin Manson, Madonna, etc have done in the past. Their behavior, words or whichever gets that shock value from people that usually only serve to increase their power, wealth or whichever the narrative is. But that doesn't make his decisions bad or not well meaning because frankly we have a good economy right now. The trade deals really did need to happen for our own benefit as did a new Tax reform and I honestly don't think Hilary or any of the other previous candidates would have had the balls to touch those because they stir up the very same sediment that Trump did which is what they feared more than the actual beneficial outcome. Many of the deals we have with other countries are simply just not fair for us and no single person with a brain would ever trade a Harley Davidson for a handshake and a cigarette. I mean we give millions of dollars worth of tanks, guns, etc to Egypt in exchange for some "say so" in how their military operates and while that alone is fine as far as security and allies go, there is nothing that stops them from selling some of that to non-allied forces or doing anything else shady or corrupt and exploiting us for our technology and China treats us far worse as far as trades go so hopefully we can at least have a better deal than what we had but overall I think Trump means well as far as the direction for continual prosperity and power goes.
Naturally what I said will fuel some deep rooted anger in non-Trump supporters and I don't give a crap how it made anyone feel but the point is we do need more politicians that are not afraid of hurting someone's feelings and focus on trying to keep America on top instead of playing a yes man to foreign leaders just to turn their frowns upside down.
 

jackstar7

Lifer
Jun 26, 2009
11,679
1,941
126
Most of the non-haters like me just don't care enough to be vocal about it simply because he's already the man so why preach on as if he wasn't? Socially he gets a rise out of people much in the similar ways that most shock people like Marylin Manson, Madonna, etc have done in the past. Their behavior, words or whichever gets that shock value from people that usually only serve to increase their power, wealth or whichever the narrative is. But that doesn't make his decisions bad or not well meaning because frankly we have a good economy right now. The trade deals really did need to happen for our own benefit as did a new Tax reform and I honestly don't think Hilary or any of the other previous candidates would have had the balls to touch those because they stir up the very same sediment that Trump did which is what they feared more than the actual beneficial outcome. Many of the deals we have with other countries are simply just not fair for us and no single person with a brain would ever trade a Harley Davidson for a handshake and a cigarette. I mean we give millions of dollars worth of tanks, guns, etc to Egypt in exchange for some "say so" in how their military operates and while that alone is fine as far as security and allies go, there is nothing that stops them from selling some of that to non-allied forces or doing anything else shady or corrupt and exploiting us for our technology and China treats us far worse as far as trades go so hopefully we can at least have a better deal than what we had but overall I think Trump means well as far as the direction for continual prosperity and power goes.
Naturally what I said will fuel some deep rooted anger in non-Trump supporters and I don't give a crap how it made anyone feel but the point is we do need more politicians that are not afraid of hurting someone's feelings and focus on trying to keep America on top instead of playing a yes man to foreign leaders just to turn their frowns upside down.
You know... like when Marilyn Manson had nuclear codes.

Because what's context, right?
 

Jhhnn

No Lifer
Nov 11, 1999
61,669
13,747
136
You know... like when Marilyn Manson had nuclear codes.

Because what's context, right?
Fluffers gonna fluff. The new trade deals haven't even gone into effect & the economy is on the same trajectory as the last 8 years or so, other than some getting kicked in the nuts by tariffs.

Meanwhile, fuck the dreamers & the TPS refugees. Fuck Canada, Mexico, Iran & the EU. Fuck the DoJ & the FBI. Fuck the EPA & financial regulations. Fuck the farmers. Fuck healthcare. Fuck infrastructure. Fuck the poors. Fuck 'em all. For the MAGA.
 

Jaskalas

Lifer
Jun 23, 2004
29,807
3,324
126
I think to you the Dema seem far left, but that is because the GOP took it to the extreme right. It’s a visual thing all while the Dem is right where it’s always been (for the most part). In my opinion as a party they need to skew more left and less middle, but that could just be me.
The Affordable Care Act is all we need to know about the position of political parties in this nation.
  • Republican think tanks proposed an equal scheme in the 1990s.
  • A Republican Governor signed it into state law in the 2000s.
  • Democrats championed it by 2009.
The Republican campaign against it was... fascinating by comparison. Democrats moved hard right on healthcare, Republicans took the opportunity to... stake out new territory by saying "FYGM" as their actual policy. And the late Senator McCain is the only reason that effort fell short. Yet the damage is done, the ACA was far from a full fledged solution, giving Republicans room to undermine it.

And now the Republican solution to healthcare is literally "Are you rich?"
Their position could not be more extreme.
 

BoomerD

No Lifer
Feb 26, 2006
56,338
4,759
126
Never have, never will...but I don't think the Dems have fielded a candidate yet that stands a snowball's chance in hell of beating Trump.
 

yllus

Elite Member & Lifer
Aug 20, 2000
20,583
430
126
Depends on who the Democrats nominate and what happens to Trump. If Trump goes down before 2020, I would welcome someone like Charlie Baker or even Mitt Romney pulling the GOP back to the center, and would consider them if they were successful in doing so.
I genuinely don't understand this position. Is it not abundantly obvious that Romney is not a centrist? He was willing to throw away his landmark achievement as governor (healthcare for everyone) in his hunger for power and would assuredly have championed and instituted the same tax cuts that Trump helped bull through your Congress. He'd absolutely engage in the same race-baiting tactics the Republicans are turning into their cornerstone issue, too, if it meant a few more votes going his way. He is Trump's equal when it comes to policies.
 
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soundforbjt

Lifer
Feb 15, 2002
16,107
3,719
136
Never have, never will...but I don't think the Dems have fielded a candidate yet that stands a snowball's chance in hell of beating Trump.
You really think those 70,000 to 80.000 people across those three states still back him? What has he done for them?
 

ondma

Golden Member
Mar 18, 2018
1,945
666
106
Fluffers gonna fluff. The new trade deals haven't even gone into effect & the economy is on the same trajectory as the last 8 years or so, other than some getting kicked in the nuts by tariffs.

Meanwhile, fuck the dreamers & the TPS refugees. Fuck Canada, Mexico, Iran & the EU. Fuck the DoJ & the FBI. Fuck the EPA & financial regulations. Fuck the farmers. Fuck healthcare. Fuck infrastructure. Fuck the poors. Fuck 'em all. For the MAGA.
Yea, Trump inherited a good economy, and his handling has been "masterful" at least from his point of view. He is handling it much like a credit card. Tax cuts (mainly for the rich) and gutting environmental regulatio
Bernie Sanders.
They shafted him in their primaries and gave us somebody he tore into relentlessly.
Unfortunately, I dont think he will win the democratic nomination, and an independent probably has no chance.
 

cytg111

Lifer
Mar 17, 2008
15,211
5,296
136
I genuinely don't understand this position. Is it not abundantly obvious that Romney is not a centrist? He was willing to throw away his landmark achievement as governor (healthcare for everyone) in his hunger for power and would assuredly have championed and instituted the same tax cuts that Trump helped bull through your Congress. He'd absolutely engage in the same race-baiting tactics the Republicans are turning into their cornerstone issue, too, if it meant a few more votes going his way. He is Trump's equal when it comes to policies.
Except on NATO, Iran, SA... oh yea and on Russia... Oh yea and he might just know how to make a deal.. unlike you know who!
 

yllus

Elite Member & Lifer
Aug 20, 2000
20,583
430
126
Except on NATO, Iran, SA... oh yea and on Russia... Oh yea and he might just know how to make a deal.. unlike you know who!
The possibility that President Romney wouldn't be a complete lunatic who'd throw away 80 years of international cooperation and diplomacy is hardly a point in his favour. My starting point, even for Republicans, is that they not be lunatics. The issue is he'd hurt America just as much as [INSERT REPUBLICAN HERE]. The Republican platform is the issue.
 
Feb 16, 2005
13,754
4,728
136
well he did lose the popular vote, and by a fairly wide margin, so that should be clue #1 why you feel that way.
also, he's a walking, talking shitbag of a human who has rarely if ever put someone else's needs ahead of his own.
seriously though, there's a long, long list of reasons as to why people hate that bloated orange fucktard, probably going to have start digging sometime around his college years I suspect.
 

Thump553

Lifer
Jun 2, 2000
11,811
1,129
126
Given my age, race, gender, profession and most other factors I should be a solid Republican. The GOP totally turned me off in the 90's with their mutliple witchhunts on Bill Clinton and ultimately impeaching him for a hummer. I have never voted GOP for any office (outside of people in town or state government that I knew personally and liked) since that impeachment.

The GOP has totally abandoned what was their core issue for over one hundred years-fiscal responsibility. Heck two months ago a major argument of GOP politicians (and GOP supporters here) was that five BILLION dollars was a pittance to waste to assuage the ego of our child-President. I'm self employed so I'm a whole lot more aware than most of the necessity of conservative economic behavior.

The big issue is nonvoters. That was almost 43% of eligible voters in 2016-larger than either the Dems or the GOP. The Dems have to stop trying to compromise with the GOP all the time and instead insist on two things: (1) their inclusive open tent and (2) supporting a truly separate and viable agenda.
 

1prophet

Diamond Member
Aug 17, 2005
5,237
472
126
you are making this about me when this is a discussion..
But since you posted what you posted are you saying your a TRUMP supporter??
Let me say I am seeking nobody to affirm what I believe to be true -- here this sums it up pretty good --
View attachment 3824
View attachment 3824

How about the fact that Obama got elected due to a populist message that beat out both Corporate Clinton and McCain but then turned around and did the bidding of Wall Street and bankers to the detriment of main street who got him elected in the first place setting up the environment for someone like Trump to become president.
https://www.usatoday.com/story/money/columnist/2015/08/18/delamaide-obama-banks/31939695/
Obama legacy includes banker impunity

WASHINGTON – While it may continue to baffle us how no bankers went to jail in the wake of the financial crisis even as banks paid tens of billions of dollars in fines for wrongdoing, there is very little mystery to it.

The three government officials most responsible for the failure to bring any top banker to trial for widespread fraud – former Treasury Secretary Timothy Geithner, former Attorney General Eric Holder, and former DOJ official Lanny Breuer – are all now making millions of dollars a year in Wall Street-related jobs.

Is it really that simple? Sadly, yes.

There has been a lot of talk about how fragile the system was in 2008 and how an indictment might have tipped the public into full-fledged panic – the argument that came to be known as "too big to jail" – but that is really just so much talk.

Those who resist the reality of Washington's revolving door don't want to think that for all its size and sophistication, this country still has much in common with a banana republic – a country where money buys political clout and puts people above the law.

As President Barack Obama burnishes his political legacy and lays the plans for a billion-dollar monument to himself, it is important to remember some of the administration's failures, and this is one of them. Ultimately, the responsibility for this dereliction of duty lies with him.

The legacy of this failure is a gigantic moral hazard. Bankers used to take it on faith that they were immune to prosecution. Now they know it is a fact, and that will embolden them in the future to once again violate the law with impunity.

Whatever benefit might come from the Dodd-Frank financial reform in forcing banks to retrench and downsize pales when compared to this ongoing risk.


Some of the bank executives who presided over the wholesale fleecing of their customers are still in office. JPMorgan Chase CEO Jamie Dimon still acts as though he is the country's top banker even though his institution has paid billions to settle investigations into wrongdoing.

Other top executives who regulators or shareholders would no longer allow to stay in office nonetheless went on to comfortable retirements in their mansions and yachts with the millions in excessive compensation they had already collected.

William Cohan, a former JPMorgan managing director who has become a persistent bank critic, recently noted that the window for bringing bankers to account for the fraudulent actions that led to the financial crisis has just about closed, but Holder's successor, Loretta Lynch, seems more interested in pursuing soccer officials in Switzerland than bankers on Wall Street.

"It seems an apt time to ask," Cohan wrote in the current issue of The Atlantic, "in the biggest picture, what justice has been achieved?"

Some 49 institutions have paid out $190 billion in fines, restitutions and lawsuits, he notes, but this money comes from the banks' shareholders, not the bankers themselves.

Only one individual banker, a senior trader at Credit Suisse, was sentenced to jail for inflating the value of mortgage bonds in his trading portfolio, Cohan says. After the savings and loan crisis in the 1980s, he adds, more than a thousand bankers were put in jail.

Cohan traces this lack of action back to a memo written by Holder in 1999, when he was deputy attorney general in the Clinton administration.

The memo, which set out what came to be known as the Holder Doctrine, warned of the danger of prosecuting big banks because of possible "collateral consequences." (Holder went on to work for the corporate law firm of Covington & Burling in 2001 and now has returned there.)

In 2012, Lanny Breuer, then head of the DOJ's criminal division, echoed this doctrine when he said he felt obliged to consider the health of the company and the financial markets overall in deciding whether to pursue criminal indictments. (Breuer worked at Covington & Burling prior to his stint in public service and now has returned to the firm as vice chairman.)

A nationwide probe belatedly launched that same year, after the statute of limitations for criminal prosecutions had passed, largely served the purpose of gathering information for the big headline fines of institutions, Cohan says.

In one case at least, JPMorgan's $13 billion settlement with the DOJ in 2013, the deal included suppression of a whistleblower's deposition that did indeed point to individuals within the bank, he says.

The modus operandi was similar in actions against Citigroup, Bank of America and other Wall Street firms, he says. As Wall Street critic Matt Taibbi of Rolling Stone recently noted, these back room agreements were concluded in secret without any judge signing off on them.

"Without holding real people on Wall Street accountable for their wrongdoing in the years leading up to the financial crisis, the message that their behavior was unacceptable goes undelivered," Cohan concludes. "Instead a very different message is being sent: for financiers, justice is just a check someone else has to write."

Mystery solved. Let the legacy begin.
And of course let's not forget how he used lies and deception to get Obamacare to pass
Obamacare Architect: Yeah, We Lied to The "Stupid" American People to Get It Passed



"You can't do it political, you just literally cannot do it. Transparent financing and also transparent spending. I mean, this bill was written in a tortured way to make sure CBO did not score the mandate as taxes. If CBO scored the mandate as taxes the bill dies. Okay? So it’s written to do that," Gruber said. "In terms of risk rated subsidies, if you had a law which said that healthy people are going to pay in, you made explicit healthy people pay in and sick people get money, it would not have passed. Lack of transparency is a huge political advantage. And basically, call it the stupidity of the American voter or whatever, but basically that was really really critical to get for the thing to pass. Look, I wish Mark was right that we could make it all transparent, but I’d rather have this law than not."
Democrats and their party leaders may not have voted for the dumpster fire known as Trump, but they did more than their fair share of providing the gasoline and matches.
 
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Jhhnn

No Lifer
Nov 11, 1999
61,669
13,747
136
View attachment 3824

How about the fact that Obama got elected due to a populist message that beat out both Corporate Clinton and McCain but then turned around and did the bidding of Wall Street and bankers to the detriment of main street who got him elected in the first place setting up the environment for someone like Trump to become president.
https://www.usatoday.com/story/money/columnist/2015/08/18/delamaide-obama-banks/31939695/
Obama legacy includes banker impunity



And of course let's not forget how he used lies and deception to get Obamacare to pass
Obamacare Architect: Yeah, We Lied to The "Stupid" American People to Get It Passed





Democrats and their party leaders may not have voted for the dumpster fire known as Trump, but they did more than their fair share of providing the gasoline and matches.
Gawd. Trump is nobody's fault but the people who voted for him. It was obvious that Trump was a liar, a cheat, a thief & a con artiste 30 fucking years ago. And they bought into the con anyway.
 

tweaker2

Lifer
Aug 5, 2000
11,855
3,081
136
Gawd. Trump is nobody's fault but the people who voted for him. It was obvious that Trump was a liar, a cheat, a thief & a con artiste 30 fucking years ago. And they bought into the con anyway.
It's like those folks went and bought a lemon clunker, found out later that the crankshaft blew out the side of the engine and won't admit that they got scammed so they'd rather push the wreck around the block and into town trailing gritty dirty brown oil behind them while proudly proclaiming what a cool spiffy ride they got for a deal nobody could resist.
 

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