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So my 9800GX2 seems to be dying...

RRM2010

Junior Member
Feb 14, 2010
3
0
0
So, for a few weeks I've had problems when trying to play games. Some of them like GTA IV, crash almost inmediately, COD 4 and MW can be played for a while before they crash, The Witcher sometimes plays perfectly but sometimes won't even start, etc.

I think my PSU is fine, and it surely is not a software issue since I reformatted my PC and installed the newest drivers. The computer's case is now open to allow better airflow, and I checked all the fans, they work fine. Most likely my video card is failing (an overcloked EVGA 9800GX2).

So, I need a new video card but I've been out of the loop in regards to hardware for a year and a half. My mobo is a Gigabyte P35 DSL3, my CPU is a E8400 at 3GHz, I have 4 gigs of ram, and this is my PSU. My desktop has a 1680x1050 resolution.

Is the ATI 5870 a good option? Would there be bottlenecks in my system? My PSU yields enough power?

Thanks in advance
 

Mr. Pedantic

Diamond Member
Feb 14, 2010
5,039
0
76
I would go for a 5850 at most. At that resolution you most likely won't be needing anything more. You probably won't see that much improvement in pure frame rates, but it should be a heck of a lot smoother.

And overclock that CPU!
 

toyota

Lifer
Apr 15, 2001
12,957
1
0
yeah 5850 at most for that res and even then you need to oc that cpu for games like GTA 4.
 

faxon

Platinum Member
May 23, 2008
2,109
1
81
overclock your CPU and get a 5850. GTA4 easily populates a quad up to a considerable load, and the 5850 is a good match to such a CPU. your E8400 has half that compute power, and it will probably be taxed. still, it's a good CPU, and it wouldnt be a significant bottleneck in anything but the newest games
 

RRM2010

Junior Member
Feb 14, 2010
3
0
0
Al right, thanks. I'm a bit nervous about overclocking my CPU but I'll give it a try
 

MrK6

Diamond Member
Aug 9, 2004
4,458
3
81
Before you order a new card, easy bake that sucker:
http://www.hardforum.com/showthread.php?t=1421792

Honestly, it works, and what do you have to lose anyway? Just make sure you follow the instructions and remove all plastic parts before putting it in the oven.

That said, should the baking not work, a 5850 will hold you for a long time at 1680x1050. And, as mentioned, a few extra hundred MHz on your more than capable CPU wouldn't hurt either :).
 

Athadeus

Senior member
Feb 29, 2004
587
0
71
You can try starting with small overclocks first and then increase it. It is a lot easier to get a system to +20% stable than 50%. I started with 10% on previous systems and am up to a 50% overclock on my current system years later.

Make sure to use driver cleaner after doing the regular driver uninstallation, or reinstall windows again before making the switch too.
 

ahenkel

Diamond Member
Jan 11, 2009
5,359
3
81
Before you order a new card, easy bake that sucker:
Another vote for baked video card. It worked with my friends 8500gt. If they card is garbage bound anyways might as well give it a shot.
 

toyota

Lifer
Apr 15, 2001
12,957
1
0
Al right, thanks. I'm a bit nervous about overclocking my CPU but I'll give it a try
it should go right to 3.6 with problem. just do the memory at 1:1 if you have DDR2 800 and run the cpu at 9 x 400. you might not even have to change any voltage for that.
 

RRM2010

Junior Member
Feb 14, 2010
3
0
0
All right, another question. My mobo has a PCI-e x16 slot, but the newer cards are designed for PCI-e x16 V2.0. I know they're compatible but I wonder if this could cause any noticeable bottlenecks?
 

CurseTheSky

Diamond Member
Oct 21, 2006
5,401
1
0
I just took a dead (well, artifacts everywhere) 8800 GTX last night, took the heatsink off, cleaned off all of the thermal residue, and baked it in the oven at 400F for 10 minutes. After letting it cool for 20-30 minutes, I reapplied thermal material, popped the heatsink back on, and powered it up.

It's been in my brother's computer ever sense, and already saw ~4-6 hours of gaming (hey, can you blame him? It was an upgrade from a 7900 GS... :p). Works great.
 

ExcaliburMM

Senior member
Jan 24, 2009
606
2
81
www.Staredit.net
I just took a dead (well, artifacts everywhere) 8800 GTX last night, took the heatsink off, cleaned off all of the thermal residue, and baked it in the oven at 400F for 10 minutes. After letting it cool for 20-30 minutes, I reapplied thermal material, popped the heatsink back on, and powered it up.

It's been in my brother's computer ever sense, and already saw ~4-6 hours of gaming (hey, can you blame him? It was an upgrade from a 7900 GS... :p). Works great.
If this isn't trolling, why exactly does this work? What does baking a gfx do? o_O
 

CurseTheSky

Diamond Member
Oct 21, 2006
5,401
1
0
If this isn't trolling, why exactly does this work? What does baking a gfx do? o_O
It's not trolling, it's 100% real. YMMV of course, but it worked for tons of people. Check out YouTube.

From what I gather, microfissures (tiny cracks) develop in the solder that holds the GPU to the board, or connects other components. Eventually the components disconnect from the board, or worse, short against other components. Putting it in the oven apparently remelts some of the solder, which fixes the tiny cracks.

I don't know what kind of longevity it'll add to the card, but the fact that it works at all is amazing. I was skeptical at first, but having done it myself now I know that dead GPUs aren't necessarily dead for good...
 
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