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Question [Snake oil or not ?] "Go Chiller" fluid, 7°C Cooler? This must be a scam

Det0x

Senior member
Sep 11, 2014
553
795
136
As title say, snake oil or not ?
Really sounds too good to be true, but the very limited results from LLT seems promising..

Fluff from their own site:
"secret sauce"
"performance"

Have been searching for more/other reviews, but cant seem to find any.
Seems pretty expensive.. What do you guys think ?
 

dlerious

Senior member
Mar 4, 2004
999
256
136
I'll wait until someone runs it for 6 months or so to see if it still performs the same over time and I see what things look like build-up and stain wise. Probably still pass though.
 
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Det0x

Senior member
Sep 11, 2014
553
795
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I'll wait until someone runs it for 6 months or so to see if it still performs the same over time and I see what things look like build-up and stain wise. Probably still pass though.
Well i agree with you, its better to wait and see to be on the safe side..

But if this 3-7 degrees difference is real, this HUGE news in the watercooling world :cool:

Maybe i'm gullible and throwing money out the window, but i did order some of that fluid.. Just hope i can find some better reviews /testing before i try to use it myself :) (dont want to ruin my watercooling setup if there are bad longtime effects by running this fluid)
 

dlerious

Senior member
Mar 4, 2004
999
256
136
He was talking about 3-4 degrees with the open bench setup. I don't remember hearing what the results were for the 1st system. I also don't know if he mentioned how he tested or if he just let the computer idle for half an hour.
 

Justinus

Platinum Member
Oct 10, 2005
2,748
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Getting tired of seeing all these new products with graphene added and miracle claims.
 

aigomorla

Cases and Cooling Mod PC Gaming Mod Elite Member
Super Moderator
Sep 28, 2005
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graphene is hydrophobic in nature.. (continue reading the article)
.
Graphite and Graphene are considered to be hydrophobic materials - which means that they repel water. However, according to a new research performed at the University of Pittsburgh, it turns out that those materials are actually hydrophilic - attract to water. They say that when graphene is exposed to air, a thin layer of hydrocarbon (a compound made entirely of hydrogen and carbon) contaminates its surface and makes it hydrophobic.
As the article states it requires the molecule to never get in contact with air... well, GG, you guys also know what bleeding is right?


OCZ Tony experimented heavily on graphene as a magic heat sink material, results... its horrible in liquid cooling, hence why we never got graphene waterblocks even tho OCZ spent a LOT of money trying to take one.

They tried very hard... but ultimately it was a can of fail.


As title say, snake oil or not ?
Really sounds too good to be true, but the very limited results from LLT seems promising..
SIgh... Linus should of known better.
He was around XS when OCZ Tony was running around with 2389403849 liquid cooling tests.
If graphene was so special, Swiftech, Primochill, eK, Mayhem, even Koolance would of made it already.
 
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KentState

Diamond Member
Oct 19, 2001
8,158
316
126
Interested in trying it depending on how it holds up over time. If anything, I like how it looks and carbon shouldn't break down like the other pigments that are used to color coolant. The cost isn't really a concern if it's safe considering the system it's going in costs $5k + anyways.
 

Furious_Styles

Senior member
Jan 17, 2019
406
138
86
Well i agree with you, its better to wait and see to be on the safe side..

But if this 3-7 degrees difference is real, this HUGE news in the watercooling world :cool:

Maybe i'm gullible and throwing money out the window, but i did order some of that fluid.. Just hope i can find some better reviews /testing before i try to use it myself :) (dont want to ruin my watercooling setup if there are bad longtime effects by running this fluid)
You will have to let us all know if the marketing matches the results.
 

Micrornd

Golden Member
Mar 2, 2013
1,187
140
106
OCZ Tony experimented heavily on graphene as a magic heat sink material, results... its horrible in liquid cooling, hence why we never got graphene waterblocks even tho OCZ spent a LOT of money trying to take one.

They tried very hard... but ultimately it was a can of fail.
And 15 Inventors "invented" the light bulb before Edison made it actually work on a practical basis.
Proof is in the real world testing.
Can we all agree on that?
 

JEDIYoda

Lifer
Jul 13, 2005
33,783
3,191
126
Well i agree with you, its better to wait and see to be on the safe side..

But if this 3-7 degrees difference is real, this HUGE news in the watercooling world :cool:

Maybe i'm gullible and throwing money out the window, but i did order some of that fluid.. Just hope i can find some better reviews /testing before i try to use it myself :) (dont want to ruin my watercooling setup if there are bad longtime effects by running this fluid)
No it is not huge news at all!! what do you believe to be the advantages oi 3-7 degrees difference? Besides the obvious...its cooler! In reality that is the only difference!
 

Det0x

Senior member
Sep 11, 2014
553
795
136
No it is not huge news at all!! what do you believe to be the advantages oi 3-7 degrees difference? Besides the obvious...its cooler! In reality that is the only difference!
Well, you could see my last post on this forum and understand that we seem to have very different use case for our computers..

But even then, you don't seem to know how newer cpu architectures behave.. Even at stock settings, lower temperature mean higher boosting, and this is especially true for Zen3, so yeah.. 3-7 degrees from different cooling fluid alone would be huge.
 
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JEDIYoda

Lifer
Jul 13, 2005
33,783
3,191
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Well, you could see my last post on this forum and understand that we seem to have very different use case for our computers..

But even then, you don't seem to know how newer cpu architectures behave.. Even at stock settings, lower temperature mean higher boosting, and this is especially true for Zen3, so yeah.. 3-7 degrees from different cooling fluid alone would be huge.
nope!!! sorry!! You are over thinking this.......of course high temperatures are bad......well duh! But if your having cooling issues with your water set up....I would bet it has nothing to do with the fluids or additive! But if you are doing it properly there comes a point of diminishing returns...no matter the application!
 

aigomorla

Cases and Cooling Mod PC Gaming Mod Elite Member
Super Moderator
Sep 28, 2005
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And 15 Inventors "invented" the light bulb before Edison made it actually work on a practical basis.
Proof is in the real world testing.
Can we all agree on that?
yeah but those 15 inventors were not fighting against the laws of thermodynamics and physics.

Its a close to impossible battle when you go against those.
Unless you somehow discover unobtainium, or somehow manage to unlock mana / chi, and pull magic or some form of wushu martial arts into the mix.
 
Feb 4, 2009
31,483
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Will someone please get this goop and try it out, I need to know even though I have an AIO and would never be able to change the fluid.
Every time I browse AT I see this thread and think hmmm, I wonder....
 
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Stuka87

Diamond Member
Dec 10, 2010
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nope!!! sorry!! You are over thinking this.......of course high temperatures are bad......well duh! But if your having cooling issues with your water set up....I would bet it has nothing to do with the fluids or additive! But if you are doing it properly there comes a point of diminishing returns...no matter the application!
I don't think you understand what is being said. This has nothing to do with a loop having "high" temps. Its that current generation CPU boosting is based off CPU core temps. If you can drop those temps 3-7C, the CPU will dynamically clock higher, and in some cases, quite a bit higher.
 

aigomorla

Cases and Cooling Mod PC Gaming Mod Elite Member
Super Moderator
Sep 28, 2005
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But if you are doing it properly there comes a point of diminishing returns...no matter the application!
the returns flatten out like a (1/ln x) graph where the bottom peak is @ ambient temp and fluid can never go lower then ambient temp, if you remember how those look in math.

It gets really really bad the more and more you have, and eventually you can drop in like 10000000000000 dollars, and it will only net you like .00000000000000000000002C (being extreme here) but, at one point, you need to go into phase changing fluids, like a chiller, to get break that adamantium wall known as ambient.
 
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JEDIYoda

Lifer
Jul 13, 2005
33,783
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I don't think you understand what is being said. This has nothing to do with a loop having "high" temps. Its that current generation CPU boosting is based off CPU core temps. If you can drop those temps 3-7C, the CPU will dynamically clock higher, and in some cases, quite a bit higher.
oh I understand very well! But the issue is as Algo stated in this next thread.....
My point is you are talking about something that even you admit iis hypothetical or you would not have used the words --- if you can......and in some cases.......
IMO there comes a point when you can try all you want to do things on the cheap side when to it properly you need to keep dropping more and more $$$$$$$$......

the returns flatten out like a (1/ln x) graph where the bottom peak is @ ambient temp and fluid can never go lower then ambient temp, if you remember how those look in math.

It gets really really bad the more and more you have, and eventually you can drop in like 10000000000000 dollars, and it will only net you like .00000000000000000000002C (being extreme here) but, at one point, you need to go into phase changing fluids, like a chiller, to get break that adamantium wall known as ambient.
 

michaeldancurtis

Junior Member
Sep 25, 2021
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Well guys, I couldn't help it, the stuff looks cool...... so I bought 3 liters of it and will keep yall updated. Keep in mind I won't be testing it for its cooling abilities.... because believing that it would make a significant difference would mean that I wasted a physics degree, but I like the look of it and DO hope it won't stain or clog as bad as some of the other solids/pigments..... we shall see
 

aigomorla

Cases and Cooling Mod PC Gaming Mod Elite Member
Super Moderator
Sep 28, 2005
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I wasted a physics degree
You should know the 3 princple laws of thermo.

1. you can not cheat in the game. (conservation)
2. you must play the game. (entropy)
3. you can never win in the game. (0)

because the claims are breaking a lot of rules of thermo from what i see, over plain distilled water.

I am very against premixes, and additives.
I only use them when i have to use a questionable Chinese fitting or part as i can not guarantee that all wetted parts will be brass/copper.
But otherwise unless you have a poor nickle plating job block, i usually always push distilled + silver kill coil.
Remove coil if you have nickle, as the silver can react with the nickle over time.

I also like to flush my system at least once every 6 months, like a oil change, to keep coolant fresh, and see if i have any discoloration from possible corrosion.

Premixes would kill that, as its not recommended to recycle coolant because you can pick up contaminants.
 
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michaeldancurtis

Junior Member
Sep 25, 2021
2
0
6
You should know the 3 princple laws of thermo.

1. you can not cheat in the game. (conservation)
2. you must play the game. (entropy)
3. you can never win in the game. (0)

because the claims are breaking a lot of rules of thermo from what i see, over plain distilled water.

I am very against premixes, and additives.
I only use them when i have to use a questionable Chinese fitting or part as i can not guarantee that all wetted parts will be brass/copper.
But otherwise unless you have a poor nickle plating job block, i usually always push distilled + silver kill coil.
Remove coil if you have nickle, as the silver can react with the nickle over time.

I also like to flush my system at least once every 6 months, like a oil change, to keep coolant fresh, and see if i have any discoloration from possible corrosion.

Premixes would kill that, as its not recommended to recycle coolant because you can pick up contaminants.
Let me repeat, for the liberal arts majors that find complex sentences hard. " I won't be testing it for its cooling abilities...." it will likely cool about as good as water.
I do however think it MAY prove to be good at not staining tubes.... we shall see.

I understand your position on water with pretty colors.... and I can respect that, but since CPUs and GPUs thermal throttle, the worst danger is damaged water-cooling loop.....

.... for me, its worth the risk for the pretty colors. And I ALWAYS have Nickel because its shiny .... I even use ...... BLACK Nickel.. I know I know... but I'm a rebel.

The bolded (by me) sentence above is not allowed (nor needed) in the tech forums. We do not any personal insults/attacks amongst users.

Please read the posting guidelines before posting again.
https://forums.anandtech.com/threads/anandtech-forum-guidelines.60552/

AT Mod Usandthem
 
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