Sleep mode resets my OC

lousydood

Member
Aug 1, 2005
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I've done a preliminary OC pushing the FSB to 1333 which raises the CPU to 3GHz. Everything seems pretty stable, as expected. Now, Vista puts my computer into sleep mode after about 2 hours of inactivity. I find this to be a useful power-saving setting, so I would like to keep it if possible. However, I've discovered that Rightmark reports my core clock reset back to 2.4GHz after waking the computer. I presume the computer is "rebooting" in some sort of BIOS-defaults mode when waking up. I'm not sure why.

Any ideas?
 

videopho

Diamond Member
Apr 8, 2005
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Use cpu-z as another measure just in case Rightmark's reading wasn't a hoax.

BTW, I've stopped using hibernation mode since way back years ago.
 

genec57

Member
Nov 7, 2006
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If I understand corrrectly and rightmark is being used to set your overclock from within windows that is your problem.
Set your OC in cmos and it should stay where it is set.
I have Vista 64 and I use sleep all the time with no problem (or not many :)).
 

Jjoshua2

Senior member
Mar 24, 2006
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I have a similar issue vista x64 asus p5b-e mobo e6300 at 3.3 ghz.
When I hibernate, it goes into hibernation, resets, and then resumes right back into windows. So what I do sometimes is hibernate, then hard shut down.
 

QuixoticOne

Golden Member
Nov 4, 2005
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Thumbs up for using the power saving sleep modes, they make a lot of good
sense to use when you don't need the computer. They save you power/money,
heat, make your PC parts last longer, and save the environment too.

Anyway it's not TOO surprising that the computer would come back up with
different (default in some sense) frequency and voltage values, but you
can probably fix that and still keep sleep and power savings modes wotking.

a) does the PC eventually go into its former overclocked mode after it has
finished waking up and you run a CPU demanding program?

b) Do you set your overclock as manual overrides in the BIOS, or for that matter,
'automatic' overclock modes in the BIOS? If either of these is the case, it seems
like a BIOS bug not to change the VID/FID/ACPI table or whatever so that your
chosen overclock parameters are still applied when the computer goes from
a sleep state to a full power state. Ask for a BIOS fix, if so.

c) do you use a windows program to set new frequency / voltage?
Some windows based overclocking programs basically run once and then they stop
controlling the speed/voltage after they take affect when you run them so if
something ELSE changes the speed/voltage they won't automatically restore
your values.
So typically those kinds of programs need to be manually or automatically
run once again after the PC wakes up so that they'll set the OC values you want
again. Maybe the program is in your auto-start / start up or something;
if so, try just running it manually from the link in the programs menu and
see if it'll set up your OC again. Some programs have an option to keep
running as a service or background / tray program so they can keep applying
the settings over and over again if needed.

d) I'm pretty sure there are different windows based OC control programs
that you can use to keep your favorite OC modes active or accessable.
My friend uses "CrystalCPUID"
though it may have a similar limitation as you describe:
http://crystalmark.info/softwa...stalCPUID/index-e.html
...
Automatic startup with activation of multiplier management.

Set /CQ & /HIDE command line option and put shortcut on Startup. If you would like to get more information, please read ReadMeCpuid.txt.
example
"C:\CrystalCPUID\CrystalCPUID.exe"
-> "C:\CrystalCPUID\CrystalCPUID.exe" /CQ /HIDE

*This feature may not work on Windows Vista.

...but then again maybe they've fixed it by now or have a work-around.

You could probably find a utility that can cause a particular program you choose
to be run every time the computer wakes up.

Or you could certainly find a utility that can just run once every 5 minutes while
the PC is turned on and either way you can have it refresh your OC settings
if needed.

 

lousydood

Member
Aug 1, 2005
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In the BIOS settings, I disable automatic control of the bus freq and set it from "1066" to "1333" (literal values). I do not touch the multiplier as it is locked to 9x (or 6x). Then I reboot and my CPU is operating at 3.0GHz (2.0GHz speedstepped), and seems to be quite stable. I haven't run a long-term test but I've used the computer extensively since. I have RightMark, Speedfan, and cpuz on my system solely for the purpose of monitoring CPU temp (for now).

If I allow my system to hibernate, when it wakes up it is operating at non-OC frequencies according to RightMark, et al. RightMark shows the effective CPU frequency at any moment in time, and it is clearly alternating between 1.6GHz (speedstepped) and 2.4GHz (at load), after waking up.

If I then reboot my system and check the BIOS, it is still set to "1333". However, sometimes it acts a little strange and boots up with 1066 bus freq -- even though the BIOS setting is at 1333. Anyway, it usually boots up 1333 after I verify that it is set properly.

I haven't played with any Windows-based OC software yet.

FWIW I have a Debian Linux partition but I haven't bothered to setup any kind of hibernation for that, so I don't know if it will also reset my OC.
 

videopho

Diamond Member
Apr 8, 2005
4,185
29
91
Lousy-what's your system spec?
It may very well be that your rig runs in Throttle mode after waking up from hibernate.
I've too noticed that with my x2-3800 rig but not with the e6600'rig.
Anyone seeing this too?
 

lousydood

Member
Aug 1, 2005
158
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By spec you mean the specific parts?

e6600, evga 650i ultra, 2gb mushkin pc2 6400, corsair 520hx, freezer 7 pro, antec 900, wd 250gb SATA, vista 64 home premium.
 

VirtualLarry

No Lifer
Aug 25, 2001
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Originally posted by: myocardia
Hibernation only works if you aren't overclocked, unless you happen to be a bear.;)

Sounds like a BIOS bug to me. Why wouldn't hibernation work, even if OCed? All it does is save the data to disk, and then reload it upon bootup.

Part of the problem seems to be that Vista uses a hybrid hibernation + sleep mode, and some BIOSes seem to have issues waking from sleep mode properly.
 

genec57

Member
Nov 7, 2006
135
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I have no problem with retaining bios settings upon recovery from sleep. The problem with my system is that a high percentage of the time the sleep settings are reset to sleep "never". Sometimes my setting will be retained for three or more cycles and then resets itself.
I would love an answer to this one.
 

nullpointerus

Golden Member
Apr 17, 2003
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Originally posted by: myocardia
Originally posted by: VirtualLarry
Originally posted by: myocardia
Hibernation only works if you aren't overclocked, unless you happen to be a bear.;)

Sounds like a BIOS bug to me. Why wouldn't hibernation work, even if OCed? All it does is save the data to disk, and then reload it upon bootup.

Part of the problem seems to be that Vista uses a hybrid hibernation + sleep mode, and some BIOSes seem to have issues waking from sleep mode properly.

While I don't have any experience with Vista, with XP, hibernation only works with overclocking if you aren't overclocking much at all. Here's why: upon waking up, your cpu multiplier will be returned to it's factory setting, which doesn't affect many people, but, your vcore will also be reset to it's stock setting. So, if you've had to raise your vcore any at all, or even if you didn't, you aren't using your processor's stock cpu multiplier, you're screwed.:D

Hmm...that's what I thought was happening to me (even in Vista). I wish there would be some way to reconfigure these startup parameters. The computer simply will not be stable if it's coming out with the stock multiplier and voltage settings with a big FSB o/c.
 

Shinare

Senior member
Feb 3, 2004
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I had a similar problem in Vista x64 that may or may not be related to your problem, but I thought I would throw it out there. My computer was starting into sleep mode fine (save file, monitor would turn off), but the computer would not power off. If I turned off the comptuer via the PSU switch or held in the power button for 8 seconds, when the computer came back on, the BIOS would be reset to default settings, or more frighteningly, the computer would not post at all. In those cases it took two to three tries and one time it took jumping the CMOS reset and on next turn on it asked which of the previous BIOS saves (it had "Defaults" and the last 5 saves I did) I wanted to use to turn on my computer. Very clever option I had no idea was in there.

The problem was not with the computer at all, but rather with vista reacting terribly with microsoft's very own wireless keyboard and mouse receiver. If you have a microsoft wireless receiver that looks like an elongated puck with the three lights on it then you probably have this problem.

I switched to my old logitech wireless setup and the problems magically went away.
 

videopho

Diamond Member
Apr 8, 2005
4,185
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My experience was a nightmare one with a Dell in XP MCE2005 OS, couple of years ago.
One day waking up from hibernate, the Dell just froze and refused to post into window.
After several attempts I ended up do a full disk backup.
Ever since I've vowed that I'd never use this feature anymore.