Silicon Lottery, the $50 "gay-ran-teed" de-lid, and Liquid Ultra

Jun 30, 2004
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#1
I remember participating in IDontCare's De-lidding thread, and followed it here and there. Apparently Coollaboratory Liquid Ultra was a preferred replacement for the Intel TIM.

I thought I saw some disappointments about how CLU cured, how it appeared after a month or two.

Obviously, there had been a prevailing argument against using nano-diamond.

So it seemed the CLU was the preferred solution to putting the IHS back on the processor die.

If anyone did it on their own, was there ever a deterioration in the effectiveness of the CLU? Or is its application essentially permanent until you attempt to de-lid the processor which was de-lidded to put the CLU there in the first place?

I'm thinking to buy my chip from Silicon Lottery and even pay them to do the de-lidding and TIM application of CLU.

I have big plans, and plenty of time to pull the string on Checkouts.
 

24601

Golden Member
Jun 10, 2007
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#2
And people laughed me off the forum for saying that delidding and relidding with CLU was a massively easy business model for basically printing free money.
 
Jun 30, 2004
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#3
Not sure what you mean exactly by that.

I'd rather the S L people pick the CPU and test it for an overclock setting, then delid it for me. They can then assume the responsibility that it will be a good purchase for me.

I don't know if we called Frederick Taylor in here to do time-motion studies for de-lidding. I just know that at this point, I'd rather turn my attention to other factors in the computer build and pay someone to handle that particular item.

So for that, I can shell out fifty clams extra.
 

Sheep221

Golden Member
Oct 28, 2012
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#4
I didn't even know that someone is running business off delidding and selling delidded and overclocked CPUs. :cool:
 
Jun 3, 2011
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#5
$50 isn't much, imho worth it for making sure you don't accidentally your CPU and on top of that getting a good sample. Depends if you want to go budget or if you want the top of the line - is 200Mhz worth it for you?
 

Yuriman

Diamond Member
Jun 25, 2004
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#6
I checked my CLU application after around a year, and found it had become clumpy. However, temps hadn't deteriorated. Fast forward 2 years - My chip is currently at 3800mhz, and hits about 60c under AVX loads with a low-profile CPU cooler.
 
Sep 5, 2003
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#7
200mhz extra overclock, shot warranty and most likely cratered resale value as anyone buying a delidded 6700K would for sure know you pushed it to the absolute limits over its life. Why go through all of that when you can get the Intel Performance Tuning Plan, pay $30-35, jam 1.45-1.5V into the thing and go for 4.9-5Ghz on water if you so desire, having a peace of mind if it dies you have warranty?

Besides, unless you will have GTX 1080 OC SLI and also get DDR4 4000, what exactly will be the actual real world benefit of those extra 200mhz?

I mean there are a lot of ways to add extra performance to Skylake using higher DDR4 memory alone:
http://www.techspot.com/article/1171-ddr4-4000-mhz-performance/

I've never sold a delidded Intel CPU before, so maybe I am wrong about a reduction in resale value. Just saying you'd be better off buying Skylake, selling that, getting Icelake, selling that, getting next gen after Icelake if you want the fastest CPU. Even with a 200mhz extra overclocking headroom 6700K will lose to Intel's next gen Icelake architecture. I think I'd rather spend $50 more towards faster DDR4, GPU, or save it towards an Icelake platform upgrade in 2.5-3 years or so. The faster GPU will provide guaranteed FPS boost, faster DDR4 can be reused for Icelake, etc.

Also, what happens if the delidded 6700K overclocks no better than an off the shelf higher binned 6700K? Can they take their 4.8Ghz model and at least delid that one so you actually have a legitimate shot at 4.9-5Ghz?
 
Last edited:
Apr 20, 2015
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#8
200mhz extra overclock, shot warranty and most likely cratered resale value as anyone buying a delidded 6700K would for sure know you pushed it to the absolute limits over its life. Why go through all of that when you can get the Intel Performance Tuning Plan, pay $30-35, jam 1.45-1.5V into the thing and go for 4.9-5Ghz on water if you so desire, having a peace of mind if it dies you have warranty?

Besides, unless you will have GTX 1080 OC SLI and also get DDR4 4000, what exactly will be the actual real world benefit of those extra 200mhz?

I mean there are a lot of ways to add extra performance to Skylake using higher DDR4 memory alone:
http://www.techspot.com/article/1171-ddr4-4000-mhz-performance/

I've never sold a delidded Intel CPU before, so maybe I am wrong about a reduction in resale value. Just saying you'd be better off buying Skylake, selling that, getting Icelake, selling that, getting next gen after Icelake if you want the fastest CPU. Even with a 200mhz extra overclocking headroom 6700K will lose to Intel's next gen Icelake architecture. I think I'd rather spend $50 more towards faster DDR4, GPU, or save it towards an Icelake platform upgrade in 2.5-3 years or so. The faster GPU will provide guaranteed FPS boost, faster DDR4 can be reused for Icelake, etc.

Also, what happens if the delidded 6700K overclocks no better than an off the shelf higher binned 6700K? Can they take their 4.8Ghz model and at least delid that one so you actually have a legitimate shot at 4.9-5Ghz?
My understanding of the process is they assign the CPU a Ghz rating based on a RealBench run, their mobo and the stated voltages. You choose which you want based on how much you want to pay.

If you pay 50 bucks extra they then delid the chip you have already bought. Seems fair to me, it's not like they are forcing anyone to pay the de-lid price to buy their CPU's.

They also have very decent prices. After delivery cost and currency conversion its still cheaper to buy a guaranteed moderate overclock 6700k from them then buy a random 6700k from an Australian online retailer.
 

superstition

Platinum Member
Feb 2, 2008
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#9
And people laughed me off the forum for saying that delidding and relidding with CLU was a massively easy business model for basically printing free money.
But but but... solder is so expensive for Intel! Won't someone please — think of Intel?

Oh, and if you subject your chip to nitrogen cooling the solder might crack. Oh, the humanity!

Seriously, the business model for printing money is convincing enthusiasts to destroy processors to compensate for intentionally sub-par stock thermal transfer — or force them to buy an E.
 

IEC

Super Moderator
Super Moderator
Jun 10, 2004
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#10
Waste of money. Lack of cooling isn't what's keeping my 6700K from breaking 4.6GHz.
 

crashtech

Diamond Member
Jan 4, 2013
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#11
As many people get OC dogs as get ones that do OK. I don't think it is entirely unreasonable to pay Silicon Lottery extra to take the guesswork out of buying a CPU intended for overclocking. But I don't think the delidding has enough value to consider paying for it.
 

Ferzerp

Diamond Member
Oct 12, 1999
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#12
I used that and it ran fine for ages (until I stopped using that PC). NT-H1, however, would stop working properly after a few weeks in that scenario.
 

Smoblikat

Diamond Member
Nov 19, 2011
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#13
I delidded my 3770K with a razor blade and wound up scratching part of the green PCB around the sides, but it didnt seem to damage it. I put CLU on and temps instantly dropped at least 20C under load. 3ish years later I just put the processor back in a computer and its still running like a champ. Tops out at 49C in Ark with a pahnteks cooler.
 

StrangerGuy

Diamond Member
May 9, 2004
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#14
Sure, if you want to spend money chasing an additional +100-200MHz OCs, more power to you. Just don't be pissed if others like me finds it foolish and completely unimpressive.
 

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