Should school/test accommodations for "disabilities" be noted?

DCal430

Diamond Member
Feb 12, 2011
6,020
9
81
So many children/adults are getting special treatment on homework and exams for things like ADHD, Dyslexia, Aspergers, PDD-NOS, and bunch of other disabilities.

These people get extra time on exams, extra time to do homework, personal note takers, and much more.

Don't you think these accommodations should be noted on their transcript or test results, so others know they got special treatment to get these scores or grades. I sure think so, it only seems fair.
 

SheHateMe

Diamond Member
Jul 21, 2012
7,251
20
81
....lol.


"These people"

You're making people with disabilities sound like they have the plague or something. Why should they have to wear a Scarlet letter because they got accommodations for their learning/physical disabilities?
 

Matthiasa

Diamond Member
May 4, 2009
5,755
23
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The only person I knew in any of my classes that got such help still weren't able to pass the classes which meant it accomplished nothing.

Either way still obvious troll. :p
 

Sluggo

Lifer
Jun 12, 2000
15,488
5
81
I want it noted on my transcript that I have short fingers, thus any illegible writing or typographical errors shall be considered "normal."

Hell put it on my resume as well, I need all the help I can get.
 

DCal430

Diamond Member
Feb 12, 2011
6,020
9
81
Not trolling, just saying allowing accommodations is fine, it should just be told to potential schools or employers when viewing said transcripts or test results.
 

PottedMeat

Lifer
Apr 17, 2002
12,365
475
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Yes, the OP should have all of his tests stamped with 'Retard' on them.

nail in forehead > stamp

w8n9l2.jpg
 

unokitty

Diamond Member
Jan 5, 2012
3,346
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"An unusually large number of Illinois public high school students — at least 1 out of 10 juniors — received extra time or other help to boost their scores on the ACT, including high achievers at some of the state's elite schools.

At powerhouse New Trier Township High School on the North Shore, the highest number in the state, 170 juniors — or 1 in 6 test takers — got special testing accommodations last year.

Almost 1 in 5 students who took the crucial college entrance exam at affluent Highland Park, Deerfield and Lake Forest high schools got assistance during state testing last spring, according to data not previously released to the public.
...
Schools in wealthy enclaves with predominantly white students were at the top of the list when it comes to students getting ACT testing accommodations in Illinois, the 2011 data show."

From:
Many Illinois high school students get special testing accommodations for ACT



What good is wealth, if you can't buy a little privilege?

And what good is privilege, if they mark it on the exam transcript?

Uno
 
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DCal430

Diamond Member
Feb 12, 2011
6,020
9
81
"An unusually large number of Illinois public high school students — at least 1 out of 10 juniors — received extra time or other help to boost their scores on the ACT, including high achievers at some of the state's elite schools.

At powerhouse New Trier Township High School on the North Shore, the highest number in the state, 170 juniors — or 1 in 6 test takers — got special testing accommodations last year.

Almost 1 in 5 students who took the crucial college entrance exam at affluent Highland Park, Deerfield and Lake Forest high schools got assistance during state testing last spring, according to data not previously released to the public.

...

Schools in wealthy enclaves with predominantly white students were at the top of the list when it comes to students getting ACT testing accommodations in Illinois, the 2011 data show."

From:
Many Illinois high school students get special testing accommodations for ACT


Uno

Yep, it is usually the rich kids who get this special treatment.
 

PenguinPower

Platinum Member
Apr 15, 2002
2,538
15
81
Not trolling, just saying allowing accommodations is fine, it should just be told to potential schools or employers when viewing said transcripts or test results.

Employers don't want to know. Too much liability.
 

aaksheytalwar

Diamond Member
Feb 17, 2012
3,389
0
76
I see no reason why they need to get extra time in tests. You should help with preparation and more guidance, tests should be a level ground. Life won't give them extra time to do the same job.
 

kami333

Diamond Member
Dec 12, 2001
5,110
2
76
"An unusually large number of Illinois public high school students — at least 1 out of 10 juniors — received extra time or other help to boost their scores on the ACT, including high achievers at some of the state's elite schools.

At powerhouse New Trier Township High School on the North Shore, the highest number in the state, 170 juniors — or 1 in 6 test takers — got special testing accommodations last year.

Almost 1 in 5 students who took the crucial college entrance exam at affluent Highland Park, Deerfield and Lake Forest high schools got assistance during state testing last spring, according to data not previously released to the public.
...
Schools in wealthy enclaves with predominantly white students were at the top of the list when it comes to students getting ACT testing accommodations in Illinois, the 2011 data show."

From:
Many Illinois high school students get special testing accommodations for ACT



What good is wealth, if you can't buy a little privilege?

And what good is privilege, if they mark it on the exam transcript?

Uno

If I remember correctly, ACT and SAT used to indicate on your score transcript if you took the test under non-standard conditions but after the GMAT got sued for discrimination they stopped doing it a couple years ago. I don't think the GRE does so anymore either. The MCAT and LSAT still do and they note with what the accommodation was along with the score.

Having grown up going to cram schools and taking entrance exams, to me it defeats the purpose of a standardized exam if not everyone is taking it under the same conditions. If there are medical conditions that need to be taken into account, then it should be done after the scores have been posted by whoever is evaluating the application.
 
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1sikbITCH

Diamond Member
Jan 3, 2001
4,194
574
126
So many children/adults are getting special treatment on homework and exams for things like ADHD, Dyslexia, Aspergers, PDD-NOS, and bunch of other disabilities.

These people get extra time on exams, extra time to do homework, personal note takers, and much more.

Don't you think these accommodations should be noted on their transcript or test results, so others know they got special treatment to get these scores or grades. I sure think so, it only seems fair.

I agree DCal430, to hell with cripples!

Sorry I'm off my meds this morning.
 

1sikbITCH

Diamond Member
Jan 3, 2001
4,194
574
126
Employers don't want to know. Too much liability.

Also the entire premise of what DCal suggests is certainly against HIPAA law (disclosure of health information) and then I do not believe employers can even ask that question nor discriminate against you because of any disability.

So the answer to the OP question in my mind is no, unless they want to get fined/sued for violating HIPAA law.
 

nehalem256

Lifer
Apr 13, 2012
15,669
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Also the entire premise of what DCal suggests is certainly against HIPAA law (disclosure of health information) and then I do not believe employers can even ask that question nor discriminate against you because of any disability.

So the answer to the OP question in my mind is no, unless they want to get fined/sued for violating HIPAA law.

How is stamping a transcript test grade that the person received X amount of extra time on an exam a violation of HIPAA?

While they cannot discriminate you for being disabled. They can discriminate against you if you are less qualified to do the work. If one person gets a score of 25 in an hour and another gets a score of 25 in 2 hours who would you want to hire?
 
Feb 25, 2011
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How is stamping a transcript test grade that the person received X amount of extra time on an exam a violation of HIPAA?

While they cannot discriminate you for being disabled. They can discriminate against you if you are less qualified to do the work. If one person gets a score of 25 in an hour and another gets a score of 25 in 2 hours who would you want to hire?

I have never needed to show my test scores to a potential employer... :/

Fwiw, most of these kids need an extra hour just to scrape by with a passing grade. Anybody who's worried about being shown up by the LD population is exhibiting either a lack of understanding of the situation, telling us something about themselves, or know an autistic math nerd and is forgetting that the plural of anecdotes != data.
 

kranky

Elite Member
Oct 9, 1999
21,014
137
106
Do away with the concept of extra time for certain people. Just make the test duration longer for everyone. It would actually make the test scores more meaningful to me.

The "give extra time" scenario:
Person A scores 85% in one hour.
Person B scores 70% in one hour.
Person C scores 80% but was given two hours.

A possible outcome with longer test time but no extra time:
Person A scores 85% in two hours. (But only needed one hour)
Person B scores 90% in two hours.
Person C scores 80% in two hours.

I put more weight on the overall score than how long it took (within reason). If Person B is smart but methodical and a little slower than most, that should count for something. Not artificially penalize someone who is not as speedy but can outperform the others and for whatever reason doesn't get "special" treatment.


And why do so many students need special accommodations compared to some years ago? When are they going to figure out what is causing rampant ADHD/autism/etc.? My money is on food additives.
 

Rakehellion

Lifer
Jan 15, 2013
12,182
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And why do so many students need special accommodations compared to some years ago? When are they going to figure out what is causing rampant ADHD/autism/etc.? My money is on food additives.

More media coverage, more diagnosing.

Oh, and Asperger's Syndrome no longer exists.
 

bignateyk

Lifer
Apr 22, 2002
11,288
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I was always the first person to turn in a test whether I aced it or failed it. If I didn't know how to do something I didn't just sit there for the full two hours like some people do. You either know it or you don't.
 

nehalem256

Lifer
Apr 13, 2012
15,669
8
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More media coverage, more diagnosing.

Oh, and Asperger's Syndrome no longer exists.

I think they did a study in Korea and uncovered a bunch of hidden children with Autism that were apparently functioning perfectly well in a normal classroom setting.
 

lxskllr

No Lifer
Nov 30, 2004
57,421
7,602
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I agree with the OP. A test is a standard, well known baseline to measure proficiency. If everyone doesn't follow the same rules, the baseline is meaningless. It's like using an unmarked yard(maybe?) stick.
 

kranky

Elite Member
Oct 9, 1999
21,014
137
106
I was always the first person to turn in a test whether I aced it or failed it. If I didn't know how to do something I didn't just sit there for the full two hours like some people do. You either know it or you don't.

I was the same way. Wasn't the smartest, but I was generally the fastest reader and writer.
 

cronos

Diamond Member
Nov 7, 2001
9,380
26
101
So many children/adults are getting special treatment on homework and exams for things like ADHD, Dyslexia, Aspergers, PDD-NOS, and bunch of other disabilities.

These people get extra time on exams, extra time to do homework, personal note takers, and much more.

Don't you think these accommodations should be noted on their transcript or test results, so others know they got special treatment to get these scores or grades. I sure think so, it only seems fair.

Not sure how it is everywhere else, but in Wisconsin they absolutely do this.

The field is called 'Accommodations' and at the back of the report it explains that it's where they note if the student received special accommodations during the test, e.g. extra time, etc.