Should I RMA i7 6700K? (Read Description) Thanks

EpicSurvivor

Senior member
Aug 14, 2012
774
15
91
#1
So I built a PC by my self for the first time February 2016. I was using an intel stock cooler (copper) not recommended I know but it was until I got a better cooler. Turns out I didn't fully clip on one of the latches on the Cooler, it wasn't pushed in all the way. I am using a Cryorig M9i now since I won't overclock yet. However I get bad stuttering on a lot of games every few seconds.
List of things I already did.
1) fresh OS install
2) got new HDD
3) got replacement MSI GTX 970
4) got replacement Motherboard
But issue still happens in most games. Should I RMA my i7 6700k? Could it be that when the fan wasn't on right and it was reaching 100c it damaged something? Hence the stuttering in game? It ran that hot for an entire year.

NOTE/EDIT: My Specs are on my signature
 

elpokor

Junior Member
May 22, 2017
23
0
41
#2
If you absolutely, positively, 100% know for sure that it has been running for long periods of time near thermal throttling (which is 95ºC, not 100ºC); chances are yes, the CPU could be degraded and thus producing stuttering...

But sanity checks first: have you updated the BIOS to the latest available? There have been several recent security patches applied to Windows and those need to play along with the CPU Microcode which is written on the BIOS. Make sure you have the latest BIOS https://www.gigabyte.com/Motherboard/GA-Z170X-Gaming-7-rev-10#support-dl-bios

Also, consider this: from my own experience with a 6600k, chances are you haven't overclocked your RAM and it's running at 2133 with default timings and that produces visible stuttering in quite some games. You can manually overclock the RAM to 2800 or 2933 (just bump up the frequency, don't touch timings, and set RAM Voltage around 1'25-1'3V) and you will notice that stutter disappears. Manually lock in BIOS VccSA to 1'050V and VccIO to 0'950V, those voltages should suffice if you don't go above 3200Mhz. Pretty much every RAM manufacturer rates the ICs up to 1'5V 24/7 operation so 1'3V for Vdimm should be safe in any scenario, don't be overly concerned about that. You can use Taiphoon Burner to check the part number of your ICs and google the specsheet in case you want to check the rating in your own.

I'm almost sure the BIOS update will fix it, but if it doesn't, try the RAM overclocking. Are you sure the CPU was hitting 100ºC consistently before you realised the latch wasn't fully clipped? The Intel stock cooler is certainly not adequate for overclocking but should be ok even with a somewhat defective mounting pressure for the regular average gaming and web browsing at stock speeds. I'd hope you wouldn't go above 85ºC in that scenario, but I haven't had a Intel stock cooler in ages.
 

UsandThem

Super Moderator
Super Moderator
May 4, 2000
10,714
492
136
#3
I'll throw this out there despite maybe this isn't your issue.

My old GA-Z170X-UD5 started stuttering and being a pain in the rear after Gigabyte released new BIOS updates. I think one of them might have been for the Skylake Hyper-threading bug. Even at the desktop, my mouse would randomly lag, and I eventually bought a new one that ended up doing the same thing.

When I saw the Asrock Z270 Taichi on sale at Newegg, I said screw it and ordered it. I have not had one issue with my PC since I laid the Gigabyte board to rest (the rest of my hardware has stayed the same). It was good at first, but Gigabyte's BIOS updates leave much to be desired (remember how much it sucked when you had to revert to a previous BIOS version?). Plus, there were BIOS updates that ended up over-volting the CPU.

If you do end up RMAing the CPU, and you still have issues after you get it back, do yourself a favor and try a different board.
 

EpicSurvivor

Senior member
Aug 14, 2012
774
15
91
#4
If you absolutely, positively, 100% know for sure that it has been running for long periods of time near thermal throttling (which is 95ºC, not 100ºC); chances are yes, the CPU could be degraded and thus producing stuttering...

But sanity checks first: have you updated the BIOS to the latest available? There have been several recent security patches applied to Windows and those need to play along with the CPU Microcode which is written on the BIOS. Make sure you have the latest BIOS https://www.gigabyte.com/Motherboard/GA-Z170X-Gaming-7-rev-10#support-dl-bios

Also, consider this: from my own experience with a 6600k, chances are you haven't overclocked your RAM and it's running at 2133 with default timings and that produces visible stuttering in quite some games. You can manually overclock the RAM to 2800 or 2933 (just bump up the frequency, don't touch timings, and set RAM Voltage around 1'25-1'3V) and you will notice that stutter disappears. Manually lock in BIOS VccSA to 1'050V and VccIO to 0'950V, those voltages should suffice if you don't go above 3200Mhz. Pretty much every RAM manufacturer rates the ICs up to 1'5V 24/7 operation so 1'3V for Vdimm should be safe in any scenario, don't be overly concerned about that. You can use Taiphoon Burner to check the part number of your ICs and google the specsheet in case you want to check the rating in your own.

I'm almost sure the BIOS update will fix it, but if it doesn't, try the RAM overclocking. Are you sure the CPU was hitting 100ºC consistently before you realised the latch wasn't fully clipped? The Intel stock cooler is certainly not adequate for overclocking but should be ok even with a somewhat defective mounting pressure for the regular average gaming and web browsing at stock speeds. I'd hope you wouldn't go above 85ºC in that scenario, but I haven't had a Intel stock cooler in ages.
Yes it was according to HWMonitor. 100c constantly. I didn't pick up on it until almost 10 months after having build the PC. Realizing there after that the issue was the fan not installed correctly (Cooler) I realized that it had being running this temperature the whole entire 10 month laps. Since it wasn't being caused by another issue.


I'll throw this out there despite maybe this isn't your issue.

My old GA-Z170X-UD5 started stuttering and being a pain in the rear after Gigabyte released new BIOS updates. I think one of them might have been for the Skylake Hyper-threading bug. Even at the desktop, my mouse would randomly lag, and I eventually bought a new one that ended up doing the same thing.

When I saw the Asrock Z270 Taichi on sale at Newegg, I said screw it and ordered it. I have not had one issue with my PC since I laid the Gigabyte board to rest (the rest of my hardware has stayed the same). It was good at first, but Gigabyte's BIOS updates leave much to be desired (remember how much it sucked when you had to revert to a previous BIOS version?). Plus, there were BIOS updates that ended up over-volting the CPU.

If you do end up RMAing the CPU, and you still have issues after you get it back, do yourself a favor and try a different board.
"UsandThem" Indeed I had a conversation with my dad who is not computer literate about the same exact thing in the car just an hour ago, he was able to understand my explanation of the voltages not working as default and required by Manufacturer as intended. My main issue and I need lots of help here is how can I sell this MoBo in a way that the seller will not be able to ask for a refund after Purchase? I mean I would legitimatly name the issues and cause for selling but I need to find a way that the seller cannot ask for refund that the sale is final. Reason being I don't have much funds right now virtually broke and the Money from Selling the "Defective" Gigabyte Motherboard will go towards a "Cheaper" New Replacement, as I plan to spend nothing out of pocket for the New MoBo.

Interesting, I assume you remember my post about the Gigabyte BIOS update issue I was having in Reverting back to old BIOS. Many had the same issue. Also the Overvolting as you mentioned was something lots of people were complaining about. In fact I just reversed the "UNDER Volting" I had from a negative offset of -0.65 to default on BIOS and I am going to do a few test using Intel Processor Diagnostic.

I am currently on F22f BIOS so the Overvolting issue should have being resolved at this point but apperantly it hasn't. I'll def buy a new MoBo if I sell this one.

NOTE: I am at fault for not installing the Cooler properly the first time, However I know the issue of cause for this to happen is MOBO related rather then CPU related being that I have a decent CPU cooler installed and the Severe Voltage regulation problem with this Board.

Hope I was able to make sense in my reply, just arrived home.



Thank you both for the great replies. I appreciate the thorough replies you guys provided.
 

EpicSurvivor

Senior member
Aug 14, 2012
774
15
91
#5
EDIT: Not constantly, but when I was gaming which was almost constantly lmao my bad.
 

UsandThem

Super Moderator
Super Moderator
May 4, 2000
10,714
492
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#6
"UsandThem" Indeed I had a conversation with my dad who is not computer literate about the same exact thing in the car just an hour ago, he was able to understand my explanation of the voltages not working as default and required by Manufacturer as intended. My main issue and I need lots of help here is how can I sell this MoBo in a way that the seller will not be able to ask for a refund after Purchase? I mean I would legitimatly name the issues and cause for selling but I need to find a way that the seller cannot ask for refund that the sale is final. Reason being I don't have much funds right now virtually broke and the Money from Selling the "Defective" Gigabyte Motherboard will go towards a "Cheaper" New Replacement, as I plan to spend nothing out of pocket for the New MoBo.
If you get the CPU back and still have issues, you can always sell the motherboard "as is" and detail the issues you suspect it is causing. You will likely not get much in return doing it this way, however. You can always RMA the board again, and get another refurb, but that will likely cost you $20 to mail it to them.

Maybe you can tolerate the stuttering for now, and save up a few bucks and buy a board on sale once you have enough. Prior to this board, I had used Gigabyte quite a bit for my motherboards, but their BIOS team (or whoever they contract it out to) is absolutely atrocious. It will be a while before I consider them again. Now all motherboard manufacturers have duds, and have made some mistakes, but Gigabyte caught me off guard with their updates over-volting, bricking, and otherwise rendering a nice board to being a headache.
 

EpicSurvivor

Senior member
Aug 14, 2012
774
15
91
#7
If you get the CPU back and still have issues, you can always sell the motherboard "as is" and detail the issues you suspect it is causing. You will likely not get much in return doing it this way, however. You can always RMA the board again, and get another refurb, but that will likely cost you $20 to mail it to them.

Maybe you can tolerate the stuttering for now, and save up a few bucks and buy a board on sale once you have enough. Prior to this board, I had used Gigabyte quite a bit for my motherboards, but their BIOS team (or whoever they contract it out to) is absolutely atrocious. It will be a while before I consider them again. Now all motherboard manufacturers have duds, and have made some mistakes, but Gigabyte caught be off guard with their updates over-volting, bricking, and otherwise rendering a nice board to being a headache.
Yeah I can wait but I am so tempted (80% tempted 20% scared) To flash BIOS from F22f Current to F22m newest (2018/03/09) what do you recommend? Should I go ahead and pull the Trigger now and do it?
 

UsandThem

Super Moderator
Super Moderator
May 4, 2000
10,714
492
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#8
Yeah I can wait but I am so tempted (80% tempted 20% scared) To flash BIOS from F22f Current to F22m newest (2018/03/09) what do you recommend? Should I go ahead and pull the Trigger now and do it?
You can try it and see if it helps any. Since I finally got fed up enough with my board, I haven't really looked at what they have / haven't screwed up lately.

I actually just looked at the update you mentioned, and it looks like it's likely just a Spectre/Meltdown BIOS patch based on the date/description. It likely won't help with the stuttering issues, and it will likely reduce your CPU performance 6% - 10%.
 

EpicSurvivor

Senior member
Aug 14, 2012
774
15
91
#9
UPDATE: Updated BIOS TO F22m yesterday, down volted and I installed some Windows 7 updates. System is running fine at this point. Will determine what course of action I take in the future, but I am thinking of just buying a new MoBo and discard this Gigabyte one. There is no reason why I should have to down volt my CPU just so the temperatures don't get to 75c under load. That's not how it should work imo.

Thanks for all the help once again guys.
Cheers!
 

ZGR

Golden Member
Oct 26, 2012
1,816
37
106
#10
I would RMA it. But out of curiosity's sake I would use Intel XTU or Throttlestop to manually find the highest frequency your CPU can maintain.
 

beginner99

Diamond Member
Jun 2, 2009
4,050
148
126
#11
Did you apply thermal paste? And if yes how much? Did you reapply after finding your error? If not, do it now.
 

EpicSurvivor

Senior member
Aug 14, 2012
774
15
91
#12
I would RMA it. But out of curiosity's sake I would use Intel XTU or Throttlestop to manually find the highest frequency your CPU can maintain.
I don't know how to use those softwares. I don't know what to look for, no worries explaining right now after doing an update and Flashing BIOS to latest version the system seems to be running... at least for now, better.

Did you apply thermal paste? And if yes how much? Did you reapply after finding your error? If not, do it now.
Of course. The recommended standard pea size amount. Yes I reapplied when I was installing the Cryorig M9i. BIOS Update and Windows Update seem to have made the system more responsive. Will wait and see if something comes up I'll necro this thread again.

Thanks for the support.
 

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