Question Shall I go for 1TB now and upgrade to 2TB next year or just go stright to 2TB?

Apr 12, 2018
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#1
Hi, I probably can get by with 1TB for Windows and 1TB for Linux this year. However, for next year, I may need 2TB for Linux and for certain 2TB for Windows. I don't have much use for 1TB spare SSD. Given that the cost of SSD continue to drop and things may get faster next year, shall I just wait for next year or just go straight to the 2TB version?
 

nosirrahx

Senior member
Mar 24, 2018
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#2
What form factor and PC or laptop?

Assuming that you mean SATA I would do the 2TB now and not deal with the BS later.

If you are talking about a M.2 2TB drive, those might get a lot cheaper, waiting might be worth it.
 
Apr 12, 2018
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#3
Sorry for not being clear. I am talking about NvME M.2 Samsung 970 EVO Plus SSD. I am using a 970 Evo 1TB SSD on my Windows desktop right now. If I get two 970 EVO Plus 2TB, I will put my existing one on a laptop.
 

nosirrahx

Senior member
Mar 24, 2018
244
22
61
#4
Sorry for not being clear. I am talking about NvME M.2 Samsung 970 EVO Plus SSD. I am using a 970 Evo 1TB SSD on my Windows desktop right now. If I get two 970 EVO Plus 2TB, I will put my existing one on a laptop.
I am expecting 4TB M.2 NVMe drives sometimes within a year and this will drop the 2TB price a bit. I guess its a matter of convenience. If you don't feel like dealing with this later the 2TB Evo Plus is a great drive even for the current price.
 
Apr 12, 2018
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#5
How likely will the 4TB M.2 NVMe SSD be available within a year? For NVMe SSD, what is the limitation of size?
 

nosirrahx

Senior member
Mar 24, 2018
244
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#6
May 19, 2011
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#7
@anandtechreader

Do you realise that Windows and Linux can share file systems?

For example, I migrated from Windows to Linux as my primary OS (from just Win7 to Lubuntu + Win10). The bulk of my storage capacity is a 1TB HDD formatted NTFS to Windows can see it natively and Linux hasn't had any issues talking to it right out of the box without any configuration work required.

There is also an ext4 driver for Windows if you wanted to read the Linux file systems in Windows, I don't know how good it is and whether it has write support.

I'm using hardly any space for my Lubuntu install. I've got it on a 128GB SSD, and 90% of the capacity used is my home folder, and 99% of that is used by a Windows 7 VM image. I've got a small amount of "current" personal data on that drive and the rest is on the HDD. I just think that if you're thinking of dual-booting and you're allocating that much capacity for each OS and related data, you're bound to end up with duplication because there'll always be some stuff that you want to access in both operating systems.

I'd certainly advise having operating systems installed in separate partitions though.
 

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