Setting up a network topology

Yohhan

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May 17, 2002
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If I have two separate, simple networks each in a building 2 km away from each other and I wanted to connect them using a T1 line, what is the necessary equipment I would need to buy? And where can I find the cost of the equipment? If at the present time each of the two networks just consists of a hub connecting all of the local machines.
 

spidey07

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Aug 4, 2000
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a router with a built in CSU would work fine. Make sure they are using different IP subnets.

Or you could try wireless and not have the monthly fee?
 

Yohhan

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May 17, 2002
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Is there a wireless product that will travel 2 km?

This may be a stupid question, but why would there be a monthly fee associated with the T1? Is it not possible to pay a one time fee just to have the cable put down between the two buildings?
 

spidey07

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Aug 4, 2000
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Originally posted by: Yohhan
Is there a wireless product that will travel 2 km?

This may be a stupid question, but why would there be a monthly fee associated with the T1? Is it not possible to pay a one time fee just to have the cable put down between the two buildings?

In a perfect world you would pay someone to lay down fiber optic cable...that way you'd never worry about speed/bandwidth between the buildings.

A t1 is a circuit you order from you phone company and pay them a monthly fee just like you would a phone line.

Look in to cisco wireless and directional antenna. If you can see the building from the roof or other highest mounting place for the antenna with no obstructions (trees, buildings, etc) then wireless will work great.
 

Yohhan

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May 17, 2002
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I'm looking at the following product:

AIR-ANT58G10SSA-N

Two questions. First, under "Cabling and Wiring" the specs show that this product has a "1xN-Series Connector". What is that and how do I connect that to my Ethernet network? Then, once connected to my network, do I just buy a second one, connect it to the second network, and then point them at one another?

Thanks.
 

spidey07

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Aug 4, 2000
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I don't do much wireless. KTWEBB is our residant wireless guru.

Antenna plugs into wireless access point, wireless access point plugs into your ethernet network and in essence "bridges" the wireless and wired net.

Do be carefull though because if you're sticking something up on a roof you need grounding/lightning protection.
 

JackMDS

Elite Member
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Oct 25, 1999
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Two Towers in line of sight. Two good Directional Antennae, and Cisco Airnet Wireless hardware might travel 2Km. There are also more powerful solutions.

Hardware for such a project.

Link: 2.4 GHz Antennas.:light:
 

AFB

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Jan 10, 2004
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Originally posted by: JackMDS
Two Towers in line of sight. Two good Directional Antennae, and Cisco Airnet Wireless hardware might travel 2Km. There are also more powerful solutions.

Hardware for such a project.

Link: 2.4 GHz Antennas.:light:

2k is nothing if you have line of sight. I have seen wireless stuff go for miles.(It wasn't cheap)
 

JackMDS

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Oct 25, 1999
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Originally posted by: amdfanboy
I have seen wireless stuff go for miles.(It wasn't cheap)

There might be in the geographical area, elements of extreme Humidity, Water bodies, a lot of Wet Vegetation. etc. Thus any general remark of this nature has to be taken with many grain of salt.:eek:
 

Boscoh

Senior member
Jan 23, 2002
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To get the list prices for Cisco stuff without going through someone else, you have to have a CCO account.

You can get a lot of general prices for Cisco stuff by searching CDW.com.
 

JackMDS

Elite Member
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Oct 25, 1999
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Originally posted by: Yohhan
What do I need to do for grounding/lightning protection?
You Ground both Antennae, with a Rod to the Ground, or you buy Antenna protection kit (expensive).

 

Dark

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Oct 24, 1999
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You will need two directional antennas...two yagis would work juste fine and two wireless bridges (or one workgroup bridge and one access point if you are on a tight budget...all your wired equipement switch whatever would connect to the bridges (keep in mind that bridges are more expensive than Access points The ciscos are expensive but very good). Don't forget that visual line of sight is not enough since you have to have the fresnel zone free of obstruction up to 20-40%. Regarding lightning, a common solution is to have an optical fiber running between you antennas and your equipement, you can use converter for Rj45 to Optical. it's not cheap but it is one of the best solution out there. Also don't forget to seal your connectors...rain can be a biatch :)
You also have to take into account the FCC regulation concerning intentionnal radiator...for a point to point link you're not allowed more than 52dbi...oversimplified but I am too lazy :)
 

Yohhan

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May 17, 2002
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Cool, thanks.

What's the difference between a wireless bridge and a workgroup bridge?
 

JackMDS

Elite Member
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Oct 25, 1999
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Wireless Hardware work in variety of Modes.

Good Access Points are very flexible and can be configured in few modes.


Work Group Bridge is a specific product that set to act as a Driverless Wireless Clint that can communicate with an Access Point and can be plugged into a Switch, thus providing connection to few computers. Since it is not as flexible as an Access Point it is less expensive.

Link to: Wireless Network - Configuration Modes.

Link to: Cisco 352 Work Group Bridge.

By buying one Access point, and One Work Group Bridge you save, since it is less expensive than two Bridges.