Serverboard or MotherBoard setup for high end gaming and content creation?

Gibrril

Junior Member
Apr 17, 2015
1
0
0
#1
Hi all,

I'm planning on doing a massive upgrade to my system, which is used for 3D graphics creation, music production and gaming.

I know of some very interesting setups (for gaming) but all of these use a workstation motherboard, which limits me to an 8 core cpu.

If I were to use a serverboard approach I could manage a setup with two cpu's which would mean a maximum of 32 cores (AMD opteron)

These server boards also have the option of hooking up multiple PCIe devices such as multilpe graphics cards etc, (I could hook up up to four NVIDIA Titan cards) and can hold a lot more DIMM memory.
What about power supply for a server setup? How would that work?
Yet could all that power be used to its full potential? Even if you run Windows 7 Ultimate and not a sever edition? Or is there a bottlneck somewhere that renders all that capacity useless?
I would realy like to know what the upsides and downsides are when you use a server rig instead of a desktop rig.

Thanks a lot,

Gibrril
 
Last edited:

Cerb

Elite Member
Aug 26, 2000
17,485
0
86
#2
If you're doing all that for professional work, buy a workstation.

If home, stick with 1 CPU, and save your sanity.

The main downsides to a server rig are that compatibility is not as good, and if you plan to game, some games will not run with multiple CPUs correctly. Secondary to that, less IO on the board, as rule. Most everything else can be worked around. You need a Windows Server OS to serve many clients, and not much else.
 
Last edited:

mfenn

Elite Member
Super Moderator
Jan 17, 2010
22,403
0
71
www.mfenn.com
#3
If you're doing all that for professional work, buy a workstation.

If home, stick with 1 CPU, and save your sanity.

The main downsides to a server rig are that compatibility is not as good, and if you plan to game, some games will not run with multiple CPUs correctly. Secondary to that, less IO on the board, as rule. Most everything else can be worked around. You need a Windows Server OS to serve many clients, and not much else.
Additionally, high core-count server CPUs generally run at lower clock speeds than desktop CPUs, which limits gaming performance becasue games still care very much about having a few fast threads.

Don't expect dual-socket server motherboards to have been tested with SLI. It may or may not work depending on the PCIe topology of the particular board.
 


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