Seriously consider moving to Linux

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WilliamM2

Platinum Member
Jun 14, 2012
2,327
439
126
I'm going to suggest what may seem to be a radical strategy to you: Stop at the point of saying "I've never experienced that before" and acknowledge that your experience is not definitive.
I would have, but you started arguing after I said that, that I WAS seeing these things.

Why not just admit that you don't know how to set up windows?
 

mikeymikec

Lifer
May 19, 2011
17,435
8,928
136
I would have, but you started arguing after I said that, that I WAS seeing these things.
No: I questioned you specifically on one point to confirm that you truly hadn't seen one of the most notorious messages in Win10/11 because frankly I was amazed.


Why not just admit that you don't know how to set up windows?

Please, sir, put your penis away. I don't want to see it. This website is meant to be family-friendly.

---

I'm done arguing with you.
 

Ajay

Lifer
Jan 8, 2001
15,332
7,789
136
Load up Arch Linux or Manjaro Linux and try running your favorite games under Wine. If the experience is acceptable, say bye bye to Windows. Another game focused distro is POP_OS but I've read that Arch has Valve's blessing and Manjaro is based on Arch.
Tried that - too many problems. Some can be solved by doing this and that (edit the conf file, use this command line to launch, blah, blah) - but then a game update screws that over. I don't want more problems - I want less.
 

pmv

Lifer
May 30, 2008
12,871
7,796
136
Dual boot? Then play about with various options such as Wine or playing under Linux natively and/or fall back to Windows for gaming?

I have my old PC set to dual boot - have to use ubuntu for certain things anyway. But trying to get games to work I suspect will be a painful amount of effort.

In reality I mostly use the PC for 'curating' my irrationally-large music and podcast and audiobook collections.

It's bugging me the way that the larger those collections become, the more dependent I am on keeping the machine running and the more imposing a prospect switching platforms or upgrading becomes. Feels as if it's all gotten a bit out-of-hand somewhere along the line.
 
Jul 27, 2020
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But trying to get games to work I suspect will be a painful amount of effort.

In reality I mostly use the PC for 'curating' my irrationally-large music and podcast and audiobook collections.
There's CrossOver from Codeweavers that may offer better compatibility than Wine. But not free.

Music/podcast/audiobooks shouldn't be dependent on Windows unless they are tied to some really draconian DRM.
 
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manly

Lifer
Jan 25, 2000
10,742
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There's CrossOver from Codeweavers that may offer better compatibility than Wine. But not free.

Music/podcast/audiobooks shouldn't be dependent on Windows unless they are tied to some really draconian DRM.
It's mostly free nowadays because with Steam Deck, Valve is driving the gaming on Linux bus.
 
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Triloby

Senior member
Mar 18, 2016
585
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Load up Arch Linux or Manjaro Linux and try running your favorite games under Wine. If the experience is acceptable, say bye bye to Windows. Another game focused distro is POP_OS but I've read that Arch has Valve's blessing and Manjaro is based on Arch.

You don't need to choose specific distros. Any Linux distro can run your games through Wine/Proton. As long as both Steam and Proton are installed (through either native packages or containers [Flatpak, Snap, etc.]), the end result should be the same.

Outside of Steam, apps such as Lutris and Heroic Games Launcher are there for your GOG, Uplay, Battle.net, EA Games, and Epic Games purchases. Then there's Bottles to help streamline setups of Windows apps through Wine, if you can't play your games through either Steam, Lutris, or Heroic.

The real big issue are games that require anti-cheat solutions that simply won't work on Linux through Proton/Wine. ProtonDB can tell you what's playable and unplayable on Linux.