Seasonic: OEM vs Retail QUALITY?

Discussion in 'Power Supplies' started by Necc, Jan 22, 2013.

  1. Necc

    Necc Senior member

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    Hey there!

    So...I know that OEM Seasonics are based on regular Seasonic designs, like S12II or M12D...but internal quality wise, they differ.

    But to what degree to they differ? Can anyone attest to the quality differential inside the PSUs? Like, what capacitors do the OEMs use and is something missing in the OEM one?

    Any input would be appreciated.

    Thanks.
     
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  3. Gigantopithecus

    Gigantopithecus Diamond Member

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    How do you know that retail SeaSonics are different from OEM SeaSonics? Typically "OEM" means the product doesn't come with retail packaging and accessories. It shouldn't mean the actual product is different.
     
  4. Necc

    Necc Senior member

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    If you look closely at the SS-400ET you see it having a basic look with no sleeved cables + beeing much cheaper then lets say a S12II-430B

    and F.Y.I if you look closely you can see at the newegg link, the end of the SS-400ET naming you see an "OEM" sign.

    Here where I live the SS-400ET can be had for almost half the price of the S12II-430B, so my question is how realible are the SS-xxxET series? Can't be that bad after all they are seasonic?
     
    #3 Necc, Jan 22, 2013
    Last edited: Jan 22, 2013
  5. ericloewe

    ericloewe Senior member

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    Same thing internally. OEM stuff just comes in a format OEMs like - basic stuff only.
     
  6. Gigantopithecus

    Gigantopithecus Diamond Member

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    Ahh, gotcha. I was confused by your initial question. The two specific models you're referring to are entirely different products - not just an OEM version vs. a retail version of the same actual PSU. In any event, in my experience, the OEM models are usually pretty similar to the retail models, though sometimes the internal components vary a bit. The retail SeaSonics are usually as good as PSUs get, and the OEMs are usually just a step below the retails in terms of quality. That is, OEM SeaSonic PSUs are still very good, and better than a lot of other manufacturer's retail products.

    In your case, where the OEM is half the price of the retail, I personally would not bother spending the extra money on a retail product. I've used dozens and dozens of OEM SeaSonic PSUs without issue.
     
  7. Necc

    Necc Senior member

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    Well thats the answer that iwas hoping for :)

    Thanks a lot. :thumbsup:
     
  8. Rvenger

    Rvenger Elite Member <br> Super Moderator <br> Video Cards
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    In the past, Seasonic OEM PSUs contained Taiwan caps (Teapo and OST) and the retail units had the quality Japanese Rubycons.
     
  9. Z15CAM

    Z15CAM Golden Member

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    #8 Z15CAM, Jan 22, 2013
    Last edited: Jan 22, 2013
  10. Necc

    Necc Senior member

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    That psu looks awesome, but it's too expensive for my taste. Iwant something cheap and realible for a media center rig build. (A10-5800k, 8GB RAM and HD7770 GPU) :)
     
  11. bryanl

    bryanl Golden Member

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    The 620W Antec recently mentioned in the Hot Deals forum is a Seasonic with Teapo capacitors, while the Seasonic branded version has a Japanese make, perhaps Chemicons.
     
  12. Rvenger

    Rvenger Elite Member <br> Super Moderator <br> Video Cards
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    I'm talking the Seasonic name brand. Not a rebadge. Antec decides what quality caps go in their power supplies.
     
  13. bryanl

    bryanl Golden Member

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    Do you mean Seasonic is rebadged Seasonic?
     
  14. JEDIYoda

    JEDIYoda Lifer

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    I seriously doubt that....
     
  15. contrvlr

    contrvlr Junior Member

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    SS-300ET
    [​IMG]
     
  16. Necc

    Necc Senior member

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    Isn't that an S12II group design?
     
  17. contrvlr

    contrvlr Junior Member

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    Yes
    Can find a review of the 400w here
    http://www.anandtech.com/show/2697/30

    No little "warranty void if removed sticker" on these, so I figured I'd give a look
    Seeing all Teapos wasn't to pleasing, but hey it is supposed to be the "entry level" line
     
  18. SkyMonkey

    SkyMonkey Junior Member

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    Hello,

    Found this post where you've shown some internal picks of the SS-300ET supply.

    I have this supply running a small NAS system, and the fan has started making a clicking sound after only a few hundred hours of operation.

    Since I've sleeved and modified the cables, I've voided the warranty, and am going to open it up to replace the fan.

    Can you let me know if the fan is soldiered on or if there's a 2 pin header? Also, is it the same fan as is shown in the review of the 400W here: http://www.anandtech.com/show/2697/30

    Not looking forward to disassembling this system to get at it, as it's rather buried, so any info you can provide ahead of time would be very helpful.

    Thanks,
    SkyMonkey
     
  19. Harvey

    Harvey Administrator<br>Elite Member
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    If you know how to handle a soldering iron, replacing a fan is not that difficult. Most supplies are held together with conventional phillips screws, and the fan, itself is retained by a specific type of thick, self-tapping screws.

    The key issues are the size of the fan, the mounting holes, the rotation speed, the current draw (in mA or Amps), the air flow (typically in CFM - cubic ft. per minute) and the type of bushing. Ball bearings are better than sleeve bearings, and double ball bearings are better than singles.

    You can probably get the specs for the orignal fan by checking the manufacturer's site or by searching Google for the make and model number or for the PSU make and model + fan. If your fan has a two pin connector, and you can only find the right fan without one, you clip the connector from the old fan (or anything else with the right connector) and solder the respective red and black leads to each other. A little heat shrink tubing will make a nice, clean assembly.

    All Electronics, in Van Nuys, Ca. specializes in buying and reselling closeout lots of electronic componenents. They have a large selection of fans at very low prices. If you find one or more that looks like it would work, you can check their specs from the manufacturers and search further for any info about their reliability.
     
  20. SkyMonkey

    SkyMonkey Junior Member

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    Thanks for the info. I managed to find some other pictures on the badcaps.net forums, and it looks like it's a 2 pin header internally.

    I'll take a look at the fan model tonight, but I think it's likely the same one as was used in the 400W version reviewed here.

    I'll likely use a Scythe S-FDB fan of some kind with a low starting voltage since it'll be mounted horizontally. If I can find one here locally.

    Just not looking forward to taking the system apart due to the time I spent with cable management getting it together in the first place!
     
  21. Harvey

    Harvey Administrator<br>Elite Member
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    Yeah, but it beats the hell out of waiting until the fan fails, and the PSU smokes. :eek:

    A clicking noise from a fan is unusual so, before you tear too much of it apart, double check by booting the system with the case open to make sure there isn't a stray wire, piece of tie wrap, etc. rubbing or poking into some fan in the system (PSU, CPU, vid card).

    Good luck. :)