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SC to vote on public funding for religious schools

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Nov 29, 2006
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If only religions had special buildings they could use for teaching religion. Crazy idea I know, but could you imagine if they all got together on say a Sunday and learned religion? Wishful thinking on my part I’m sure.

maybe they can leave actual schools for teaching real life skills.
 

WelshBloke

Lifer
Jan 12, 2005
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If only religions had special buildings they could use for teaching religion. Crazy idea I know, but could you imagine if they all got together on say a Sunday and learned religion? Wishful thinking on my part I’m sure.

maybe they can leave actual schools for teaching real life skills.
Maybe people from different religions or no religion should demand time in those buildings as well! I mean they special treatment wrt public funds!
 
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ch33zw1z

Lifer
Nov 4, 2004
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I don't think religious schools should get any taxpayer money. Not even a dime.
Pcgeek, you and I agree. As a product of a religious school, I don't think they should get a single penny. My parents chose to send me there. Although, my dad did manage to not file taxes for like 10 years
 
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dawp

Lifer
Jul 2, 2005
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ya know what so bad, I saw SC in title of thread and immediately thought South Carolina because living in NC it is totally believable.
 

Greenman

Lifer
Oct 15, 1999
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There are two Catholic high schools near me that have a pretty good reputations for academics. It seems like that should be a part of the decision for allowing state money into the school.
 

ch33zw1z

Lifer
Nov 4, 2004
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There are two Catholic high schools near me that have a pretty good reputations for academics. It seems like that should be a part of the decision for allowing state money into the school.
Why would a private religious schools academics make it a candidate for public funds?
 

IronWing

No Lifer
Jul 20, 2001
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There are two Catholic high schools near me that have a pretty good reputations for academics. It seems like that should be a part of the decision for allowing state money into the school.
The Catholics set up a separate K-12 school system in the U.S. specifically to avoid the Protestant religious indoctrination that was taking place in the public school system.
 

Starbuck1975

Lifer
Jan 6, 2005
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The Catholics set up a separate K-12 school system in the U.S. specifically to avoid the Protestant religious indoctrination that was taking place in the public school system.
Yep, plus Catholic schools were often the only path for working class city kids to blaze a path to Ivy league schools and social mobility. If a state is offering vouchers or subsidies for students to attend private school, it shouldn’t exclude religious ones.
 

Greenman

Lifer
Oct 15, 1999
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Yep, plus Catholic schools were often the only path for working class city kids to blaze a path to Ivy league schools and social mobility. If a state is offering vouchers or subsidies for students to attend private school, it shouldn’t exclude religious ones.
Seems like curriculum and results should be the standard.
 

ch33zw1z

Lifer
Nov 4, 2004
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If a state is offering vouchers or subsidies for students to attend private school, it shouldn’t exclude religious ones.
from the article:

The focal point of Wednesday's argument was a ruling by the Montana Supreme Court that struck down a tax subsidy for both religious and nonreligious private schools. The Montana court said that the subsidy violated a state constitutional provision barring any state aid to religious schools, whether direct or indirect.


Thirty-seven other states have no-aid state constitutional provisions similar to Montana's, and for decades conservative religious groups and school-choice advocates have sought to get rid of them. On Wednesday, though, that goal looked a lot closer.

Five of the justices at some time in their lives attended private Catholic schools, and some of them were particularly vocal. Justice Brett Kavanaugh said that the history of excluding religious schools from public funding has its roots in the "religious bigotry against Catholics" in the late 1800s. He seemed to dismiss arguments made by the state's lawyer that Montana had completely rewritten its constitution in 1972, without any such bias.
They weren't. This is Christians wanting more special treatment.
 

Starbuck1975

Lifer
Jan 6, 2005
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from the article:



They weren't. This is Christians wanting more special treatment.
It’s Christians wanting equal treatment. The reason behind Montana’s action is an underlying religious exclusion that is arguably discriminatory in nature. It is appropriate for SCOTUS to weigh in.
 

Zorba

Diamond Member
Oct 22, 1999
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There are two Catholic high schools near me that have a pretty good reputations for academics. It seems like that should be a part of the decision for allowing state money into the school.
The best school in the state here is affiliated with religion, and there a few Catholic schools that are very highly rated too. But if you give them public funds, you'd also have to give funds to the "school" at the non-denominational church whose purpose in life in indoctrination, not education.

Public funds should be used on public schools, period.
 

ch33zw1z

Lifer
Nov 4, 2004
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It’s Christians wanting equal treatment. The reason behind Montana’s action is an underlying religious exclusion that is arguably discriminatory in nature. It is appropriate for SCOTUS to weigh in.
Then you disagree with the facts in the article. Separation of church and state, so sorry.
 

herm0016

Diamond Member
Feb 26, 2005
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this is interesting.

seems to me they should have left it to the state. reading through some DOE documents, many states have different views on this issue. some have curriculum standards, some don't etc.

Maybe we should be providing funding for school lunch and after school care programs that help low income people at all schools, but i don't think we should pay for teachers, real estate, etc. i wonder if religious schools can apply for those grants for programs that help low income people?

education is so important. i am happy that my property taxes, as a childless person, go to school funding. i do think there should be some curriculum standards for all schools no matter private or public.
why are "religious" schools treated any different than any other "private" school? some private schools around here specialize in stem or art or whatever, what is the real difference?

if they were to get public money, they should have to adhear to all the curriculum, testing, teacher certifications, etc. that any public school in the state has to follow.

when i was in school, my bus picked up the kids for the christian school and public, and dropped them off at the different schools. not sure how the funding was worked out.

many questions. few answers.
 

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