News [SA] Cisco Appoints AMD President and CEO Dr. Lisa T. Su to Board of Directors

moinmoin

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Did Su look for companies with security track records clearly worse than Intel or how did she end up there?
 

Soulkeeper

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Maybe she is just lining up her next job posting. Get that big golden parachute from AMD and move on. These upper level execs move around like the wind.
 
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Hitman928

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Are people not aware of the fact that a CEO getting appointed as a Director elsewhere is extremely common?

It's not a sign that she's leaving, not at all.
This is true, well performing CEOs are pretty much always asked to be board members at other companies. It's also true that when they are board members of other companies it's uncommon for them to then become CEO of that company. The board of director's are the ones who hire the CEO so it would be an unusual situation though I'm sure it has happened.
 

Kocicak

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Read this:


There are many reasons why sitting in the boards of other companies is not adviceable.
 

Mopetar

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Jan 31, 2011
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Did Su look for companies with security track records clearly worse than Intel or how did she end up there?
Or a company with security issues wanted someone from a company that isn’t known for them.

The logic goes in both directions and makes more sense as I’ve stated.
 
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Hitman928

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Read this:


There are many reasons why sitting in the boards of other companies is not adviceable.
Like I said, a successful CEO will always be asked to be on the board of another company. It's up to the CEO to determine if they want to do so and if one of the company's asking them is a good fit. The relationship should be mutually beneficial. Here's some examples from the tech industry.

Bob Swan (intel CEO) is on the board for Ebay.
Tim Cook (Apple CEO) is on the board for Nike.
Steve Sanghi (Microchip CEO) is on the board for Mellanox technologies.
Rich Templeton (TI CEO) is on the board for Catalyst.

I could go on and on. It may be less common than it was 10 years ago, but it is still very common today and in the tech industry it seems pretty pervasive. Every mid to large company I've worked for/with has a CEO of another company on their board or their CEO is on the board of another company.
 

Kocicak

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Like I said, a successful CEO will always be asked to be on the board of another company. It's up to the CEO to determine if they want to do so and if one of the company's asking them is a good fit. ...

Bob Swan (intel CEO) is on the board for Ebay.
Tim Cook (Apple CEO) is on the board for Nike.
...
At least from these two examples the other company runs in a different industry. Be on a board in the second company in the same industry smells moving ships more than just a "standard CEO thing" to me
 

Topweasel

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AMD offers 0 networking tools. All their board partners are using Realtek or Intel. There isn't a thing they compete in. If anything its more likely an opportunity for partnership (or at least getting them to look AMD's way with partnerships, even if fruitless). I mean everything is the same market if you look macro enough. Nike and Apple don't really sell the same stuff, but they are certainly both premium lifestyle products.
 

DrMrLordX

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what are you talking about? It's a board seat. CEOs of companies tend to hold many board seats at many other companies.
I learned this fact not too long ago. You would think a Board of Directors would be present or past executives brought up from within the company (or early founders), but no, that is not the case. Frequently, a public corporation's BoD consists of executives past and present from other corporations. And not all of the public.

And yes, Cisco is complementary to AMD (in a way), so it makes sense why Cisco would want her on their board (and vice versa).
 

moinmoin

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chrisjames61

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At least from these two examples the other company runs in a different industry. Be on a board in the second company in the same industry smells moving ships more than just a "standard CEO thing" to me

That isn't true at all. They aren't competitors. Cisco Systems and AMD have about as much in common as General Motors and Caterpillar Inc. Which is not much. It isn't like she is on the board of directors at another cpu or gpu manufacturer.
 
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itsmydamnation

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I guess my sarcasm (other network companies may have backdoors, Cisco repeatedly offers wide open frontdoors through remotely exploitable root access) was a little misplaced in this thread.
and also largely irrelevant.

Almost all the attack vectors are controllable and in any 1/2 decent designed network architecture if someone is in a position to exploit almost all the management plane vulnerabilities they already have the keys to the kingdom and there is little need to.
 

moinmoin

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and also largely irrelevant.

Almost all the attack vectors are controllable and in any 1/2 decent designed network architecture if someone is in a position to exploit almost all the management plane vulnerabilities they already have the keys to the kingdom and there is little need to.
If you say so.
 

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