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Ryzen 5 1600 Instability

Burak Canik

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Oct 26, 2017
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Okay so I've been using a Ryzen 5 1600 in my new system WITHOUT OC for about 3-4 months now. Today I got a BSOD (WHEA_UNCORRECTABLE_ERROR) while browsing in Firefox and since then I am anxiously trying to understand why it happened.

Also one or two days ago I was playing Dying Light and it crashed too. Not a BSOD, just the game crashed. Don't know if it's relevant. It hasn't crashed again though.

After BSOD, I ran Cinebench CPU test 10 times without letting the cpu cool down and it didn't crash.

Then I proceeded to a blend test on Prime95, I saw a max temp of 75C. I then got "Prime 95 has stopped working" error. Anxiety meter is through the frickin roof right now! CPU is not overclocked, it's running at stock speeds and Prime95 stops working. I can only hope that the cause is RAM OC.

System (as it exactly is and was when I got BSOD):
-Cpu: Ryzen 5 1600, NO OC, stock cooler.
-Motherboard: MSI B350 Tomahawk, Bios Version: 1.8
-Gpu: Asus GTX1080 Strix, NO OC.
-RAM: 16GB GSkill F4-3200C14-8GTZKY, 3200Mhz @ 1.35V (Just set it to 3200MHZ CL14 from Bios).
-SSD: Samsung 850 EVO 240GB
-HDD: Don't know, got it from my father's old laptop. HWINFO says "Seagate ST975042AS [750GB, 16MB]".
-PSU: Seasonic M12II Evo Edition.

Also, in the past months, none of my OC attempts were successful with this particular CPU, I can't even get it to work with 3.7GHz @1.35V (I didn't push it further than 1.35 volts with stock cooler). Seeing as people OC it with the stock cooler without any problems, and now that I got a BSOD out of nowhere, I'm starting to believe that I may have a faulty chip.

So what do I do ? How do I detect which hardware was faulty/responsible for BSOD ? It's been 3 hours since BSOD and I didn't have any more BSOD's yet. Can it be a one time thing ? I read somewhere that even a faulty flash driver might cause a BSOD. All help is appreciated, thanks in advance.
 

ZGR

Golden Member
Oct 26, 2012
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Try running Prime with the RAM set at 2400 MHz. But before you do that, your CPU voltages are all on auto?

When was the last time you updated your BIOS? You may have to manually enter the timings of your RAM.

Someone who owns Ryzen and 3200 Mhz CL14 will be able to provide far more detailed and useful info.
 
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Burak Canik

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Whoa that was a fast reply :D

CPU voltages are all on auto.
Last BIOS update was on 23 of September 2017. So a month ago. I upgraded to version 1.8 from 1.2.
By the way do you mean I should set it to 2400MHz and CL14 ?
 

IEC

Elite Member
Super Moderator
Jun 10, 2004
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You should run memtest or AIDA64 stress test on the memory first to rule that out.

If you get memory errors, try 1.38V on the vDIMM instead and see if that solves it. Some boards are picky and don't work at 3200 CL14 without a slight bump in vDIMM for whatever reason.
 
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Burak Canik

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Update: Did a memtest86 test for 1 hours and 40 minutes and ended the test prematurely during the second pass. Decided to use the computer for a couple of hours and put it to testing overnight. No errors were detected so far though.
 

Burak Canik

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Oct 26, 2017
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Did that. It couldn't find the dump file.

Crash dump directory: C:\Windows\Minidump

Crash dumps are enabled on your computer.

No valid crash dumps have been found on your computer
Previously it was set to write out minidumps. I set it to full dump but nevertheless I don't have a dump file at hand right now.
 

krumme

Diamond Member
Oct 9, 2009
5,920
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Did that. It couldn't find the dump file.



Previously it was set to write out minidumps. I set it to full dump but nevertheless I don't have a dump file at hand right now.
Yeaa but thats the procedure you have to follow.
Did it a year ago and found out the problem was the router of all things !! Lol
So diagnosis first.
 

EXCellR8

Diamond Member
Sep 1, 2010
3,887
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I would try running only one stick of memory, restore BIOS defaults (perhaps pull CMOS battery for a minute or so) and then manually enter voltage and timings for the one module... or use the performance profile.

I have the same board with the Ryzen 1500X and it worked out of the box with my 3200mhz DDR4 + the CPU OC'd @ 4.0ghz no problem. I'm not even sure my memory kit is on the QVL.
 

Burak Canik

Member
Oct 26, 2017
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0
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Yeaa but thats the procedure you have to follow.
Did it a year ago and found out the problem was the router of all things !! Lol
So diagnosis first.
I guess I'll never find out the cause of that BSOD if I don't get any more BSOD's right ?

I would try running only one stick of memory, restore BIOS defaults (perhaps pull CMOS battery for a minute or so) and then manually enter voltage and timings for the one module... or use the performance profile.

I have the same board with the Ryzen 1500X and it worked out of the box with my 3200mhz DDR4 + the CPU OC'd @ 4.0ghz no problem. I'm not even sure my memory kit is on the QVL.
Yeah I'll definitely give that a try. But first I want to see if there will be any errors on memtest86 overnight and then after 30 minutes of AIDA memory test. Then I'll try your solution.

By the way as someone who overclocked a 1500X to 4.0 GHz, do you think it's normal that for a 1600 to not even reach 3.7GHz with stock cooler ? I used Ryzen Master for OC and didn't increase the voltage more than 1.35 V.
 

krumme

Diamond Member
Oct 9, 2009
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I guess I'll never find out the cause of that BSOD if I don't get any more BSOD's right ?


Yeah I'll definitely give that a try. But first I want to see if there will be any errors on memtest86 overnight and then after 30 minutes of AIDA memory test. Then I'll try your solution.

By the way as someone who overclocked a 1500X to 4.0 GHz, do you think it's normal that for a 1600 to not even reach 3.7GHz with stock cooler ? I used Ryzen Master for OC and didn't increase the voltage more than 1.35 V.
To be frank unless you are hosting Trumps twitter account on your pc i wouldnt bother examine what the cause is.

You know. Sone of use grew up with stuff like windows 95 beta and if we reported each bsod online the climate change would be far worse.

Btw 3700 1.35 on 1600 sounds right. If you go 1.375 you will probably go 3800 but thats a stretch for the stock cooler.
 

Zenoth

Diamond Member
Jan 29, 2005
5,086
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I'm sort of doing a very, very small 'come back' to overclocking myself (coincidentally, with a Ryzen 5 1600 as well). I haven't yet OC'ed the CPU itself (although I did just try the OC Tuner option in the BIOS, activated it, restarted and * boom *, magically the CPU sits at 3.5Ghz; but I reverted the change, I'm not gonna get +30 FPS in my games with a 300Mhz OC on a modern CPU nor would it have been the case even 10 years ago). However, I DO want to, and almost have to overclock the Memory, due to how Ryzen (more than) loves high Memory frequency and how apparently one 'gimps' their system hard time if they just run Ryzen with a "mere" 2133Mhz Memory frequency (and I can attest, not only from my own results so far but from tests all over the web, it IS true that the overall system performance is significantly better by just going from default Memory speeds to "just" 2666 or 2933 or of course as high as 3200; it's more snappier, smoother, more responsive, just overall faster and games DO gain a pretty decent FPS boost).

With this said, what I've recently learned about Memory OC'ing with Ryzen is the following (and take this with a grain of salt, I'm no expert but I'll 'report' what I've read):

1) The absolute best memory (manufacturer) for Ryzen Memory OC'ing is apparently Samsung (the famous "B-die"). They're known to 'yield' the best results, and have the best potential out there (they're usually the ones that bring you to the Memory company's 'rated' timings at specific voltages out of the box). The other memory 'types' (Hynix, etc) are working, but they're the ones that you'll "fight" with most of the times and might even get 'stuck' at default speeds forever with those.

2) Apparently, there's a thing called 'Power Phase' to take in consideration on SOME motherboards (which ones exactly I don't know). When it's a problem, the known issues are: * You can't OC the Memory IF your CPU frequency runs above the "base" speed, and if it does with the default 'boost' frequency system then the Memory OC will 'fail' and it causes issues such as freezes, crashes, etc. * In those cases when the Power Phase issue pops-up, the only way to OC the Memory is to somehow manually make sure that the CPU runs at a FIXED speed and never, ever moves up from there (so basically turning the auto boost system off completely; in AMD's case I believe it's called Turbo Core or Turbo Boost and it's indeed possible to turn that thing off when need arises). Now, how does one actually identify if their motherboard model is 'affected' by the Power Phase-related issue... now that is one heck of a good question. On a side note, I've read about this issue on ONE single post and I can't remember on which forum it was (I think it was on HardOCP), and heard about it on one single YouTube video (about how the guy in question in the video couldn't OC his Memory at all whenever his CPU happened to be OC'ed manually or when he let it run with that Turbo system On).

3)
VDDCR SOC Voltage is sometimes * required * to be tempered with (increased) to attain stability with Memory OC'ing, even when regular RAM Voltage is increased (say, going with RAM voltage of often-rated 1.35v, but being unable to get past POST or still having instability issues; that's when SOC voltage comes into play, usually). I don't know much about SOC voltage yet (but there's a good amount of info about that one all over the place). I've literally read about SOME of that just today and yesterday (since I've finished building my system this very week). All I know is that as I type this (nice coincidence) I'm currently attempting to run my Memory at its 'rated' 3000Mhz speed. I've had minimal success so far, sometimes getting to the Desktop and staying there and doing my normal things for a while, until eventually I get instability and weird system behaviors and unresponsiveness issues.

However, my latest attempt (and I'm typing from my Desktop on that very attempt) was to leave the regular DRAM on Auto and JUST touch the SOC Voltage (always good to test things separately from each other, that way I know which one fails; if I had increased both and it failed I wouldn't have known which one would be the culprit). However, the SOC Voltage is a VERY risky territory, it's extremely sensitive from what I've read. Basically, do NOT, under any circumstances set that thing higher than 1.150v for safe 24/7 system use (and I've read that going below that mark is still recommended, to try and stay stable below 1.1xx is more than recommended, say something like 1.080, 1.020 instead, even below that if you're lucky enough). The gist is, from whatever default value your SOC is set to (usually around 0.9xxx volt), your increments should be minimal and done slowly, step by step with multiple reboots to test if necessary (suggested increments in my own ASUS BIOS is no more than 0.00625v, that's right). My own current voltage on SOC is set to 1.037 and so far it seems stable (or, stable enough to be in the Desktop and type this while listening to music and doing a Windows Defender system scan... only doing small things first, then doing with more potent tests like Prime95 and MemTest).

4)
With all this said, there IS one thing that stuck with me from all the way back when I used to actually overclock (years ago, back on my Intel Duo E6600). When you have a system crash, a game crash (or just screen freezes), or when you get a BSOD or "sudden" system unresponsiveness or screen flashes (or Monitor going dark with the GPU seemingly stopping out of nowhere even without any obvious overheating issues), etc. When that kinda stuff happens and you just KNOW it shouldn't have happened, AND, if you know your system IS actually overclocked in ANY way (CPU, Memory, both or separately), then the GOLDEN RULE that I forced on to myself at the time (and always payed back eventually) is to do a FULL CMOS clear of your BIOS, first. That's the absolute first step. You turn the system off completely, you physically unplug the power cord from your Power Supply, you remove the motherboard's Battery and you locate the two pins used for a CMOS reset and short them with something like the tip of a screwdriver (those two pins are usually shown on your motherboard's manual with actual step by step documentation on how to reset the CMOS). You let the mobo without its battery that way for something like a minute or two (the pins shorting part takes like 5 seconds).

When that part is done, you place the battery back in, restart your system and access the BIOS immediately (don't just go straight to the Desktop). From the now-reset BIOS, immediately go to your "Optimized Default" settings wherever they happen to be, and Load those Defaults settings (do NOT make any changes to your BIOS right after a CMOS clear, that's what a lot of people do right away but they always forget to load the Optimized Defaults first). THEN, after you do that and reset the system, you go back in your BIOS a second time and THEN from that point you can adjust things.

HOWEVER, in your specific case, you NEED to do that good ol' elimination process to find out what caused your crashing / freezing issues. You KNOW that your CPU isn't manually OC'ed, so leave that portion alone. But you KNOW that you did OC your Memory. So, with optimized defaults loaded, I'd highly recommended to LEAVE everything, and I do mean absolutely * everything * untouched, at default and stock values and go to the Desktop and do your normal daily use of your system first, for maybe 1 or 2 days. It's not a race, it's not a rush, there's no point to not want to do that; believe me, been there done that in the past, patience IS a key. Now, if NORMAL (non-stressed) use of your system seems fine (playing games, streaming maybe if you do, watching movies, listening to music, doing some multitasking, etc... normal stuff) and you experience no crash immediately, THEN start doing those stress tests, Prime95, etc. Do them overnight for a start (that's usually the amount of time recommended for a 'bare minimum', something like 8 to 12 hours). And then, if those tests ARE stable, at THAT point you should know that your Memory overclock indeed most likely WAS the culprit. But you do have to do the whole elminiation process by starting from square one (default, stock values on everything). Otherwise you'll perpetually stay in a state of not knowing which exact component(s) or which exact timing value(s) or which one of the voltage values would be responsible, and if you changed a grand total of 12+ things you'll NEVER, ever get out of that loop.

So yeah, step by step, isolating and small increments has always been keys in successful overclock AND in successful investigations in finding causes to my OC issues whenever they showed up. I do happen to be doing all of that again after all those years, albeit only for the Memory, but still... I'm in that boat again now. Hope any of this helps a bit.
 
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EXCellR8

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Sep 1, 2010
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By the way as someone who overclocked a 1500X to 4.0 GHz, do you think it's normal that for a 1600 to not even reach 3.7GHz with stock cooler ? I used Ryzen Master for OC and didn't increase the voltage more than 1.35 V.
Tough to say... I think the 1500X, as a quad core and not a hexacore, is a bit more suitable for OC--whereas the 1600 should be more powerful out of the box.

I'm not quite patient enough these days to deal with unstable OC (nor do I have much time to troubleshoot), but the B350 Tomahawk actually OC'd and was more stable than my initial MSI X370 board, and the X370 board I replaced that with.
 
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scannall

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Jan 1, 2012
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There are a number of threads around the internet tying that particular error to a Windows update bug. A clean install fixed it for just about all of them.
 

DaveSimmons

Elite Member
Aug 12, 2001
40,730
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It could also just be the programs.

I stopped using Firefox on my old work PC a couple of years ago because Firefox kept causing the AMD graphics driver to crash and recover. No BSODs, but it was the only app doing that at the time. This was an intel i7-2600 non-K at stock speed with I think a 6670.
 

Burak Canik

Member
Oct 26, 2017
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I'm sort of doing a very, very small 'come back' to overclocking myself (coincidentally, with a Ryzen 5 1600 as well). I haven't yet OC'ed the CPU itself (although I did just try the OC Tuner option in the BIOS, activated it, restarted and * boom *, magically the CPU sits at 3.5Ghz; but I reverted the change, I'm not gonna get +30 FPS in my games with a 300Mhz OC on a modern CPU nor would it have been the case even 10 years ago). However, I DO want to, and almost have to overclock the Memory, due to how Ryzen (more than) loves high Memory frequency and how apparently one 'gimps' their system hard time if they just run Ryzen with a "mere" 2133Mhz Memory frequency (and I can attest, not only from my own results so far but from tests all over the web, it IS true that the overall system performance is significantly better by just going from default Memory speeds to "just" 2666 or 2933 or of course as high as 3200; it's more snappier, smoother, more responsive, just overall faster and games DO gain a pretty decent FPS boost).

With this said, what I've recently learned about Memory OC'ing with Ryzen is the following (and take this with a grain of salt, I'm no expert but I'll 'report' what I've read):

1) The absolute best memory (manufacturer) for Ryzen Memory OC'ing is apparently Samsung (the famous "B-die"). They're known to 'yield' the best results, and have the best potential out there (they're usually the ones that bring you to the Memory company's 'rated' timings at specific voltages out of the box). The other memory 'types' (Hynix, etc) are working, but they're the ones that you'll "fight" with most of the times and might even get 'stuck' at default speeds forever with those.

2) Apparently, there's a thing called 'Power Phase' to take in consideration on SOME motherboards (which ones exactly I don't know). When it's a problem, the known issues are: * You can't OC the Memory IF your CPU frequency runs above the "base" speed, and if it does with the default 'boost' frequency system then the Memory OC will 'fail' and it causes issues such as freezes, crashes, etc. * In those cases when the Power Phase issue pops-up, the only way to OC the Memory is to somehow manually make sure that the CPU runs at a FIXED speed and never, ever moves up from there (so basically turning the auto boost system off completely; in AMD's case I believe it's called Turbo Core or Turbo Boost and it's indeed possible to turn that thing off when need arises). Now, how does one actually identify if their motherboard model is 'affected' by the Power Phase-related issue... now that is one heck of a good question. On a side note, I've read about this issue on ONE single post and I can't remember on which forum it was (I think it was on HardOCP), and heard about it on one single YouTube video (about how the guy in question in the video couldn't OC his Memory at all whenever his CPU happened to be OC'ed manually or when he let it run with that Turbo system On).

3)
VDDCR SOC Voltage is sometimes * required * to be tempered with (increased) to attain stability with Memory OC'ing, even when regular RAM Voltage is increased (say, going with RAM voltage of often-rated 1.35v, but being unable to get past POST or still having instability issues; that's when SOC voltage comes into play, usually). I don't know much about SOC voltage yet (but there's a good amount of info about that one all over the place). I've literally read about SOME of that just today and yesterday (since I've finished building my system this very week). All I know is that as I type this (nice coincidence) I'm currently attempting to run my Memory at its 'rated' 3000Mhz speed. I've had minimal success so far, sometimes getting to the Desktop and staying there and doing my normal things for a while, until eventually I get instability and weird system behaviors and unresponsiveness issues.

However, my latest attempt (and I'm typing from my Desktop on that very attempt) was to leave the regular DRAM on Auto and JUST touch the SOC Voltage (always good to test things separately from each other, that way I know which one fails; if I had increased both and it failed I wouldn't have known which one would be the culprit). However, the SOC Voltage is a VERY risky territory, it's extremely sensitive from what I've read. Basically, do NOT, under any circumstances set that thing higher than 1.150v for safe 24/7 system use (and I've read that going below that mark is still recommended, to try and stay stable below 1.1xx is more than recommended, say something like 1.080, 1.020 instead, even below that if you're lucky enough). The gist is, from whatever default value your SOC is set to (usually around 0.9xxx volt), your increments should be minimal and done slowly, step by step with multiple reboots to test if necessary (suggested increments in my own ASUS BIOS is no more than 0.00625v, that's right). My own current voltage on SOC is set to 1.037 and so far it seems stable (or, stable enough to be in the Desktop and type this while listening to music and doing a Windows Defender system scan... only doing small things first, then doing with more potent tests like Prime95 and MemTest).

4)
With all this said, there IS one thing that stuck with me from all the way back when I used to actually overclock (years ago, back on my Intel Duo E6600). When you have a system crash, a game crash (or just screen freezes), or when you get a BSOD or "sudden" system unresponsiveness or screen flashes (or Monitor going dark with the GPU seemingly stopping out of nowhere even without any obvious overheating issues), etc. When that kinda stuff happens and you just KNOW it shouldn't have happened, AND, if you know your system IS actually overclocked in ANY way (CPU, Memory, both or separately), then the GOLDEN RULE that I forced on to myself at the time (and always payed back eventually) is to do a FULL CMOS clear of your BIOS, first. That's the absolute first step. You turn the system off completely, you physically unplug the power cord from your Power Supply, you remove the motherboard's Battery and you locate the two pins used for a CMOS reset and short them with something like the tip of a screwdriver (those two pins are usually shown on your motherboard's manual with actual step by step documentation on how to reset the CMOS). You let the mobo without its battery that way for something like a minute or two (the pins shorting part takes like 5 seconds).

When that part is done, you place the battery back in, restart your system and access the BIOS immediately (don't just go straight to the Desktop). From the now-reset BIOS, immediately go to your "Optimized Default" settings wherever they happen to be, and Load those Defaults settings (do NOT make any changes to your BIOS right after a CMOS clear, that's what a lot of people do right away but they always forget to load the Optimized Defaults first). THEN, after you do that and reset the system, you go back in your BIOS a second time and THEN from that point you can adjust things.

HOWEVER, in your specific case, you NEED to do that good ol' elimination process to find out what caused your crashing / freezing issues. You KNOW that your CPU isn't manually OC'ed, so leave that portion alone. But you KNOW that you did OC your Memory. So, with optimized defaults loaded, I'd highly recommended to LEAVE everything, and I do mean absolutely * everything * untouched, at default and stock values and go to the Desktop and do your normal daily use of your system first, for maybe 1 or 2 days. It's not a race, it's not a rush, there's no point to not want to do that; believe me, been there done that in the past, patience IS a key. Now, if NORMAL (non-stressed) use of your system seems fine (playing games, streaming maybe if you do, watching movies, listening to music, doing some multitasking, etc... normal stuff) and you experience no crash immediately, THEN start doing those stress tests, Prime95, etc. Do them overnight for a start (that's usually the amount of time recommended for a 'bare minimum', something like 8 to 12 hours). And then, if those tests ARE stable, at THAT point you should know that your Memory overclock indeed most likely WAS the culprit. But you do have to do the whole elminiation process by starting from square one (default, stock values on everything). Otherwise you'll perpetually stay in a state of not knowing which exact component(s) or which exact timing value(s) or which one of the voltage values would be responsible, and if you changed a grand total of 12+ things you'll NEVER, ever get out of that loop.

So yeah, step by step, isolating and small increments has always been keys in successful overclock AND in successful investigations in finding causes to my OC issues whenever they showed up. I do happen to be doing all of that again after all those years, albeit only for the Memory, but still... I'm in that boat again now. Hope any of this helps a bit.
Dude that is the BIGGEST help I could've hope for, thank you for your time and patience, sharing your knowledge with me (us). I'll do the elimination process to isolate the culprit. I think its gonna be the ram OC, I got lots of research to do about RAM OC on Ryzen, SoC voltages etc. As you said, patience is key :)

There are a number of threads around the internet tying that particular error to a Windows update bug. A clean install fixed it for just about all of them.
I was hoping for OS or driver related cause as I too saw some people having the same issue because of those but knowing that I have OC'd my RAM and prime95 test crashed, I'm thinking it's not that simple. Might be though, Maybe BSOD happened because of Windows Update and Prime95 crashed because of OC who knows. Anyways I've not yet encountered another BSOD so I'm gonna go with the good ol' elimination process as Zenoth described. Thanks for the insight Scannall.

It could also just be the programs.

I stopped using Firefox on my old work PC a couple of years ago because Firefox kept causing the AMD graphics driver to crash and recover. No BSODs, but it was the only app doing that at the time. This was an intel i7-2600 non-K at stock speed with I think a 6670.
Might be yeah who knows, Ryzen is still new and Firefox crashes a lot since I don't know the beginning of time :)

To be frank unless you are hosting Trumps twitter account on your pc i wouldnt bother examine what the cause is.

You know. Sone of use grew up with stuff like windows 95 beta and if we reported each bsod online the climate change would be far worse.

Btw 3700 1.35 on 1600 sounds right. If you go 1.375 you will probably go 3800 but thats a stretch for the stock cooler.
Yeah I had my fair shair of BSOD's, not just blue ones, black ones too :) I'm not old enough to experience Windows 95 but I used 2000 and onwards. I didn't care much back then when I had an MX440 and P4 but I sure as hell do worry when I have a GTX1080 and Ryzen on the line. But who knows, as I said and it's been pointed out to me, BSOD might not even be relevant to my system's instability.
 

Burak Canik

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Oct 26, 2017
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Update: I left the pc on overnight to do some memtest86 tests. Set to 12 cores active and 20 passes so that it would do as much testing it can. When I woke up it had finished 8 passes and there were 0 errors. Thought my RAM was stable enough with 3200MHz CL14 @ 1.35V (OC setting G-SKILL says they managed to make it work with Ryzen). Left it on again with Prime95 running and left the home. When I came back, The pc was on the logon screen so it crashed and rebooted I think (at 4 hours or so). Gonna proceed with resetting CMOS.
 

Burak Canik

Member
Oct 26, 2017
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Tough to say... I think the 1500X, as a quad core and not a hexacore, is a bit more suitable for OC--whereas the 1600 should be more powerful out of the box.

I'm not quite patient enough these days to deal with unstable OC (nor do I have much time to troubleshoot), but the B350 Tomahawk actually OC'd and was more stable than my initial MSI X370 board, and the X370 board I replaced that with.
Interesting, so tomahawk is not as bad as I make it to be :) Bios updates for it were kinda slow, although it seems to be speeding up nowadays.
 

Zor Prime

Senior member
Nov 7, 1999
381
17
81
Bump up the DRAM voltage. It'll take 1.45v all day long, easy. Try 1.4 and see if it passes, begin reducing it to a happy place.
 

EXCellR8

Diamond Member
Sep 1, 2010
3,887
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Interesting, so tomahawk is not as bad as I make it to be :) Bios updates for it were kinda slow, although it seems to be speeding up nowadays.
I do remember the BIOS updates being a little slow, from USB drive. My board's the ARCTIC version, but it's identical from a hardware standpoint AFAIK. I'm only running 16GB (2x8GB) so that's a variable to consider.
 

Burak Canik

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I do remember the BIOS updates being a little slow, from USB drive. My board's the ARCTIC version, but it's identical from a hardware standpoint AFAIK. I'm only running 16GB (2x8GB) so that's a variable to consider.
By slow I meant that new versions were not coming as fast as other vendors I think. But they sped up. I updated to 1.8 last month and 1.9 is already out. Hope they keep up the pace, god knows ryzen needs some (more) RAM stability ASAP.
 

EXCellR8

Diamond Member
Sep 1, 2010
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The first Ryzen board I bought was the MSI X370 carbon and I got impatient so I ordered the ASRock with 1800X bundle and sold off the CPU. About a week later MSI released BIOS update which supposedly helped the issues but not running into anything with the B350 was much appreciated.

It's much better now than it was when the 7's first launched at the beginning of the year. Very few people could manage a stable system and only certain memory kits even worked beyond 2133mhz.
 

Burak Canik

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Oct 26, 2017
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The first Ryzen board I bought was the MSI X370 carbon and I got impatient so I ordered the ASRock with 1800X bundle and sold off the CPU. About a week later MSI released BIOS update which supposedly helped the issues but not running into anything with the B350 was much appreciated.

It's much better now than it was when the 7's first launched at the beginning of the year. Very few people could manage a stable system and only certain memory kits even worked beyond 2133mhz.
They certainly came a long way then :)

By the way I'm gonna reset to optimized default settings as Zenoth says but I have a question, is the CMOS reset necessary ? I read conflicting opinions on the forum about:
  • Removing/Not Removing battery.
  • Unplugging/Not unplugging PSU power cord.
  • Using a shortdriver is safe/unsafe.
MSI says (in my mobo's user manual) NOT to unplug the power cord, doesn't mention anything about the battery, and says to use a cap to short the pins but they don't include it and I don't have it.

So if it's not necessary I want to avoid it and just reset to optimized defaults in BIOS.
 

ASK THE COMMUNITY