Russia on brink of ... NOPE! Russia INVADES Ukraine!

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Muse

Lifer
Jul 11, 2001
37,880
8,338
136
Stugna P is I think 20-30K USD for a complete system, which is reusable except for the rocket and tube. On a per hit cost for basically anything its a screaming deal against targets that don't require more sophisticated approaches.
The thread explained (and a person can see it in the video and understand once explained) that the guy operating the launcher didn't point directly at the heli after launch until just before impact, then did, not giving the heli time to detect the laser beam and take evasive action. The missile evidently homes in on the reflected laser beam.
 

K1052

Elite Member
Aug 21, 2003
47,086
35,096
136
The thread explained (and a person can see it in the video and understand once explained) that the guy operating the launcher didn't point directly at the heli after launch until just before impact, then did, not giving the heli time to detect the laser beam and take evasive action. The missile evidently homes in on the reflected laser beam.

Yeah, that's the idea. Stugna operators seem to do this with ground targets often too in case vehicles have active protection systems like the Shtora-1.
 

[DHT]Osiris

Lifer
Dec 15, 2015
14,733
12,849
146
Yeah, that's the idea. Stugna operators seem to do this with ground targets often too in case vehicles have active protection systems like the Shtora-1.
Haha, I used to do this in HL deathmatch with the laser guided rocket launcher. Keep people from realizing you're firing at them until it's too late.
 
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K1052

Elite Member
Aug 21, 2003
47,086
35,096
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EU plans to ban coal imports from Russia. Companies will have a couple months to wind down contracts then that's it. Worth $4B a year.

This is the easiest bit to get rid of since they can just buy from Australia/US even though transport costs will be higher.
 

KMFJD

Lifer
Aug 11, 2005
29,751
44,146
136
Dedovshchina - a major problem within the Russian armed forces

Dedovshchina is the informal practice of hazing and abuse of junior conscripts historically in the Soviet Armed Forces and today in the Russian armed forces, Internal Troops, and to a much lesser extent FSB, Border Guards, as well as the military forces of certain former Soviet Republics. It consists of brutalization by more senior conscripts, NCOs, and officers.

Dedovshchina encompasses a variety of subordinating and humiliating activities undertaken by the junior ranks, from doing the chores of the senior ranks, to violent and sometimes deadly physical and psychological abuse, not unlike an extremely vicious form of bullying or torture, including sexual torture and rape. When not leaving the army seriously injured, conscripts can suffer serious mental trauma for their lifetime. It is often cited by former military personnel as a major source of poor morale.

Many young men are killed or commit suicide every year because of dedovshchina.The New York Times reported that in 2006 at least 292 Russian soldiers were killed by dedovshchina (although the Russian military only admits that 16 soldiers were directly murdered by acts of dedovshchina and claims that the rest committed suicide). The Times states: "On Aug. 4, it was announced by the chief military prosecutor that there had been 3,500 reports of abuse already this year (2006), compared with 2,798 in 2005". The BBC meanwhile reports that in 2007, 341 soldiers committed suicide, a 15% reduction on the previous year.

In 2012, a draftee from Chelyabinsk region, Ruslan Aiderkhanov, was tortured to death by his seniors. The one witness who was willing to testify against the alleged perpetrators, Danil Chalkin, was later found shot dead in his military base. A contract soldier, Alikbek Musabekov, was later arrested in this incident.

In 2019, according to the Russian military prosecutor office situation with dedovshchina is getting worse. Incidents of hazing in the army during 2019 have increased. 51,000 human rights violations and 1,521 sexual assault cases.
 

Roger Wilco

Diamond Member
Mar 20, 2017
3,969
5,843
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Russian comms are amusing.

Banquet 90 tries to ask Banquet 91 if they need to cook dinner in code, but 91 can’t understand him:

Banquet 90 gives up on talking to Banquet 91, doesn’t answer his yes/no question. He asks Strela to contact Banquet 91 instead. Only problem is Strela can’t understand him either. He ends up abandoning the code:

After all that, Banquet 91 asks for permission to return to base, but the other unit can’t hear him. His request goes unanswered:

Banquet 91 keeps making the request and getting no response. Ukrainian music is being played on that frequency.

Russian soldier attempts to troubleshoot his secure comms (tamara), and a Ukrainian from Chornobayivka promptly trolls him:

 
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K1052

Elite Member
Aug 21, 2003
47,086
35,096
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K1052

Elite Member
Aug 21, 2003
47,086
35,096
136
Too bad we can't send Abrams, far more capable in every metric (except fuel efficiency).

Yeah I don't think the Ukrainians want to learn how to take care of them in the middle of a war.

Maybe see if we've got some M1046s around. They already know how to take care of HMMWVs and the TOW is easy to learn.
 
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Ajay

Lifer
Jan 8, 2001
16,094
8,106
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Yeah I don't think the Ukrainians want to learn how to take care of them in the middle of a war.

Maybe see if we've got some M1046s around. They already know how to take care of HMMWVs and the TOW is easy to learn.
Yes. That's why I said it's too bad. Too much of a learn curve to get the most out of this tank. Maybe latter when the west helps them rebuilt their army, although, anti-platform weapons, as we are seeing with Javs and NLAWs and even drones are really changing the game.
 

fskimospy

Elite Member
Mar 10, 2006
84,932
49,645
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Yes. That's why I said it's too bad. Too much of a learn curve to get the most out of this tank. Maybe latter when the west helps them rebuilt their army, although, anti-platform weapons, as we are seeing with Javs and NLAWs and even drones are really changing the game.
I wonder how much better more modern tanks would do - it seems like the Russians are overwhelmingly losing their older tanks but I'm not sure if that's primarily due to their force composition or something else. Although also from what I've read Russian tactics are so poor that they are leaving themselves as sitting ducks by not deploying air assets or infantry screens, and their tanks largely lack advanced optics that would permit them to see these attacks coming better.

Anyways, no general here but this seems to be a mixture of new tech and Russian incompetence so an appropriately trained army with more modern armor may fare significantly better. No way to know though as US tanks didn't have to face advanced anti-armor weapons in Iraq or Afghanistan.
 
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K1052

Elite Member
Aug 21, 2003
47,086
35,096
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I wonder how much better more modern tanks would do - it seems like the Russians are overwhelmingly losing their older tanks but I'm not sure if that's primarily due to their force composition or something else. Although also from what I've read Russian tactics are so poor that they are leaving themselves as sitting ducks by not deploying air assets or infantry screens, and their tanks largely lack advanced optics that would permit them to see these attacks coming better.

Anyways, no general here but this seems to be a mixture of new tech and Russian incompetence so an appropriately trained army with more modern armor may fare significantly better. No way to know though as US tanks didn't have to face advanced anti-armor weapons in Iraq or Afghanistan.

On an even tank vs tank basis I'd sure really rather be in an Abrams than a T-72 which launches it's turret skyward killing the entire crew if you even glance at it crosswise.
 

mooncancook

Platinum Member
May 28, 2003
2,874
50
91
Too bad we can't send Abrams, far more capable in every metric (except fuel efficiency).
Eve if we could, their soldiers are not trained to operate and service the Abrams

Edit: looks like it's already been replied with the same idea