Running a mini marathon in approx 2 months

Discussion in 'Health and Fitness' started by TecHNooB, Feb 13, 2008.

  1. TecHNooB

    TecHNooB Diamond Member

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    So I've decided to run a mini marathon to spite my current roommate (he irks me to no end!). I have a little over 2 months to train. The total distance will be 13 miles. I've ran 4 miles a day for the past week. Will up it to 5 eventually and maybe some 2 hour runs 2 weeks before the actual marathon. My diet is fine. I eat mostly tilapia, chicken breast, oatmeal, grapefruit, lettuce, tomatoes, peanut butter sandwiches, and eggs. Anything else I should be doing?

    edit: Running the mini marathon was my roommate's idea. I'm tagging along to kick his ass lol~
     
  2. KeithTalent

    KeithTalent Administrator<br>Elite Member<br>Lifer
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    This is just what worked for me, so it may not for everyone,but I actually reduced the number of runs I did during the week and spent a bit more time on weight-training for my legs and it helped my endurance immensely.

    For example, instead of running 4-5 times per week I reduced down to only 3 (maximum) and made sure I did deadlifts, lunges, and other weight-training to help build the muscles in my legs. My running speed and endurance has increased dramatically from doing this. I also went swimming once a week just mix things up.

    Make sure you check out the route beforehand to see if you need to do any hill training. I had a 10K last year that was very hilly and knowing that beforehand really helped in my preparation.

    Good luck!

    KT
     
  3. Capt Caveman

    Capt Caveman Lifer

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    I know a lot of people use Running World's Smart Coach software to design training program. It allows you to input training schedule length, your current weekly mileage, etc to develop a training program for you.

    RW Smart Coach
     
  4. TecHNooB

    TecHNooB Diamond Member

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    Wow that program is nifty :) Thanks~
     
  5. SociallyChallenged

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    Definitely remember to carb load! I can't stress this enough, especially before long runs (you'll probably do a 10 miler before the race). Eat a ton of pasta a couple nights before the long runs and the race and that should help with your energy. I just thought I should mention that since it's so vital to endurance sports. :) Good luck btw! I meant to do a half marathon myself, but I never got to it.
     
  6. edcarman

    edcarman Member

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    This deserves a bit of emphasis. There is a common misconception that that carbo-loading means stuffing yourself with pasta the night before a race. This usually results only in indigestion.
    As mentioned, for proper carbo-loading you need to gradually increase your carb intake from around three days before the race. This is usually coupled with a decrease in the amount of training on these days. The net efect is that you might end up eating a couple of extra slices of bread each day rather than stuffing yourself to the point of discomfort.
     
  7. TecHNooB

    TecHNooB Diamond Member

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    What about carb loading during training? i've been keepin carbs pretty low as of late. Around 100-130 g. Haven't had a day where I ate more than 120 g yet. I'd love to chow down on some speghetti once a week tho :) I'm sort of in a mini-cutting phase and I thought combining that with this run would be a no-brainer. I tend to drop carbs during this period. Should I set aside one day per week to load up?
     
  8. Gamingphreek

    Gamingphreek Lifer

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    Half Marathon isn't that hard if you are smart about it.

    You have 2 months so I'll plan for right now and you can up it as it goes.

    Since you said you are doing 4 miles a day for the past week we can build off of that. Generally your running week should include 2 tempo runs, 1 distance run, 3 normal length runs and a day off (Unless you have extenuating circumstances).

    Sunday: Day off
    Monday: Normal Run (4 miles)
    Tuesday: Tempo Run (2 miles at 80-90 percent speed)
    Wednesday Distance Run (6-8 miles)
    Thursday : Normal Run (4 miles)
    Friday: Temp Run (2 miles at 8-90 percent speed)
    Saturday: Normal Run (4 miles)

    Generally you want to mix up your runs throughout the week so you don't have back to back tempo runs or back to back normal runs. You can go deeper into a schedule if you are serious about this running and do short and long instead of just normal. Keep the day off as you progress.

    Since you have 2 months (roughly 8 weeks) up your runs by a mile every other week and by 2 miles on the last week. This should result in normal runs of around 9 miles which is what you are generally going to be looking for when running Half-Marathons.

    -Kevin
     
  9. TecHNooB

    TecHNooB Diamond Member

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    Hm.. I planned on taking wednesdays and sundays off. I will reduce my days off to 1 after next week once my body gets used to the runs (need more repair time :p). For tempo runs, when you say 90 percent speed, do you mean 90 percent compared to your normal run? I take it you are supposed to run faster in a tempo run. Not exactly sure what you mean by 80-90. Great info though, thanks~

     
  10. edcarman

    edcarman Member

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    Carb loading is really something you do to build up extra energy stores before an event to ensure that you do not run out of energy during the event. You don't really need to be doing pure carb loading during training.

    That said, you need carbs in your diet (especially if you're doing lots of running). They are the most effective way of replenshing you muscles' glycogen (fuel) stores after training. IIRC, the guideline is around 70% energy from carbs, 15% from protein and 15% from fat. This works out to 76g carbs, 17g protein and 7g fat for every 100g of food.

    In the end, the normal guidelines apply for weight loss: take in less energy over the week than you burn. If you want that pasta, you need to compensate by training a bit harder or by eating a bit less on the other six days.

    Taking two rest days a week is not necessarily a bad thing - it depends on what your training sessions look like. Another tip is to base your running sessions on time, rather than distance. Your body's response to training is determined by the length of time you spend at the given intensity. For example:

    Running 60min up a hill vs. 60min on the flat at the same HR will have the same effect on your overall fitness even though the first will be a shorter distance than the second. There will be different effects on what muscle fibres are used, but that is perhaps a topic for another day.
    As you get fitter, you will start to lengthen your training sessions. As a consequence of this, and your improved fitness, you distances will automatically increase.

    An example of this in practice is this cycling program (numbers in bracket indicate Week 1 sessions):

    Week 7
    Mon: Off (same)
    Tue: 3x15min intervals at 95-105% FTHR (2x20min) - 90min with warmup and cooldown
    Wed: Tempo ride 90min 85-95% (same)
    Thurs: Tempo ride 90min 85-95% (same)
    Fri: Off (same)
    Sat: 4hr race pace ride at 90% (3hr 80-85%)
    Sun: 3hr endurance ride 75-80% (2hr 75%)

    As you can see, total time has increased from 9:30 to 11:30 and the time at higher intensities has also increased. There are also 2 rest days each week. The training actually goes in phases with length and intensity building over 3 weeks, followed by fourth rest week that has four rest days.

    The intensities are a percentage of Functional Threshold Heart Rate. FTHR can be described as your average HR over a 60 minute time trial while you're being chased by a mad hillbilly driving a pickup and wielding a shotgun.
    Since this is hard to measure (due to the need to first find and then piss off a hillbilly), it is usually taken as your average HR over a 20min flatout time trial.
    I presume a similar idea would apply to running intensities.
     
  11. TecHNooB

    TecHNooB Diamond Member

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    I'm pretty much following gamingphreek's outline except my distance run is on saturday. I'm thinkin about doing something like this:

    Mon - Norm run
    Tues - Tempo
    Wed - Norm run
    Thur - Tempo
    Fri - Rest
    Sat - Dist Run
    Sun - Tempo

    Plan on chowing down on spaghetti friday and saturday mornings.
     
  12. SWScorch

    SWScorch Diamond Member

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    You've gotten decent advice so far so I won't add much of anything else except to say that your long run should probably be 10-12 miles, and should reach that distance at least 3 weeks prior to the race. Then drop it down in the weeks leading to the race. Tempo runs are good; I'd suggest going for 20-40 minutes though at a "comfortably hard" effort. This usually means the pace you could hold for about an hour, slowing slightly for overall pace as the tempo runs get longer. Some long track intervals wouldn't hurt either, stuff like 800s or 1000s with at least a lap jog for recovery in between. These should be around 5K pace, or fast enough that you're winded by the end but not so fast that you couldn't do 5 or 6 of them. Throw those in every other week or so for a good workout. Also, make sure you stretch after running and that you warm up for at least 10 minutes and do some light stretching before workouts. that's about all I can say here; just be smart, don't overdo it and good luck!! :D