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Right-wing mainstream political cartoonist Ben Garrison comes out as a full on anti-vaxxer

ch33zw1z

Lifer
Nov 4, 2004
27,639
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Yea, cuz nothing's been learned in 400 years. Gotta wonder how many mindless cunts will eat this up.
 
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brycejones

Lifer
Oct 18, 2005
17,061
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Yea, cuz nothing's been learned in 400 years. Gotta wonder how many mindless cunts will eat this up.
The same mindless fools who post his political cartoons would be my guess.

I used to give Garrison the benefit of the doubt that he was just trolling conservatives and making money off of their stupidity. I can't do that anymore, dude is a full on whack job.
 
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Meghan54

Diamond Member
Oct 18, 2009
9,035
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The best part is that leeches are still used today, very effectively, in certain applications.

Science and shit.

Amazing, isn't it? "Worse" still...maggots are used today for wound debridment, esp. on burns. Ain't science a bitch? ;)
 
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cytg111

Lifer
Mar 17, 2008
11,875
2,981
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We have such capacity for logic, deduction ... but the ape has to be taught or its bat shit Alex Jones.

I dont believe in science cause science was wrong at some point. Is fucking retarded.
 
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K1052

Lifer
Aug 21, 2003
31,956
5,173
126
Crazy that I'm actually going to need to inquire with my doc about what boosters I can get/might need for shit that should have been eradicated in the US. Like climate denialists should be exiled to sea level land anti-vaxxers should be isolated to colonies where they can practice this insanity without risk to the rest of us.
 

child of wonder

Diamond Member
Aug 31, 2006
8,310
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I wonder what his religious affiliation is? Being right wing I'd assume Christian but I've been noticing that anti-vaxx, flat earthers, etc. tend to be atheist, agnostic, or not actively involved enough in their religion to be considered strong adherents.

It's almost like human beings HAVE to believe in something bigger than themselves, even the outlandish, and attempt to propagate it in order to feel important or valuable. Absent religion these conspiracy theories are logical replacements.
 

fleshconsumed

Diamond Member
Feb 21, 2002
5,725
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The idea behind this cartoon is monumentally stupid. The premise is that settled science is never truly settled and therefore cannot be trusted. Has any of the anti-vaxxers or even people who find this cartoon funny ever flown on an airplane? Why do they trust the science behind the airplanes? Isn't it settled science and therefore cannot be trusted?

As I said, this whole thing is profoundly stupid. Do they not teach logic and critical thinking in school anymore?
 
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[DHT]Osiris

Diamond Member
Dec 15, 2015
7,083
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I wonder what his religious affiliation is? Being right wing I'd assume Christian but I've been noticing that anti-vaxx, flat earthers, etc. tend to be atheist, agnostic, or not actively involved enough in their religion to be considered strong adherents.

It's almost like human beings HAVE to believe in something bigger than themselves, even the outlandish, and attempt to propagate it in order to feel important or valuable. Absent religion these conspiracy theories are logical replacements.
No, some people are just superstitious, and they'll believe either a magical man in the sky, or magical conspiracy theories. Human being's don't *have* to believe in these things, just dumb/illogical ones. I'm not religious nor do I believe in conspiracy theories.
 
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UNCjigga

Lifer
Dec 12, 2000
21,445
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Well isn't that just hilarious--batshit right wingers, orthodox Jews, and Hollywood vegan granola elites finally have something they can agree on.
 

pmv

Diamond Member
May 30, 2008
5,737
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I wonder what his religious affiliation is? Being right wing I'd assume Christian but I've been noticing that anti-vaxx, flat earthers, etc. tend to be atheist, agnostic, or not actively involved enough in their religion to be considered strong adherents.

It's almost like human beings HAVE to believe in something bigger than themselves, even the outlandish, and attempt to propagate it in order to feel important or valuable. Absent religion these conspiracy theories are logical replacements.
I don't see that that is true at all. I mean, that's just the GK Chesterton quotation ('a man who stops believing in God doesn't believe in nothing, he believers in almost anything', or something like that) and I've never found that very convincing. Where's your data? As far as I can see religious people are every bit as prone to have other odd beliefs or superstitions as the non-religious. Huge numbers of conspiracy theorists are Christians or Muslims, for example.

I do think its probably impossible to live without any illusions or without taking some things 'on faith'. Nobody is completely rational - Mr Spock would have trouble justifying getting out of bed in the morning or finding a logical reason to go on drawing breath. You'd go mad trying to ground every one of your ideas rigorously. Too much reason probably leads to depression, is my theory. So I sort-of agree that nobody is a perfect embodiment of rationality. But that's not the same thing you are saying.
 

child of wonder

Diamond Member
Aug 31, 2006
8,310
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No, some people are just superstitious, and they'll believe either a magical man in the sky, or magical conspiracy theories. Human being's don't *have* to believe in these things, just dumb/illogical ones. I'm not religious nor do I believe in conspiracy theories.
It could be attributed to superstition but I wonder if it's more than that. I'm an atheist that doesn't believe in weird conspiracy theories either but I am seeing more and more that do.

I don't see that that is true at all. I mean, that's just the GK Chesterton quotation ('a man who stops believing in God doesn't believe in nothing, he believers in almost anything', or something like that) and I've never found that very convincing. Where's your data? As far as I can see religious people are every bit as prone to have other odd beliefs or superstitions as the non-religious. Huge numbers of conspiracy theorists are Christians or Muslims, for example.

I do think its probably impossible to live without any illusions or without taking some things 'on faith'. Nobody is completely rational - Mr Spock would have trouble justifying getting out of bed in the morning or finding a logical reason to go on drawing breath. You'd go mad trying to ground every one of your ideas rigorously. Too much reason probably leads to depression, is my theory. So I sort-of agree that nobody is a perfect embodiment of rationality. But that's not the same thing you are saying.
Data is solely anecdotal. I was on the board of directors of a decent sized atheist organization and still participate in person and on social media with it and I'm seeing more and more of them devoting themselves to wacky theories or far left political activism. We have two flat-earthers and 6 anti-vaxxers that I know of where there were none I knew of 5 years ago.

I could be completely off base but I know one of the hardest parts of leaving religion for many is the emptiness left behind in having faith in "something."

Still, I could be completely wrong as my anecdotal experience doesn't amount to a hill of beans. Just trying to make sense of what I've seen.
 

cytg111

Lifer
Mar 17, 2008
11,875
2,981
136
I don't see that that is true at all. I mean, that's just the GK Chesterton quotation ('a man who stops believing in God doesn't believe in nothing, he believers in almost anything', or something like that) and I've never found that very convincing. Where's your data? As far as I can see religious people are every bit as prone to have other odd beliefs or superstitions as the non-religious. Huge numbers of conspiracy theorists are Christians or Muslims, for example.

I do think its probably impossible to live without any illusions or without taking some things 'on faith'. Nobody is completely rational - Mr Spock would have trouble justifying getting out of bed in the morning or finding a logical reason to go on drawing breath. You'd go mad trying to ground every one of your ideas rigorously. Too much reason probably leads to depression, is my theory. So I sort-of agree that nobody is a perfect embodiment of rationality. But that's not the same thing you are saying.
I dont know about that, I was raised as an atheist, transitioned to agnostic(cause science) and again transitioned to something else, I have faith I have seen the purpose of our existence, what came before and what must come after, death is not the end for there never was a beginning. Yet I am not depressed! (though If I try and impose my belief onto others it do seem to carry a depressive momentum - so I dont do that anymore. maybe you are right.)
 

[DHT]Osiris

Diamond Member
Dec 15, 2015
7,083
2,850
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It could be attributed to superstition but I wonder if it's more than that. I'm an atheist that doesn't believe in weird conspiracy theories either but I am seeing more and more that do.
So why not just assume they're idiots and move on, rather than stating that you believe there's, dare I say, a conspiracy of humanity's requirement of a belief in a greater power?

You literally fell into what you described.
 

child of wonder

Diamond Member
Aug 31, 2006
8,310
175
106
So why not just assume they're idiots and move on, rather than stating that you believe there's, dare I say, a conspiracy of humanity's requirement of a belief in a greater power?

You literally fell into what you described.
Ha! Maybe I did. But I'm looking at it as more of human nature than a conspiracy per se.
 

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