Repairing a 2005 toshiba laptop

FlashG

Platinum Member
Dec 23, 1999
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I have a shade tree knoweledge of desktop computers but haven't tried fixing a laptop. My son says that I can't fix his 2005 Toshiba satellite because they can't be repaired. Balderdash I say!. I don't have any information on his machine other than it overheated frequently, the fans wont run so he thinks the hd is fried.

I think it might just need to be cleaned out and maybe the memory checked. If the hd is dead how hard wiuld it be to replace and where can I get parts? I read that on some P4 models the mb connection could be bad from overheating but it still might be repairable. I like a challenge and I might save us $ if I can fix it.

What say you?
 

IlllI

Diamond Member
Feb 12, 2002
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could either be a cheap fix
or an expensive fix

depends on what the problem is

what happens if its not the hd? you could end up spending $$$ in just guesses

 

mpilchfamily

Diamond Member
Jun 11, 2007
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You mentioned heating issues. The fans may have died and i'm sure there is a good bit of dust in the system. But what makes you think its the HDD?

The hardest part of fixing a laptop is taking it apart and putting it back together correctly.
 

lxskllr

No Lifer
Nov 30, 2004
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Originally posted by: mpilchfamily

The hardest part of fixing a laptop is taking it apart and putting it back together correctly.

That, and parts. If it's more than replacing a fan, or re-seating some heatsinks, I think it's generally not worth it. I always end up with extra screws after working on laptops :^D

 

FlashG

Platinum Member
Dec 23, 1999
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Originally posted by: mpilchfamily
You mentioned heating issues. The fans may have died and i'm sure there is a good bit of dust in the system. But what makes you think its the HDD?

The hardest part of fixing a laptop is taking it apart and putting it back together correctly.

Defective hd is my son's idea. I think it just needs to be cleaned out.

Are you familiar with any how-to sights that show noobs how to correctly replace laptops? Specifically Toshibas.
 

lxskllr

No Lifer
Nov 30, 2004
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I'd Google it. I'm not familiar with any sites in particular. You can get a lot of dust out by blowing compressed air through the cooling slots. A HD is generally easy to replace. A couple of screws, and a small hatch opens giving you access.
 

mpilchfamily

Diamond Member
Jun 11, 2007
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Every laptop brand and even the differnt models of the brands are put together differently. The cases snap topgether differently and the screw locations will be all over the place. Half the battle is getting the keyboard disconected without damage. There have been very few laptops that i've taken apart that i havn't messed up the KB on. I'll get everything back together OK just to find that several keys no longer work.

Considering the unit is 3 years old i'd say its not worth trying to repair. Just replace it.
 

corkyg

Elite Member | Peripherals
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Mar 4, 2000
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Do NOT blow compressed air through the cooling slots. That simply forces the dirt farther in to the cramped interior spce in a laptop. Instead, get a vacuum crevice tool and suck the dirt out.

You can verify the HDD by removing it and putting it into an external USB case, then connect it to a desktop's USB port and testing it.

Every laptop is different. Most have the HDD mounted in a sled or caddy. That is easily removed. Then there are usually 4 screws to remove the bare HDD from that carrier.

Some memory can be accessed through covers on the bottom. IBM/Lenovo memory reqwures lifting of the keyboard, but they provide instructions for doing that. Most all laptopss CPU and GPU is under the keyboard.

As stated above, keyboard removal is sometimes tricky with screws and clips.

If the case fan is dead, then that can be replaced, but not easily. That is easy to check - a slight and gentle warm breeze will come out of the cooling vents when on.

Many laptops bring cool air in through the keyboard, and closing the screen cover while the laptop is on can cause over heating.

You may find more disassembly info here:

Toshiba
 

lxskllr

No Lifer
Nov 30, 2004
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Originally posted by: corkyg
Do NOT blow compressed air through the cooling slots. That simply forces the dirt farther in to the cramped interior spce in a laptop. Instead, get a vacuum crevice tool and suck the dirt out.

I don't know... I never had an issue with it. As long as you blow in the natural wind path, it should work ok. My Dell laptop I had was used on construction sites for 2 years before I disassembled it. I'd blow it out every so often, and when I finally broke it down, it was neat as a pin inside.

 

corkyg

Elite Member | Peripherals
Super Moderator
Mar 4, 2000
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That is the point. The air vents on a laptop are where hot air exits. The intake is generally through the keyboard. In general, all blowing does is scatter the dust someplace else - it doesn't get rid of it. It is like sweeping dirt under the rug. :)
 

lxskllr

No Lifer
Nov 30, 2004
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Mine brought fresh air in through the side and bottom, and expelled it out the back.
 

TheStu

Moderator<br>Mobile Devices & Gadgets
Moderator
Sep 15, 2004
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Originally posted by: lxskllr
Originally posted by: mpilchfamily

The hardest part of fixing a laptop is taking it apart and putting it back together correctly.

That, and parts. If it's more than replacing a fan, or re-seating some heatsinks, I think it's generally not worth it. I always end up with extra screws after working on laptops :^D

That just means you put it back together more efficiently. The last time I took apart my MacBook I every place was properly secured with a screw but I still had 2-3 left over (the first time that had ever happened actually after all the times that I had dismantled my macBook).

One screw from the side I intentionally left out since it was such a pain to get out.

If you (the OP) go slowly, take your time, and keep the screws separated, you should be fine.
 

aceO07

Diamond Member
Nov 6, 2000
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What error messages are you getting? Are there any lights or beeps? Any whirrring or other sounds? That's where I would start.

Also, if you had an external 2.5" drive case you could check if it's the harddrive that's dead. Also, it'd help you to retrieve the data if the drive is fine.