Redesigned NES Analogue Nt Now Available for Pre-Order

MentalIlness

Platinum Member
Nov 22, 2009
2,383
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http://www.ign.com/articles/2014/05/05/redesigned-nes-analogue-nt-now-available-for-pre-order

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http://www.ign.com/videos/2014/05/0...-look-awesome-on-your-new-tv-ign-conversation

Analogue Interactive, known for its walnut and ash Neo Geo systems and Analogue Neo Geo arcade sticks, has started taking preorders for its latest creation, the Analogue Nt.


The Analogue Nt is machined from a single block of 6061 aluminum alloy, and inside that smooth metal shell lies the soul of old-school Nintendo. Built with the same CPU used in the NES and Famicom, "the Analogue Nt is the only NES on the market that is built with original hardware," says Analogue Interactive's website.


The machine plays original NES game cartridges, as well as Famicom carts, and accepts all original NES and Famicom add-ons, including original controllers, zappers, and even less well-known peripherals like the Famicom 3D System.


As Chris Taber, Analogue's owner, explained, the Analogue Nt is an RGB NES, so "it outputs literally the highest quality analog video signals possible. This translates to perfect compatibility with modern TVs while retaining compatibility with old school CRTs, and high quality monitors."


The system doesn't come cheap, however. At $500 USD, this seems to be a machine built for only the most dedicated and hardcore retro gaming purists. For an additional $50, retro enthusiasts can have their Analgue Nt in their choice of four anodized colors, red, blue, black or pink.

Ummm...OK :confused:
 
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exdeath

Lifer
Jan 29, 2004
13,679
10
81
Built with original parts? Original NES was a native NTSC device. The color palette of the NES PPU is selected and defined by discrete NTSC color phase shifts. So how is this RGB? It's either one or the other.
 

Soundmanred

Lifer
Oct 26, 2006
10,784
6
81
*Built with original parts*

doesnt say its ALL original parts
Yeah, that's how I read it. I think the point they were trying to make was that it's not a crappy emulation based machine like so many neo-retro consoles, so everything is compatible.
 

Rakehellion

Lifer
Jan 15, 2013
12,182
35
91
Who's the target audience for this?

"Purists" will get a real NES from the pawn shop and not an overpriced replica. This thing has no technical or aesthetic merit.
 

KB

Diamond Member
Nov 8, 1999
5,396
383
126
Who's the target audience for this?

"Purists" will get a real NES from the pawn shop and not an overpriced replica. This thing has no technical or aesthetic merit.

But when those "purists" want to actually play their games, instead of blow on them and re-insert them all day to get them working, they might play them on this. But still at $500 bucks thats expensive for only one system. The Retron 5 plays 5 systems and is cheaper.

http://www.thinkgeek.com/product/16f...FdRQOgodGmwAZQ
 

exdeath

Lifer
Jan 29, 2004
13,679
10
81
I don't have to blow in any of my NES carts or systems. I've repaired them to work properly.

I have one that is so good the you don't even have to press down on the cart. Push down, up, side to side, while the game is running and nothing happens.
 

mmntech

Lifer
Sep 20, 2007
17,504
12
0
Built with original parts? Original NES was a native NTSC device. The color palette of the NES PPU is selected and defined by discrete NTSC color phase shifts. So how is this RGB? It's either one or the other.

*Built with original parts*

doesnt say its ALL original parts

The article just states it uses the original CPU. So either a Ricoh 2A03 or another MOS 6502 variant. I believe the Picture Processing Unit (PPU) is a separate chip. So they're probably not using an original one to get RGB output.

Which means this isn't entirely original NES hardware.

You'd have to have rocks in your heads to pay $500 for a 30 year old console anyway. I understand that a lot of the originals are going to wear out eventually. But still... Must be a lot of folks with more money than brains.
 

poofyhairguy

Lifer
Nov 20, 2005
14,612
318
126
Built with original parts? Original NES was a native NTSC device. The color palette of the NES PPU is selected and defined by discrete NTSC color phase shifts. So how is this RGB? It's either one or the other.

Could be a PlayChoice-10 PPU.
 

KB

Diamond Member
Nov 8, 1999
5,396
383
126
I don't have to blow in any of my NES carts or systems. I've repaired them to work properly.

I have one that is so good the you don't even have to press down on the cart. Push down, up, side to side, while the game is running and nothing happens.

Thats pretty sweet. I had a NES and two friends had NESes and we all eventually ran into the same problems. Had to blow on the cartridges more and more. And if you so much as shook the ground near the thing it would freeze. Mine got so bad I could only play games using the game genie. I took good care of the thing too. So many days having to restart Double Dragon, Mega Man, Blaster Master, Super Mario 3 because it hung near the last level. God life was tough before saves.
 

exdeath

Lifer
Jan 29, 2004
13,679
10
81
Thats pretty sweet. I had a NES and two friends had NESes and we all eventually ran into the same problems. Had to blow on the cartridges more and more. And if you so much as shook the ground near the thing it would freeze. Mine got so bad I could only play games using the game genie. I took good care of the thing too. So many days having to restart Double Dragon, Mega Man, Blaster Master, Super Mario 3 because it hung near the last level. God life was tough before saves.

Blowing does nothing. When it works it's random coincidence. If anything the humidity acts as a solvent on the tarnish which dries again.

The root of the problem is a combination of improper tension in the female socket pins and the ZIF action not allowing natural scraping action and cleaning of contacts you normally get. If the pins are worn and bent it doesn't matter how clean the cartridge is. So eventually even blowing and wiggling fails.

What I figured out at 8 yrs old is put the cart in, lock it down. Power on. Blinking, no title screen. Slide cart in and out side to side WHILE down and powered on. When you see the title screen but it's still blinking, hit reset, done. Was kinda hard to do because you could barely get to the cart while it was down and it was a tight fit in the surrounding plastic.

Always enjoyed watching friends, cousins, etc blowing harder and harder in futility then jumping in, walking the loaded cart under tension, bam play games.

This method was nerve wrecking for early battery powered games though that didn't have a mapper that disabled writes to SRAM on reset/power loss.
 
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exdeath

Lifer
Jan 29, 2004
13,679
10
81
Red blinking light of doom ought to be a mandatory rite of passage for kids still.

Spoiled casual kids these days. SHOW me how dedicated and persistent you are to play today!

As bad as it is, its one of my fondest childhood memories. You EARNED that 6 hour Zelda or Dragon Warrior session after fighting with blinking red light of death for 10 minutes. Maybe because it was when video games where still kids toys and how to get a NES cart playing was one of those special secret things only kids knew and no mom or dad could help you with.
 
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JD50

Lifer
Sep 4, 2005
11,633
2,025
126
exdeath didn't you say that you have a super everdrive? I'm considering getting one. I absolutely love using the original hardware and carts, but I'm getting tired of dealing with passwords and stuff.
 

exdeath

Lifer
Jan 29, 2004
13,679
10
81
Oh nice. Yeah there have been numerous theoretical ways. One is to have an FPGA capture the composite output, analyze the VERY discrete and seperated phase shifts used to select distinct colors I in the NTSC signal, then output a RGB signal with the correct and exact NTSC phase angle to RGB weighting

This is possible because NES only outputs a distinct small set of colors which ARE natively defined as NTSC color space, and even a dirty signal the difference between the two closest signals is easy to see even with a noisy dirty signal.

Others go as far as implementing an entire RGB PPU with actual pallete RAM in FPGA.

Have not seen anything implemented before now.
 
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exdeath

Lifer
Jan 29, 2004
13,679
10
81
exdeath didn't you say that you have a super everdrive? I'm considering getting one. I absolutely love using the original hardware and carts, but I'm getting tired of dealing with passwords and stuff.

Super Everdrive is for Super NES. But there is now a NES Everdrive and also the PowerPak for NES.

It just lets you run cart dumps on native hardware instead of emulators, it doesn't change the ROM. If a game uses passwords and doesn't have SRAM, you'll still have to deal with passwords.

There are save state mappers but I don't recall any ability to store/load save states from storage and it's not the same thing as real SRAM save slots in game.

Without promoting blatant piracy, I will say with current prices and collector status of old carts and being out of print for 20 years, it's the only way many can play these games on their native platforms.

Primary useful applications other than just hoarding ROMs:

1) save wear and tear and risk on your complete in box games.

2) ability to play fan patched and translated games never released here on native hardware. You've not lived until you've played Star Ocean, Tales of Phantasia, Bahamut Lagoon, Final Fantasy IV, Final Fantasy V, Terranigma, Seiken Densetsu 3, and MANY MORE in English on an American SNES.

3) not have to deal with replacing batteries and lost saves and long term storage of saves as files

4) speed and convenience of switching games
 
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slag

Lifer
Dec 14, 2000
10,473
81
101
Blowing does nothing. When it works it's random coincidence. If anything the humidity acts as a solvent on the tarnish which dries again.

The root of the problem is a combination of improper tension in the female socket pins and the ZIF action not allowing natural scraping action and cleaning of contacts you normally get. If the pins are worn and bent it doesn't matter how clean the cartridge is. So eventually even blowing and wiggling fails.

What I figured out at 8 yrs old is put the cart in, lock it down. Power on. Blinking, no title screen. Slide cart in and out side to side WHILE down and powered on. When you see the title screen but it's still blinking, hit reset, done. Was kinda hard to do because you could barely get to the cart while it was down and it was a tight fit in the surrounding plastic.

Always enjoyed watching friends, cousins, etc blowing harder and harder in futility then jumping in, walking the loaded cart under tension, bam play games.

This method was nerve wrecking for early battery powered games though that didn't have a mapper that disabled writes to SRAM on reset/power loss.

I used to fix these for people back before the slot cleaners came out and whatnot by taking the unit apart, pulling the part out the cartridge plugged into, and cleaned it. I'd then gently and slightly bend the tabs back up so they made good contact again. I fixed many consoles back then before it was common knowledge on how to do it. the slot cleaner devices didn't really fix the problem because the issue was the tension on the metal tabs that the cart pressed against.
 

ElFenix

Elite Member
Super Moderator
Mar 20, 2000
102,414
8,356
126
I don't have to blow in any of my NES carts or systems. I've repaired them to work properly.

I have one that is so good the you don't even have to press down on the cart. Push down, up, side to side, while the game is running and nothing happens.

how does one do this?

<--- has a non-functioning NES
 

exdeath

Lifer
Jan 29, 2004
13,679
10
81
how does one do this?

<--- has a non-functioning NES

Pull the 72 pin out, bend each matted down pin of the bottom row upward with a small screwdriver or blade making sure they are all level and uniform and with the right curvature and "springiness". Contacts should form arcs from the bend root, not sharp creased triangles. Swab and buff the gold plated tips with non abrasive but firm material like leather or foam.

Requires trial and error and experience to know how much to bend. You don't want to make it so tight you cant insert or remove the cart. Should feel slight engagement but otherwise smooth and lacking resistance and grit.

Also dismantling the carts and buffing the card edge connectors to mirror shine. Even if they aren't black with carbon, the shiny metal game pak contacts dull and oxidize over time and conduct poorly, might as well coat them in epoxy.
 
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MrPickins

Diamond Member
May 24, 2003
9,015
578
126
Pull the 72 pin out, bend each matted down pin of the bottom row upward with a small screwdriver or blade making sure they are all level and uniform and with the right curvature and "springiness". Contacts should form arcs from the bend root, not sharp creased triangles. Swab and buff the gold plated tips with non abrasive but firm material like leather or foam.

Requires trial and error and experience to know how much to bend. You don't want to make it so tight you cant insert or remove the cart. Should feel slight engagement but otherwise smooth and lacking resistance and grit.

Also dismantling the carts and buffing the card edge connectors to mirror shine. Even if they aren't black with carbon, the shiny metal game pak contacts dull and oxidize over time and conduct poorly, might as well coat them in epoxy.

You could also go the replacement route:

http://www.amazon.com/Connector-Nint...-pin+connector
 

Fallen Kell

Diamond Member
Oct 9, 1999
6,037
431
126
Sorry to bring this back from the dead, but anyone here order one of these? I know they are pretty darn expensive, but when you start doing the math, they are not too much more expensive than modding a NES with the RGBNES board, replacing the power caps, changing the 1.0 amp power regulator with a 1.5amp one (so it has enough power for the RGBNES board that is now in the system), getting pots, switches, caps, and resistors needed to perform the stereo and famicom audio mods... I mean, you are talking about $200-250 in parts and labor to do those, add in the $50 for a decent NES, $10 for a fixed pin header, and you are looking at $300 or so, and it still won't play famicom games without some funkiness using a converter board (and for the original NES that will not really work without having to take-apart each and every famicom cart and place the board in the converter cart, with some of the later ones not being able to fit due to length, which means you need to go with using something like the old cheat carts which using a much thicker board so they could get contact with the pins without needing to putting the cart in and down, which widens the 72pin connector eventually leading it to push the pins apart farther then they should be and requiring repair to work on normal games)...

So anyway, at least in my mind, I am actually considering it, as there is really only about $100 premium on it when you factor in the capabilities over the price of a modded NES.