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Recommendations for server cpu

kakashisensei

Junior Member
Nov 10, 2007
15
0
66
Hi,

I don't know much about servers and my boss asked me to put together a raid/data server to replace an old server since we have no IT guy. My company is a medical imaging software company. What this server does is for multiple employees to download and upload files ( 0 - 300mb ) from their computers. The server also downloads and uploads files to an offsite server (which is where doctors download and upload files to). It has a custom-developed database program that keeps track of doctor accounts, company users, patient cases, case progress, download/upload status, etc.... and displays it so our technicians can easily work on download a case, work on it, re-upload the finish case.

I dont have any details on what technology the database program uses, but I was told it isnt optimized for more than one processor. My budget is between $1200 to $1600, so that leaves me with about $600 to $1000 for the processor, motherboard, and ram.

I was looking at the xeon 5500s and amd "shanghai", but the motherboards are always dual processor sockets or more. Would getting something like a core i7 single processor platform be just as good for my needs? Thanks.
 

ihyagp

Member
Aug 11, 2008
91
0
0
You want ECC memory support. I don't think the regular i7's have that.

Most dual-socket boards will work just fine with a single CPU in them. I'd go that route if its in your budget.
 

NXIL

Senior member
Apr 14, 2005
774
0
0
Hey K,

first, which OS is server going to be running? Good to know.

Agree w/ above poster that ECC RAM is essential.

Also: are you sure cobbling together a production server is a good idea? I would recommend you buy a server--very competitive market. You may find that you do not save any money building it from parts, and, you won't have on site service, etc, all of which is pretty important when you will have a bunch of really angry doctors on your hands if it goes down.

A pre-built server will have OS and driver support. There is also comfort in having a lot of other people have the exact same system you do--that's a lot of beta testers. If you build your own system, with mobo A and power supply B, etc, you are on your own.

Others here can recommend reliable server brands, but Dell, HP, IBM all immediately come to mind. Service is part of the price. You can do without it, but, say you have two doctors (radiologists?) out of work for a day. Let me tell you, that costs more than a brand new server.

Again, I would not skimp or cut corners on a production, business essential machine that looks like it is going to get used hard. And, like I said, if it goes belly up, do you want a bunch of angry radioactive doctors cursing at you, or Michael Dell?

NXIL
 

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