*Rant* Tax programs trying to squeeze more $ out of you

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Ken g6

Programming Moderator, Elite Member
Moderator
Dec 11, 1999
14,378
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#27
I bought H&R Block Federal and State this year. In the past I've just filed State manually, though their online form. This year I thought I could do it differently...until I found out the state component doesn't come with free state e-file, which costs like $20 more. :mad:

It also kind of looks like my state double-charges me for bond interest, which I wouldn't have discovered without the software. On the other other hand, I think the software included in-state bonds it should have excluded - though they didn't amount to anything significant this year.
 
Jul 20, 2001
54,660
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#28
What is funny about it is they DO do the math, eventually..so why don't they just DO the math and send you the bill? (watched the video after I wrote this)
By having you do the math, any errors are on you. The only thing the IRS really cares about on your return is your signature.
 
Jul 20, 2001
54,660
1,389
126
#29
I bought H&R Block Federal and State this year. In the past I've just filed State manually, though their online form. This year I thought I could do it differently...until I found out the state component doesn't come with free state e-file, which costs like $20 more. :mad:

It also kind of looks like my state double-charges me for bond interest, which I wouldn't have discovered without the software. On the other other hand, I think the software included in-state bonds it should have excluded - though they didn't amount to anything significant this year.
For the federal return, I use the IRS' free fillable forms. For state, I send in paper because my state refuses to go online except through third party software which I ain't buying.
 
Nov 8, 2012
11,665
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#31
I bought H&R Block Federal and State this year. In the past I've just filed State manually, though their online form. This year I thought I could do it differently...until I found out the state component doesn't come with free state e-file, which costs like $20 more. :mad:

It also kind of looks like my state double-charges me for bond interest, which I wouldn't have discovered without the software. On the other other hand, I think the software included in-state bonds it should have excluded - though they didn't amount to anything significant this year.
Turbo Tax does the same thing... Says it comes with State filing... except it's basically bait and switch. You can do the return BUT you can't e-file. That's an additional fee.

I told Turbo tax to go fudge itself. I printed that shit out and mailed it in. I honestly don't succumb to the fee game.
 
Nov 8, 2012
11,665
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#32
By having you do the math, any errors are on you. The only thing the IRS really cares about on your return is your signature.
Wrong.

They care about errors.... When they are in the IRS' favor.

They don't give two shits about errors when they are in their favor.
 

DietDrThunder

Platinum Member
Apr 6, 2001
2,257
87
126
#33
For the federal return, I use the IRS' free fillable forms. For state, I send in paper because my state refuses to go online except through third party software which I ain't buying.
I use the IRS' https://www.freefilefillableforms.com/#/fd as well. You have to read the form instructions from the IRS's website, but it isn't too difficult. You just have to remember to click the "Do the Math" button, and you have to check to ensure numbers get transferred from the various forms, if not, you put them in manually. It only took me two tries to submit this year. I transposed two digits from last year's PIN, then the second time it took. It will send you an email with the error.
 
Jul 20, 2001
54,660
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#35
Scumbags. If the IRS does away with free fillable forms then it is back to paper for me. I ain't paying for the privilege of paying taxes.

Edit: I read the legislation itself. Free fillable forms will remain. It's still sleazy legislation but not as bad as it could be.

SEC. 1102(a)(3) In addition to the services described in paragraph (2), and in the same manner, the IRS Free File Program shall continue to make available to all taxpayers (without regard to income) a basic, online electronic fillable forms utility.
 
Last edited:
Feb 13, 2003
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#36
I've used TaxAct for years and it's usually free for federal and like $25-30 for state (for me anyway, simple 1040 form). But since I had student loan interest, they required me to upgrade to their Deluxe+ or whatever the f it was called and I ended up paying both for federal and state, like almost $90. WTF!? Just for one little student loan interest number?!? F'ing crooks. It must be a new way to rip people off for this year cause it wasn't like that last year. It's tempted me to look elsewhere for taxes next year, including having an actual company/CPA do them.
 
Jul 20, 2001
54,660
1,389
126
#37
I've used TaxAct for years and it's usually free for federal and like $25-30 for state (for me anyway, simple 1040 form). But since I had student loan interest, they required me to upgrade to their Deluxe+ or whatever the f it was called and I ended up paying both for federal and state, like almost $90. WTF!? Just for one little student loan interest number?!? F'ing crooks. It must be a new way to rip people off for this year cause it wasn't like that last year. It's tempted me to look elsewhere for taxes next year, including having an actual company/CPA do them.
If your taxes are simple, look at the IRS' free fillable forms for next year. You can use the forms your software cranked out this year as a guide for next year.
 

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