Rank the available Integrated Graphics solutions

chrislong

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Jan 10, 2001
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Can someone rank the available integrated graphics chipsets for me? After trolling around, I'm having a hard time figuring out what is best at this point in time. The market for these things seems to be quite volatile at the moment. I would probably go with an Intel board, but open to AMD if that's demonstrably better.

No gaming will be required of my choice--it's for my father's upgrade (he's 80). Just trying to figure out the performance hierarchy right now...thanks in advance.

 

MichaelD

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Jan 16, 2001
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For someone who will be doing no gaming at all, and most probably will have a very low resolution (so he can see the screen) it really doesn't matter what IGP you choose. :)

What will your Dad do with this PC? Probably just surf, email and maybe some light photo editing, right? Pick anything, really. Even the most basic PC these days is light years ahead of whatever you're upgrading him from. Get a basic Intel-based board, a C2D CPU, 2GB of RAM, a DVD burner and he'll be set.

Good luck! My Mom is 75 and I've been trying to give her a computer for about 15 years now; she just refuses to learn. :(
 

chrislong

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Jan 10, 2001
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I figure you're right, but I'd still like to get him something near the top of the line, so that it will last as long as possible, performance-wise. So I'm trying to figure out what the "top-of-the-line" is, or what the next best thing might be.
 

daveybrat

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unr3al

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What davey said. The AMD 780G's onboard is simply the best in the business. If there's one thing ATi knows, its making IGP's. The X1250 is the fastest in its class as well.
 

chrislong

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Jan 10, 2001
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Thanks all. Looks like I may be building my first AMD machine.

Planning on slipping this into his current rig--an older intel computer, running XP Home. Any odd issues to think about as I do that?
 

Peter

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Oct 15, 1999
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For that kind of requirements list, I've recently been using the Biostar 740G board (has DVI) plus a dual-core Sempron 2100 and 2x1 GiB of DDR2-800.

The #1 issue with existing cases is power supply connections. Check whether the PSU has SATA power wires, check whether it has 24- or 20-pin main power, and whether it has the extra 4-pin CPU power wire.

The above board and CPU can do with 20-pin main power btw.

The 780G is a massive step up in 3D performance, but also in price. (The 740G is a die shrink of the 690G, apparently).
 

chrislong

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Jan 10, 2001
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We've talked AMD, but if I were to go with an Intel-based mobo, which is the best onboard graphics solution there?

The AMD side is tempting, but it seems like it's a bit more of a gamble for what I'm doing: removing his current Intel board (a Gigabyte model, from around 2002) and replacing it with something new. Going to AMD from Intel seems like it might be a little more trouble than going with an Intel-to-Intel workflow...he's running XP Home...

So--what are the better options in the Intel board world?
 

BLaber

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Jun 23, 2008
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If you are looking for best in integrated graphics , it has to be AMD's new 780GX paired with a cheap x2 dual core processor , look no further , it will be more than enough to keep your father happy.
 

Fox5

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Jan 31, 2005
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Originally posted by: chrislong
We've talked AMD, but if I were to go with an Intel-based mobo, which is the best onboard graphics solution there?

The AMD side is tempting, but it seems like it's a bit more of a gamble for what I'm doing: removing his current Intel board (a Gigabyte model, from around 2002) and replacing it with something new. Going to AMD from Intel seems like it might be a little more trouble than going with an Intel-to-Intel workflow...he's running XP Home...

So--what are the better options in the Intel board world?
Well, honestly upgrading a computer that old is going to have just as much trouble if you go AMD or Intel. (the cpu won't make a different anyway, it'd be the motherboard, and all current motherboards are significantly different from anything in 2002)

Best IGPs for Intel platforms are the geforce 8 series IGPs, or 7 if the 8000s aren't out yet. They're not as good as the AMD IGPs though, especially the newest 790GX.
 

spittledip

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Apr 23, 2005
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If you go intel, make sure you get an Nvidia IGP. But, without a doubt, AMD makes the best IGP.
 

ND40oz

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Jul 31, 2004
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Don't buy an nVidia IGP (7150) based board for the intel side. They may have a graphics lead over the G35, but the chipset is complete crap, it isn't even dual channel capable. Wait for G45 if you want Intel, otherwise G35 is the best chipset available if you need it now, especially if you're not gaming on it at all.
 

chrislong

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Jan 10, 2001
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Wow! Thanks everyone for the answers. Much to think about.

Interesting, Fox5, when you say that upgrading from Intel 2002 to Intel 2008 will cause about as much pain as Intel to AMD. I thought there might be things that were still residually similar in the Intel/Intel transition that might make it a tad less...exciting to do the switch. But if not, that's good. With all these options available to me, I can pick something nice (and cheap!).

Thanks again-great stuff.
 

Mwing

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s44

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Yes -- you actually will notice dual vs single core in regular usage. Slight clock speed differences, not so much.
 

Marty502

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Aug 25, 2007
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Agreed, the dual core benefits are very noticeable in even the simplest tasks. Get him an cheap AMD/Intel dual core, 2 GB of RAM and whatever video card the mobo has integrated and he'll be more than fine. :)
 

Fox5

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Jan 31, 2005
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Originally posted by: chrislong
Wow! Thanks everyone for the answers. Much to think about.

Interesting, Fox5, when you say that upgrading from Intel 2002 to Intel 2008 will cause about as much pain as Intel to AMD. I thought there might be things that were still residually similar in the Intel/Intel transition that might make it a tad less...exciting to do the switch. But if not, that's good. With all these options available to me, I can pick something nice (and cheap!).

Thanks again-great stuff.
Nope, since 2002 Intel has changed memory standards, case design, processor architecture, and several completely different motherboard chipsets. Whether you go AMD or Intel, you're going to have to replace motherboard + cpu + memory + possibly case and power supply and maybe even harddrive (new motherboards only have 1 IDE port) and either one is likely to give Windows the same amount of troubles.
 

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