Question Randomly losing intnet connection

Ketchup

Elite Member
Sep 1, 2002
14,517
223
106
I have an Arris modem provided by the internet provider. It is connection to a TP-Link Archer Wireless router. I work from home, so one wired port is pretty much on VPN all day. About once a week (sometimes more, sometimes less) the Internet connect will drop for between 1 and 2 minutes. When I say the Internet connection drops, I mean the connection Internet connection light on the router turns red, and nothing in the house can connect to the internet. When I look at the modem, all three lights are on (normal). When I call the ISP, their automated system runs some sort of check and reports all is good on their end. The network itself is just fine, as I continue to be able to access files on other PCs in the house. I have replaced the cable that runs from the modem to the router, but that doesn't seem to make a difference.

Any idea what might be causing this?
 

VirtualLarry

No Lifer
Aug 25, 2001
53,772
8,014
126
From your description, it sounds like the router is dropping the WAN connection.

Check the router's logs, to see if DHCP for the WAN is renewing properly. Also, are you using IPv4 or IPv6 for the VPN connection?
 

Ketchup

Elite Member
Sep 1, 2002
14,517
223
106
Thanks for the reply VL. The router makes as much sense as anything, as it is the only thing that has changed on my side (had it a little over 2 years). The logs don't show much, only thing interesting is two 20-minute gaps at the time frame of the issue (which on it's own is weird). VPN is IPv4.
 

Ketchup

Elite Member
Sep 1, 2002
14,517
223
106
Edit... I take that back. just noticed that my router can't adjust for DLT. So it appears the logs only go back to when the connection we re-established. I haven't looked at these before, so I don't know if there is a standard cutoff on these, of if that is/was part of the issue.
 

Tech Junky

Golden Member
Jan 27, 2022
1,088
343
96
all three lights are on (normal)
Sounds ok

light on the router turns red
Sounds like a glitch / router reboot needed or a flakey cable between the two. Check the Ethernet cable to make sure it's seated on both ends / swap to test. If the cable doesn't fix it then you could try another firmware on the router to see if it's a bug that auto downloaded in the middle of the night or something along those lines.

DST adjustment isn't a big deal for the router it just indicated the NTP server isn't configured to a reachable IP/DNS name. This is more important for client devices trying to use SSL / HTTPS because time checks come into play.
 

Fallen Kell

Diamond Member
Oct 9, 1999
5,789
311
126
I would start with replacing the cable between the router and the cable modem. You would be surprised how many times it comes down to a flaky ethernet cable. It is also a very cheap thing to try and do. At this point, I would get a CAT6A cable which you should be able to find for around $10 now (for most lengths that people would need between a router and the cable modem).
 

Ketchup

Elite Member
Sep 1, 2002
14,517
223
106
As mention in the opening post, that cable has been replaced. It was a brand new cable ( never used). I am sure it was only a CAT 5, as it came with a previous router.

I haven't looked for a router update in about a year, so that is next on my list.
 

Ketchup

Elite Member
Sep 1, 2002
14,517
223
106
After replacing the router (my expense) and the modem (their expense) my ISP sent someone out and found damage on the line (we belive it was caused by a recent power outage). They have made repairs and all is back to normal.
 

Tech Junky

Golden Member
Jan 27, 2022
1,088
343
96
ahh... the drop was damaged. Glad they found it and replaced it. Now, to keep the new router or return it is the question.
 

Ketchup

Elite Member
Sep 1, 2002
14,517
223
106
Yes. Well the new router, TP-Link AX3000 seems to have a bit better signal strength in the back of the house, so probably will end up keeping it. I have found that routers over the last decade don't last as long as the old ones I used to buy, so the worst thing would be to return a router, just to have the old one crap out on me.
 

Tech Junky

Golden Member
Jan 27, 2022
1,088
343
96
/shrug/ Things are more disposable today than they used to be for sure. Convenience now or wait for the OG to die.. .if you can hook up an Ethernet cable when it dies it's just inconvenient.

I run an AP now but, in a pinch could configure an AX210 adapter and turn it into a WIFI hotspot while figuring out the next AP to get. Ethernet always works too. Phone can also be switched to a hotspot as well. Neighbors have the same Cable connection and the CPE broadcasts an SSID hotspot as well.

Comes down to whether or not it's vital and if you have other options that are convenient. Personally I'd rather have the cash in my pocket than a TPL blinking at me. Though it is providing you with slightly better coverage in remote areas of the house. Could be a placebo effect though too.
 

ASK THE COMMUNITY