Question on Guns

Mister T

Diamond Member
Feb 25, 2000
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#1
I am a newbie when it comes to guns. All I know is what I see in the movies or on TV.

I have shot a 22 pistol, bb guns and pellet guns.
Thats about it.

Latey, I have been thinking about getting a handgun, a shotgun and a rifle. I want to get into Hunting and Gaming. What do you guys recommend?

I would looking as some shotguns this week and was wondering why would anyone buy a pump action shotgun when you could buy a semi-automatic.

I have tons of questions, but it basically all sums up to what should I get? Anything I should be aware of when I go and actually buy a gun?
 

PCAddict

Diamond Member
Nov 19, 1999
3,804
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#2
Well, it depends on what type of hunting you plan on doing. Personal preference of course plays a large part as well. My advice is to find a reputable dealer that has a range at their facility where you can try out various weapons before you make a purchase. There are two in my area (both are excellent).

You may find out that you need more than one type of each gun. Oh darn. ;) I've found that owning one rifle, shotgun, or handgun doesn't cut it.
 

Tominator

Diamond Member
Oct 9, 1999
9,559
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#3
Tough call on a Forum!

I'd contact a Gun Dealer who preferably has an indoor shooting range. Or possibly a Gun Club. They will be in your local Yellow Pages.

Get Guns and Ammo, Shooting Times[magazines] and join the National Rifle Association. Your membership includes a subscription to one of three magazines, your choice, that includes a lot of good information on different firearms.

I would pick one at a time. Handgun, shotgun, etc. Learn about one before moving on to the next. Just like computers, knowledge is king.

On the subject of Pump v. Auto. A pump isn't particular about the shells put through it, where most autos will not work with all that is available. A pump is more reliable for this reason. A pump doesn't have the complexity of an auto and is easier to maintain. You will spend qutie a bit of time cleaning any firearm, btw.

A good shotgun,be it pump or auto is a joy to shoot if it 'fits' you. This can only be done in person with a very competent salesman. To hit a target with regularity a shotgun or any gun for that matter, needs to 'fit' you. The distance between your shoulder and elbow to your palm, all can make the difference between being an 'OK' shot and having the ability to become a 'good' shot. This might seem minor, but can be the difference from really enjoying the sport or just being a participant.

That applies to all guns.

Don't let anyone rush you in to anything. Take your time. Learn!

 

MooseKnuckle

Golden Member
Oct 24, 1999
1,392
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#4
Mister T,
Read my post, don't buy a Beretta in the .32ACP variety. A handgun I would recommend is a Sig 9mm or a Beretta in a larger caliber. Stay away from "mouseguns"...lol.
 
Dec 12, 1999
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#5
Tominator, don't forget the part of a hunter/safety course... some states require it to possess a hunting permit, mine does.Regardless of whether you are going to hunt or not, if you are contemplating the purchase of a firearm, and unless you are very familiar w/safe handling rules for firearms, then it is highly recommended to take a safety course and practice at a supervised range ( for newbies)


BTW forget everything you have seen about guns on TV...you might be grateful later:D
 
Oct 9, 1999
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#6
Regardless of what weapons you choose, there are three things you need to do before you EVER use it outside of the shooting range:

1. Practice
2. Practice
3. Practice

Oh, and a fourth I forgot:

4. Practice

Russ, NCNE
 

Tominator

Diamond Member
Oct 9, 1999
9,559
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#7
kamiam Damn right! Sorry, I got a couple of phone calls and completely forgot....and Russ, you forgot #5...more practice...:D
 
Oct 9, 1999
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#8
Oh, and recommendations:

Pistol: Beretta 92FS
Shotgun: Mossberg 500

Rifle: I'm not a hunter, so I wouldn't know where to point you. I do like my Savage Tactical Model 110FP, heavy barrel .223 with 8-24 range finding, trajectory compensating scope, though.:D Three inch 4 shot groups at 200 yards.

Russ, NCNE
 

cyderpunk

Junior Member
Jul 20, 2000
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#9
How about an MP5SD, automatic 9mm (800 rounds per minute) with built in silencer, restricted to government use, but worth getting...
Miniguns are also good for "home defence" :p
Apologies... being a Brit I cannot buy anything more powerful than a .22 air pistol :Q
 

Tominator

Diamond Member
Oct 9, 1999
9,559
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#10
cyderpunk
Let's not go there....

Great rifle Russ! Those Savage Rifles are affordable and haven't ever been given their due.

Baretta. Speaks for itself! I'd have one if it came in .45...Just make sure your hands are large enough for it. Small handed folks have a devil of a time getting real accuracy with any large framed gun.

Mossberg 500. Another gun never given it's due. Cheap, or should I say inexpensive, reliable and enough aftermarket parts to disguise it completely!:D

Oh, and the MP5SD doesn't have a 'built-in silencer.' Believe it or not, it is a press fit! Friction is the only thing that holds it on. The really neat thing about it is that unlike any other silencer, it reduces the velocity to under the speed of sound no matter what ammo is used! To keep most 'silencers' working, it needs to be taken apart and cleaned...the MP5SD is just washed out with a solvent...good as new.

As for mini-guns...all we can do is dream....:)
 

Lalakai

Golden Member
Nov 30, 1999
1,634
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#11
Mister T, get with a friend or family member who has some firearms and do some actual shooting to see what you prefer.

Rather then look at a specific type of firearm (auto vs pump vs double), go with what feels comfortable.

For shotguns, consider your primary use. If you're into rabbit/pheasant/squirrel/partridge hunting, a 20 gauge or 12 gauge will work just fine, nor should you need a 3 1/2".

If you're primarily interested in waterfowl, turkey, or hunt in states that only allow steel shot, then a 12 gauge 3 1/2" has some merit; but be prepared for a significant recoil.

Rifles are just as flexible depending on your main usage. Most hunting in North America can be satisfied with 270 and up. The 300 Win Mag tends to be over-kill on white tail, but a good cartidge for elk, moose, mule deer, black bear or brown bear. The 7mm Mag is good for extended ranges but you trade it for a lighter projectile along with keeping a very solid recoil.

I hunt with double barrel shotguns or a pump. My main deer rifle is a lever action 30-30 (good for the brush and short distances). Pistol hunting for deer is done with a 10mm revolver or a 50 AE, but the distances I allow for pistol hunting never exceeds 30 yards.

Don't feel that you have to spend major bucks to get solid dependable firearms. Used guns should also be considered. Get to a good gun shop and talk with someone who'll take the time and match up the firearms that best suit your build and major goals.

if you want, drop me a message and I'll answer some more questions. A part time job for me is behind the counter at a gun store and there are many people in your same situation with the same questions, so don't hesitate. good luck
 
Nov 30, 1999
2,091
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#12


<< Rifle: I'm not a hunter, so I wouldn't know where to point you. >>



LOL Russ :D I wonder if that was intended or not..or maybe im just really slow...
 

Tominator

Diamond Member
Oct 9, 1999
9,559
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#13
Lalakai More good advise!
Now I'm envious of you. I miss the 'shop.'
 

Prong

Senior member
Jul 11, 2000
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#14
Mr. T,
A lot of good advice has been given out so far. Once you find a reputable shop, I would recommend buying a .22 rifle to start out with. You can get a new or a decent used one for ~$125. Ammunition is cheap (~$10 for 500 rounds). The noise and recoil are non-existant, and you can afford to practice and learn the basics on the cheap. It's also a way to meet people at the local range that have a variety of guns that you might be able to try out. I've found that many people at a range will go out of their way to help a newbie to the sport. Once you get a handle on what you like as well as your recoil tolerance level, you can make an informed decision when it comes time to buy.
 

Tiger

Platinum Member
Oct 9, 1999
2,312
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#15
Great advice so far.

I would add:

If you're going to be doing any shotgunning, be it waterfowling or upland birding get used to using steel shot loads. I was one of the unfortunates who learned to shoot with lead shot and had to switch over to steel. It was a couple of days before I could hit the broad side of a barn. I'm not sure how many states still allow lead shot but the number is getting smaller and smaller every day.

If you do buy a gun at a discount store get yourself to a gun shop and have the thing fitted properly. I've done that with all my shotguns and it makes a big difference.

 

Feisters

Senior member
Oct 9, 1999
577
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#16
Mr. T,

Unless you learned how to shoot &quot;on the farm&quot; at an early age, the very first thing I recommend is please take a NRA certified firearms course regardless of your local statutes. You'll be taught all the basics on firearm handling and safety. This will give you the foundation to become a responsible and safe shooter, and give you confidence. It will also allow you to be a more informed buyer. Good luck and thank you for exercising your 2nd Amendment right!
 

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