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Poll: How long until 100mbps is widely available in America

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dawp

Lifer
Jul 2, 2005
10,731
1,956
126
Originally posted by: BigJ
Originally posted by: MegaVovaN
Originally posted by: PingSpike
I'm just going to have to extrapolate based on current ISP trends in the United States.

It should be available for all in the next 10 years. There will be a monthly bandwidth cap of 2GB, however. The ultra-speed package will feature a whopping 1Gb/s speed with a monthly bandwidth cap of 3GB. It will cost an additional 2000 Ameros. And it will have upload speeds of 1200 baud.
Sure sounds like it. Please educate the noob (me) how much a 1200 baud is in kb/s?
Pretty much a max of a little under 4kb/s.
here's a pretty good explaination of what baud is

 

ScottMac

Moderator<br>Networking<br>Elite member
Mar 19, 2001
5,471
2
0
Originally posted by: dawp
Originally posted by: BigJ
Originally posted by: MegaVovaN
Originally posted by: PingSpike
I'm just going to have to extrapolate based on current ISP trends in the United States.

It should be available for all in the next 10 years. There will be a monthly bandwidth cap of 2GB, however. The ultra-speed package will feature a whopping 1Gb/s speed with a monthly bandwidth cap of 3GB. It will cost an additional 2000 Ameros. And it will have upload speeds of 1200 baud.
Sure sounds like it. Please educate the noob (me) how much a 1200 baud is in kb/s?
Pretty much a max of a little under 4kb/s.
here's a pretty good explaination of what baud is
A BAUD pretty much equates to one clock cycle, usually given as "per second". Modems used to do one bit per BAUD so that a 300 BAUD modem would directly equate to 300 BITS PER SECOND. Newer technology puts multiple bits per BAUD so that something like a 56K modem is actually operating at 14,400 BAUD, transmitting 4 bits-per-BAUD (total 57,600 bits per second, considered 56 KiloBAUD).

The next wrinkle in the equation is "How many bits to create a single character?"

Most async modems standardized on 8 data bit, no parity, one stop bits (plus there's a start bit) for a total of 10 bits per character of raw data.
(so now you have a 20% overhead per data byte)

SO, theoretically you could get roughly 5,600 characters per second.

Unfortunately, you have to also deduct the IP header information of the packet, possibly the TCP or UDP header info, and the header information of the frame carrying the packet.

Since the data payload varies per packet, overhead can be anywhere from (rough numbers) another 20% to a little under 2%.

So, a 1200 Baud modem is usually 1200 bits per second or 1.2kbps, since a KiloBAUD is 1000 BAUD not 1024 BAUD.

100 Meg to the Internet is available now, and has been available for years. I have one at work, and another one on the way ... both by way of a fractional Gig (GigaMAN) link. IF you don't mind sharing a little bandwidth space, there's also a product in call OptiMAN, which I believe is even less expensive.

I can't really say that either are all that expensive, compared to what people used to pay for a DS3 line (45Mbps) and the associated equipment.

The other point most "I want more bandwidth" crowd are missing is that you will get the bandwidth of the smallest segment that the data passes through. Meaning that if the data passes through a T1 link somewhere, the best you're gonna get is T1 speed through the entire path ... regardless of your local link speed.

If the place you are connecting to only has a T1/DS1, that's how fast you're gonna get your info. Even if they had an OC3 (155Mbps), chances are that's is throttled per flow down to a much slower speed (per connection) so that one really fast connection doesn't occupy the entire chunk of bandwidth (too easy to DOS attack).

AND ... speaking of attacks, even if some site has something like a DS3 feeding it, if they have protective equipment, like IDS and firewalls, and they're not implemented properly (or they're cheap), you will not see DS3 (45Mbps) speeds from that site ... the processing delays of the protective equipment (especially the IDS) will slow it down considerably.

Most providers could easily give you serious bandwidth between your place and theirs, but without infrastructure behind it to move the data around, you'd be paying for bandwidth you have no possible way of filling - ike putting a 4" fire hose to your connection, but the other end is fed by a garden hose ... all you get is a garden hose worth of flow. Actually, it'd be more like putting 192 four-inch fire hoses connecting to a single 6" hose (it is, ultimately, shared bandwidth).

You won't see functional ("real") 100Mbps to-the-home bandwidth for "quite a while." You might get a connection that fast, but there'll be nothing behind it beyond the provider's own service network.

Good Luck

Scott

 

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