Poll: Do you trust Blair?

Lonyo

Lifer
Aug 10, 2002
21,939
6
81
In the UK, the oppositions main push is "You can't trust a word he says" about PM Tony Blair. Do you agree or disagree?
They also commented a poll said 2/3 of the British public didn't trust him.
 

ClueLis

Platinum Member
Jul 2, 2003
2,269
0
0
I trust Blair to follow the lead of whoever is the American President at the time. That's what he's done with both Clinton and Bush.
 

BaliBabyDoc

Lifer
Jan 20, 2001
10,737
0
0
He had no choice with Clinton b/c he recognized the skills of a master BSer. I bet Blair thought he could manage Bush. Unfortunately, Blair didn't factor in the lack intellectual curiosity factor or lack of insight possessed by his Atlantic counterpart. Blair needs to stick to his guns on the need for Iraqi liberation from Saddam's regime while acknowledging the WMD story is poo. People can handle lies from their politicians . . . hell they all but expect it. It's the refusal to acknowledge "mistakes" or "lies" that gets people into trouble.

Bill Clinton should have said, "yeah I considered taxing that arse . . . I mean come on . . . look at how big that is. I bet even the brothers in the room might hit that from the rear. But I couldn't do that b/c I'm a good married Christian man so I honored her request to provide fellatio. I'm a public servant you know . . . and I would hate for a citizen request to go unanswered."
 

CaptnKirk

Lifer
Jul 25, 2002
10,053
0
71
Sadly enough, not anymore.
Bush did Tony's credibility in by association with Bush's Cabal.
 

phillyTIM

Golden Member
Jan 12, 2001
1,942
10
81
i dont trust blair now because he allowed himself to succumb to bush's strongarm

and because all this wmd talk has turned into no tangible results

what a joke
 

drewshin

Golden Member
Dec 14, 1999
1,464
0
0
i dont trust everything he says, but i feel that he does have guts to face parliament and answer questions. rather than a coward like bush, whose whole administration has been one of hiding, deflecting, and cowardice.
 

BOBDN

Banned
May 21, 2002
2,579
0
0
I don't trust Blair or Bush.

Nice to see Blair and Tenet falling on the sword for Bush though.

I wonder how deep that sword will have to cut before they turn on Bush.

This is going to be as much fun to watch as Watergate, maybe more. :D
 

LunarRay

Diamond Member
Mar 2, 2003
9,993
1
76
I voted elsewhere and no... but, not because he is a liar and in league with the other garden invaders... nope... I don't trust Blair because he is an Englishman Prime Minister... I never trust them...
 

BOBDN

Banned
May 21, 2002
2,579
0
0
Blair is having a rough go of it at home thanks to Bush and Co.

From the NY Times

Dispute on Iraq Weapons Clouds Blair's Trip to U.S.
By WARREN HOGE and DON VAN NATTA Jr.


LONDON, July 16 ? Prime Minister Tony Blair travels to Washington on Thursday on a mission to underline Britain's close and dependable relationship with the United States without reinforcing his domestic critics' portrayal of him as an unquestioning follower of President Bush.

His visit to Washington, the first stop in a weeklong trip that is to take him to Japan, South Korea and China, comes at a time when he and the Mr. Bush are battling accusations that they misrepresented the threat posed by Saddam Hussein and exaggerated intelligence findings to bolster their case for a military strike on Iraq.

The two leaders will be holding their talks against a backdrop of claims and counterclaims about the justification for going to war and a continuing failure to find the weapons of mass destruction that both men said were a menace requiring immediate action.

British public opinion, which swung behind the war effort once British troops entered Iraq in March, has now turned back into opposition, and the leadership of President Bush enjoys scant support among Britons.

In a rowdy House of Commons session today, the Conservative leader, Iain Duncan Smith, told Mr. Blair, "You are rapidly becoming a stranger to the truth,", as lawmakers bellowed disapproval of the prime minister, waved their papers in the air and accused him of having "duped" them into going to war.

"You have created a culture of deceit and spin at the heart of government," Mr. Duncan Smith said, exploiting the government's most vulnerable aspect as portrayed in new opinion polls showing public trust in Mr. Blair at its lowest point in his six years in power.


Mr. Blair told the House that he stood entirely behind the intelligence information that his government had put forward in two disputed dossiers during the past year, and he turned aside repeated calls for an independent judicial inquiry into the government's case for war. Two committees of Parliament are currently holding hearings on the subject.

In a speech he is to deliver before a joint session of Congress on Thursday, Mr. Blair will appeal for continued American efforts to engage Europe and the United Nations as broadly as possible in the reconstruction of Iraq, despite past disagreements over the war.

According to a senior British official familiar with Mr. Blair's message, the prime minister plans to assert that the best path for Britain and the United States is "spreading our shared values ? not just American values, or British values, but universal values ? throughout the world."

Mr. Blair rejects the notion that the Bush administration's assertive policy in the Persian Gulf is unilateralist, and to make that point anew, he may speak of the shared responsibilities of the United States, Britain and their allies as "muscular multilateralism," the official said.

Mr. Blair is expected to argue that it was those shared, universal values that justified the invasion of Iraq and the removal from power of Saddam Hussein, as well as the 2001 invasion of Afghanistan that removed the Taliban from power there.

"There is this myth that these countries don't want freedom, and that Saddam or the Taliban are popular, but then it becomes apparent that they were not at all popular after they fall," the official said.

Mr. Blair will probably not address the controversy over the intelligence about Iraq's weapons programs in his prepared remarks, though he expects to be asked about it in a joint news conference with Mr. Bush, the official said.

"There has been a lot of discussion over the past few days about this," the official said. "He expects to be absolutely in lock-step with the president when it comes up at the press conference," the official said, adding that Mr. Blair was "keen on putting the whole thing behind him."

While Mr. Blair has been credited with helping persuade the Bush administration last fall to seek United Nations backing for its Iraq policy and with generally shoring up less hawkish elements of the Bush administration, he is faulted by his critics here for having little influence in Washington and providing international cover for an American administration bent on unilateralist interventions around the world.

Mr. Blair has been repeatedly lampooned in the British press as Mr. Bush's "poodle." Simon Jenkins, a Times of London columnist, wrote today that Mr. Blair had shortchanged Britain's special relationship with the United States, making "a marriage of platonic dignity into one of puppy love."

This week, Mr. Blair has had to confront controversy over the validity of intelligence on Iraq's bid to seek uranium for a possible nuclear weapons program from Niger, a claim that President Bush used in his State of the Union address but that his administration has now distanced itself from.

Britain has asserted that its information was correct, since it was based on intelligence independent from the reports that the United States relied upon and now disavows.

The official added that Mr. Blair was perplexed at the ongoing dispute, believing that it was "no surprise" that Iraq was trying to revitalize its nuclear weapons program.

"It's no secret that Saddam was trying to get uranium from somewhere, and he had succeeded to get uranium all through the 1980's," the official said. "It is not something that we just made up to pad an otherwise thin dossier, as has been suggested again and again."

Although there have been suggestions in Washington that Mr. Blair's government developed the intelligence about Iraq seeking to obtain uranium from Niger, the British official said that Mr. Blair would "stand firm" with Mr. Bush and would not try to pass off any blame.

"Both governments talked extensively about this intelligence last fall," the official said. Asked if British officials would try to blame the Washington in any way, the official said: "We're not going to do that. We're friends; friends stand together."
 

Lonyo

Lifer
Aug 10, 2002
21,939
6
81
British public opinion, which swung behind the war effort once British troops entered Iraq in March, has now turned back into opposition, and the leadership of President Bush enjoys scant support among Britons.
If your troops go to war, even a war you don't agree with, you'd most probably be behind those troops, even if not the war. Many people are confusing this point, the war and the troops who went to war are 2 different things and you can support the troops without supporting the war.
Having at go at Blair for taking us to war has nothing to do with opportunism, as many people supported the troops not the war, and Blair is trying to make out that people supported the war.
He dug himself a big hole and he's not building a ladder very quickly.
 

Nitemare

Lifer
Feb 8, 2001
35,466
1
76
Yeah, he's a friggin moron. The dumbass relied on his own nations intelligence and assumed it was accurate. What a retard
 

LilBlinbBlahIce

Golden Member
Dec 31, 2001
1,837
0
0
No, but what would you expect from Bush's b!tch? As someone mentioned, at least he had the cahones to face parliment, unlike a certain somebody who proved what a pussy he really is by letting the head of the CIA "take the bullet" for him.
 

Drift3r

Guest
Jun 3, 2003
3,572
0
0
Originally posted by: drewshin
i dont trust everything he says, but i feel that he does have guts to face parliament and answer questions. rather than a coward like bush, whose whole administration has been one of hiding, deflecting, and cowardice.
Actually I saw recent session of parliament and I must say it was a fresh of breath air. Imagine Bush Jr. having to face and answer tough questions from members of Congress without the aid of his speech writers. They certianly do not hand hold in the British parliament thats for sure.

 

Fencer128

Platinum Member
Jun 18, 2001
2,700
1
91
You need to add another option:

"You trust that he knows what he's saying is true to what he believes - most of the time (at least as much as any other politician)"

I honestly believe that he believes he's doing the right thing most of the time - the trouble is that sometimes he can be self-deluding.

Cheers,

Andy
 

phillyTIM

Golden Member
Jan 12, 2001
1,942
10
81
Blair has allowed Bush to turn him into a JOKE. And I hear Bush is suppose to award Blair a Congressional Medal of Honor, for helping the US out with Iraq.

I can't wait till George slaps that Medal on his Bvtch(blair), then the jokes will really start flying. Least of which, Blair being Bush's "Yes Man". heh heh heh
 

Fencer128

Platinum Member
Jun 18, 2001
2,700
1
91
Originally posted by: phillyTIM
Blair has allowed Bush to turn him into a JOKE. And I hear Bush is suppose to award Blair a Congressional Medal of Honor, for helping the US out with Iraq.

I can't wait till George slaps that Medal on his Bvtch(blair), then the jokes will really start flying. Least of which, Blair being Bush's "Yes Man". heh heh heh
I live in the UK and no little about US accolades - but I would think that the CMoH is for outstanding bravery above and beyond the call of duty. It's hardly likely to be given to a non-serving civilian?

Cheers,

Andy
 

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