Pixel mapping on retina displays

May 13, 2013
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#1
Does the method of displaying 1 pixel as 4 impact image quality? Wouldn't 4 dots with spaces in the middle look different than one dot?
 
Oct 2, 2010
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#2
That depends on the viewing distance and pixel density of the display.

In terms of math, yes, 1:1 pixel mapping is going to look better than 1:4 pixel mapping.
 
May 13, 2013
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#3
In terms of math, yes, 1:1 pixel mapping is going to look better than 1:4 pixel mapping.
I see. Doesn't seem to be a good choice at all from the consumer standpoint for them to go retina then.
 

TheStu

Moderator<br>Mobile Devices & Gadgets
Moderator
Sep 15, 2004
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#4
In reality, given your viewing distance and the size of the pixels in question, you basically cannot see the lines between them on a retina display. And having 4 pixels (or 9 in the case of 3x retina on the iPhones X and XS), allows for more fine details to come through, and that text comes across more clearly.

The advantage for the consumer, especially on the Mac, is that the system can display non-optimal resolutions more clearly. Yes, they're still some blurring, but it's not nearly as bad as it has been in the past. And if nothing else, you can use 3rd party software to run the panels at their full resolution.
 

Plar

Junior Member
Aug 6, 2018
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#5
4K (resolution) is a concept that emerged in the era of digital cinema. In film, the screen resolution is measured by the length of the frame, horizontally, and not vertically, as in television. Since in digital cinema there are different standards for the aspect ratio of the screen, it is more convenient to focus on the horizontal resolution, which remains constant, unlike the height of the frame. But technologies are rapidly developing, and now the video of this quality can be broadcast continuously.
 

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