Question Phanteks XT Pro Ultra computer chassis - thoughts on the build

akugami

Diamond Member
Feb 14, 2005
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Hello everyone, just some random thoughts as I embark on a new computer build.

Today, I'll be posting some thoughts on my build with the new Phanteks XT Pro Ultra. Got it for $80 USD + tax. And after working in it, it's fantastic value for the money, considering the room you have to work with, and the fact that it comes with four case fans. I'm also using the new Thermalright Phantom Spirit 120 EVO cooler.

This build is mainly for the kids, so they can each have their own little mini-gaming system. In a post a few years back, I posted my thoughts on, what was then, a relatively new case in the Phanteks P600S, which I'm still using. Having been happy with my other Phanteks, I gave the new Phanteks XT Pro Ultra a shot.

This will be a standard Intel build, nothing fancy. Video cards are super expensive right now and I'm trying to scour the usual sources for some economically priced video cards. The kids are still mostly playing Roblox, so it's fine as-is for now. But the system will be powerful enough to just pop in a video card and they'd have fantastic gaming systems for years to come.

Phanteks XT Pro Ultra chassis
Seasonic Prime Gold 850W modular PSU
ASUS TUF GAMING Z690-PLUS WIFI D4
Intel I7-12700K
Thermalright Phantom Spirit 120 EVO
32GB DDR4 RAM
M2 SSD
Video Card - TBD

Too lazy, and time consuming, to post actual pictures of my own build, but you can view the pictures in the manufacturer's website in the link above. I was also supervising the kids so they were doing part of the work of building their own systems themselves.

The XT Pro Ultra I got is the white colored one, and it is relatively light compared to my trusty Phanteks P600S. The sides definitely have more flex to it. But at $80, it's kind of understandable.

The XT Pro Ultra has a windowed side panel. It was very easy to remove both side panels to access the chassis.

One absolute must, at least for me, in any new computer case is that it needs USB-C. This one does have a USB-A and USB-C connector at the top front.

Checking out the room inside that you have to work with, I'm going to have to say this is a fantastic value. Lots of cutouts in the proper places to make cable management easy, and lots of room for larger video cards or air cpu coolers. Based off the specs, it has enough room for a Noctua NH-D15, which I used in my last build. In this one, I opted to use a more economical solution i the Thermalright Phantom Spirit 120 EVO. I'm going to have to say, the Thermalright cooler was very easy to put on.

While I opted for a traditional air cooler, you can put in a closed loop water cooler at the top of the case. There's a removable magnetic dust shroud that sits at the top. I would have liked to be able to have a solid cover on the top, for those not using an AIO water cooler.

You can mount a couple of 2.5" HDD's or SSD's to the back side case, though I'm going to use M.2 SSD's. It's also got a removable HDD cage at the bottom of the case that will take two 3.5" HDD's, should you need them. So it's got the ability to meet the storage needs of 99% of the people looking to build a computer in this type of chassis. Anyone who needs more can get an external HDD or NAS. The HDD cage is secured by a single thumb screw, and can be easily taken out for easier HDD installation.

One thing I was not used to is all the LED fan connectors. With a CPU cooler that has LED lights, and the four included case-fans that have LED lights, that's a few more cables that I need to plug into the mobo. In all honesty, I have never plugged one of those in prior to this current build. All of my previous builds have been more utilitarian. Kids like the LED lighting though. The RAM has LED lights too. I've been told each LED light adds 5 fps to your games.

The build is not finished, as I have other tasks to take care of. Still need to plug in the PSU, M.2 SSD, and power on everything and test it, but so far, it's been a relatively easy build. Cable management has been easy, and it's got plenty of room for all major components.

Having gotten this far in it, I feel that for $80, it looks like it's got all the features you are looking for in a computer chassis and is a fantastic value. Sure, we know that $150-200 chassis may have more heft, and is more solid. But how many of us are transporting our computers around every day? I haven't moved my main rig, except to dust underneath and around it, in the last three years.
 
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Dec 10, 2005
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You might be able to find some cheap RX 6600 GPUs for your purposes if they only play at 1080.

I can definitely appreciate the space you can get in an ATX build. Prior to my current build (which is in a 4000D), I had an mITX cube and my wife's rig is an mITX cube. They're nice because they are kind of compact, but they are kind of a general pain in the ass to assemble and cable manage. And then if you want to do a "simple" upgrade, it can become a big to-do of taking it all apart.
 

akugami

Diamond Member
Feb 14, 2005
5,656
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@Brainonska511

It's three systems, one for each kid, so it's a huge money pit for video cards. My daughter isn't as hardcore into gaming. But the two boys are starting to graduate to things like Fortnite, among other games. So ideally, I'd get them something that can play games decently well, and last them a few years. They don't need a video card that can play games at ultra settings with all bells and whistles on though.

I've worked in some mITX cases. They look fantastic when fully built, but it's a huge pain in the backside building them, and a nightmare if you have to swap out a component.
 
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