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Question Pc keeps crashing

ChillCosby

Junior Member
Sep 13, 2020
3
0
6
Hi, for some reason my pc has been crashing lately. It doesn't seem like it happens when doing a specific action like gaming, so im very confused. It could be all sorts of issues, and ive tried a lot of different things already. To explain the issue in more detail, i turn on my pc, and play or do other stuff for about half an hour to an hour, before my pc (without warning) suddenly crashes. When this happens i dont get a BSOD, and it also happens so fast that i haven't been able to get a minidump. My pc normally only crashes once, and then i can play or do other stuff (sometimes it even doesn't crash at all). I have tried running the memtest86, but it found no errors, so i assume my memory is ok. I have also tried running programs like ccleaner. I also updated my bios, but that did nothing. If anyone has any ideas on why this might happen, please let me know.

My pc specs:
Windows 10 home version 2004

CPU: Intel Xeon X5670 2.93GHz

Motherboard: Gigabyte X58A-UD3R

GPU: NVIDIA GeForce GTX 970 4gb

RAM: 16 gb Gskill ripjaws ddr3 1600 mhz

PSU: Cooler Master | Masterwatt 600 lite 80plus white

250GB Samsung SSD

2 tb Seagate HDD
 

Steltek

Platinum Member
Mar 29, 2001
2,522
352
126
"Crash" can mean a lot of things, and you aren't being clear here.

Is the machine just turning off (or turning off and restarting), or is it just throwing an error and continuing to work but poorly? If it is just shutting off, that is usually indicative of a hardware failure (i.e. a failing PSU, an overheating CPU, etc). If it is just throwing errors, you need to look at other things.

First, check the Windows reliability history to see if there are any specific issues happening around the time of the crashes. If the machine is shutting off, the reliability history will flag these events as improper shutdowns. Make a note of the times of the shutdowns, then check the Windows system event log for around that time to see if there are any warnings or errors preceding the shutdown.

What model of Samsung SSD do you have? Have you run any testing on the SSD using the manufacturer software to check its status?

If you haven't done so, install software to check your CPU and GPU temps to see if they are overheating.

It also wouldn't hurt to run SFC /scannow from an elevated command prompt to check for system file corruption. Similarly, run CHKDSK on your boot drive in read only mode (i.e. with no switches like /f or /r) to check for file system corruption. If CHKDSK finds file system corruption when run in read only mode, it will terminate the scan giving you the opportunity to back up important files before running CHKDSK /f to fix the file system.

Finally, did it do this before you upgraded to Win10 v2004? That has been a problematic upgrade for some folks.
 

ChillCosby

Junior Member
Sep 13, 2020
3
0
6
Thank you for the reply!
The machine is simply just shutting off, and then restarting (I think this happens because of the
"Crash" can mean a lot of things, and you aren't being clear here.

Is the machine just turning off (or turning off and restarting), or is it just throwing an error and continuing to work but poorly? If it is just shutting off, that is usually indicative of a hardware failure (i.e. a failing PSU, an overheating CPU, etc). If it is just throwing errors, you need to look at other things.

First, check the Windows reliability history to see if there are any specific issues happening around the time of the crashes. If the machine is shutting off, the reliability history will flag these events as improper shutdowns. Make a note of the times of the shutdowns, then check the Windows system event log for around that time to see if there are any warnings or errors preceding the shutdown.

What model of Samsung SSD do you have? Have you run any testing on the SSD using the manufacturer software to check its status?

If you haven't done so, install software to check your CPU and GPU temps to see if they are overheating.

It also wouldn't hurt to run SFC /scannow from an elevated command prompt to check for system file corruption. Similarly, run CHKDSK on your boot drive in read only mode (i.e. with no switches like /f or /r) to check for file system corruption. If CHKDSK finds file system corruption when run in read only mode, it will terminate the scan giving you the opportunity to back up important files before running CHKDSK /f to fix the file system.

Finally, did it do this before you upgraded to Win10 v2004? That has been a problematic upgrade for some folks.
Thank you fot the reply!
The pc is simply just shutting off, and then it starts again (I think this is because of the restart windows after a crash setting). The only thing in the reliability history was "Windows was not properly shut down". When i look at the event viewer the only thing that is there are a bunch of DeviceManagement-Enterprise-Diagnostics-Provider errors (event id 454).

I will try testing the ssd.

I am fairly sure that my cpu and gpu arent overheating, but i will look further into it. Are there any other temperatures i should watch out for? My cpu right now is about 35 degrees C, and my gpu is 62 degrees.

I have ran the sfc /scannow thing, but it didnt have any violations. I am unsure of how to do the CHKDSK thing, because i dont really know how to set my boot drive to read only mode with no switches like /f /r.

I am unsure of if it happened before the update, but i will try to find out.

I really appreciate the help.
 
Last edited:

Steltek

Platinum Member
Mar 29, 2001
2,522
352
126
CHKDSK c: will work.

If it is just shutting off and restarting, I would immediately suspect the PSU. The PSU you have was not a very good one when it was new, and it certainly isn't any better now.

If you can lay hands on a spare PSU to test with, set it up outside the case and just swap all the power leads over. That way, you aren't wasting time physically swapping the units until you know your existing PSU is bad.
 

VirtualLarry

Lifer
Aug 25, 2001
49,545
5,604
126
Agreed with @Steltek . If PC is powering off / rebooting, chances are it's temps or PSU, and if you've installed software and are monitoring your temps, and they aren't elevated to a point of concern, then, most likely, it's PSU. (Could be RAM, on rare occasion too, but you said I believe that you ran a Memtest.)
 

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