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Question Patch panel and nest router setup

farshadatis

Junior Member
Nov 10, 2019
5
0
11
We moved to new home and trying to add my nest wifi router here, there is a patch panel that has a switch, I am trying to use wired network in some of the rooms and as well is wireless by adding nest wifi router, but the panel is way back on corner of the house and can't put my nest router in there.
Right now I have to use another router inside patch panel and then nest router connects to one of the wired connections in our living room, it is working but basically other wired connections are in another network and can't see wireless devices.
As you can see in this picture, the white cable is coming from ONT and connected to switch.
Should I put nest router before switch here or there is another way to solve it without adding it there?
Thanks
 

SamirD

Golden Member
Jun 12, 2019
1,487
276
96
www.huntsvillecarscene.com
You're on the right path. :) You need to get your nest to work as just an access point and then devices connected to it will see the rest of the network. Right now the nest is making its own network and that's the issue. If there isn't an access point mode on it, use the other router in access point mode and put the next in the wiring closet.

The main concept on these type of installations is that the router has to go where all the wires are and then access points have to go on the network at the ends. This is different than the typical access point/router combo setup.

One thing additional that you may be able to take advantage of is that the numbnut who wired it ran telephone wires to a separate punch down panel. If you change that panel to one like this that you can get at home depot, you can re-terminate the ends to ethernet and use those ports for ethernet as well:

Most numbnut electricians who wire this stuff have no idea what they're really doing, and don't know that telephone can work over a connection wired for ethernet as the ethernet wiring spec was purposely made to work that way (telephone uses the first 2 pairs of ethernet just like it normally would).

Hope this helps and happy networking!
 
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farshadatis

Junior Member
Nov 10, 2019
5
0
11
You're on the right path. :) You need to get your nest to work as just an access point and then devices connected to it will see the rest of the network. Right now the nest is making its own network and that's the issue. If there isn't an access point mode on it, use the other router in access point mode and put the next in the wiring closet.

The main concept on these type of installations is that the router has to go where all the wires are and then access points have to go on the network at the ends. This is different than the typical access point/router combo setup.

One thing additional that you may be able to take advantage of is that the numbnut who wired it ran telephone wires to a separate punch down panel. If you change that panel to one like this that you can get at home depot, you can re-terminate the ends to ethernet and use those ports for ethernet as well:

Most numbnut electricians who wire this stuff have no idea what they're really doing, and don't know that telephone can work over a connection wired for ethernet as the ethernet wiring spec was purposely made to work that way (telephone uses the first 2 pairs of ethernet just like it normally would).

Hope this helps and happy networking!
Thanks for your reply :)
I am not sure if I am able to change nest router to AP, couldn't find any settings on it.
Your suggestion is to put a router as AP inside the panel, between the switch and ONT/modem and then place nest router anywhere in home?

This way my wired devices will access same network as nest router? Will I be able to use nest management capabilities on all devices (wired and wireless)?

Also thanks for your suggestion about the box, so basically if I do that I can have more wired connections through my home right?
 

SamirD

Golden Member
Jun 12, 2019
1,487
276
96
www.huntsvillecarscene.com
Thanks for your reply :)
I am not sure if I am able to change nest router to AP, couldn't find any settings on it.
Your suggestion is to put a router as AP inside the panel, between the switch and ONT/modem and then place nest router anywhere in home?

This way my wired devices will access same network as nest router? Will I be able to use nest management capabilities on all devices (wired and wireless)?

Also thanks for your suggestion about the box, so basically if I do that I can have more wired connections through my home right?
Bummer. That's why I hate consumer crap like that. You'll need to put the nest in the closet to be the router. It's wifi will still be on, but not be of much use. Take the other router and set it up as an access point. The nest should still be able to manage wireless devices connected to the access point (if it implements management correctly on a per mac basis).

Yep, if you change out that punch down panel and repunch the wires and then possibly re-punch the wall plate ends (they may already be cat5), then you should have some extra ethernet runs. :) And any ethernet run can be used as telephone wire with an rj45 adapter as telephone wire uses the same first 2 pairs that ethernet already has.
 
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DaaQ

Senior member
Dec 8, 2018
521
302
106
Any of the wall outlets have two cat 5s in them? then you could run like Samir said with the new punch down panel, to a more desirable location then use second run back to patch panel for the AP basically a double port keystone or wall plate. But it has to have 2 separate cat5/6 wires coming from the patch panel.
 
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farshadatis

Junior Member
Nov 10, 2019
5
0
11
Any of the wall outlets have two cat 5s in them? then you could run like Samir said with the new punch down panel, to a more desirable location then use second run back to patch panel for the AP basically a double port keystone or wall plate. But it has to have 2 separate cat5/6 wires coming from the patch panel.
Thanks, I am going to try that :)
 

Fallen Kell

Diamond Member
Oct 9, 1999
5,663
250
126
Yeah, I really wish home builders would get with the 21st century now and use a central location in the home for the network closet and not just the closet closest to the entry wall. I get it that there will need to be something on that initial wall, but all that is really needed are lines that then go to a central location, preferably through a 2-3inch diameter PVC or similar conduit with a pull line. That way in 10-20 years as technology changes/upgrades, it is easy for the home owner to then just run the new technology wires from the entrance way right into their central closet.

By not using a central location, they are adding hundreds of meters of extra wiring needed to cover a home in most situations (think of all the ones that set it on the far garage wall, which means each cable that is run needs to cross the length of the garage, where-as if it was in a central location in the home, aside from the incoming line, and possibly a single drop into the garage, all the other lines would never otherwise need to traverse that distance to their end points, and the same is true for telephone lines, and cable TV distribution, not just network drops which most builders still don't do).
 
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