paedophiles to be tracked by satellite

LeadMagnet

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Mar 26, 2003
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Article


Paedophiles are to be electronically tagged in the UK for the first time in a move that could prompt a revolution in the treatment and monitoring of sex offenders.
A British company is to hold talks with Ministers in the next few weeks with a view to launching a Home Office-backed trial involving between 100 and 500 child sex offenders. It is also talking to government officials in the United States, Italy and Ireland and is to tag a number of paedophiles who have volunteered to wear the device.

Sky Guardian will unveil the first electronic device made specifically to track paedophiles at this month's Labour party conference and is to test the technology on a volunteer MP this week.

Civil liberty groups expressed deep concerns last night. 'If they have been released, they should be free to live their life in liberty. This muddies the waters between guilt and innocence,' said Mark Littlewood, campaigns director of Liberty.

'This is more likely to make them feel alienated. Once released they should be made to feel a normal member of the community.'

But the news is likely to be greeted favourably by child protection campaigners who have long called for the obligatory tagging of paedophiles.

Labour MP Dan Norris, a former social worker who specialised in child protection and will volunteer to be fitted with a tag this week, said: 'I know the danger that paedophiles pose. It can never stop the bad things that bad people do but it can minimise the risk. This is a potential revolutionary technology but we need to know whether it works. I intend to give it a proper test.'

Until now the technology to constantly monitor offenders has been suspect and paedophile experts have expressed fears that it did not allow for instant communication with offenders, which they say is crucial if it is to stop paedophiles reoffending.

Unlike tags now used to enforce curfews for general criminal offenders, which communicate on localised radio frequencies, the new device uses global satellite positioning technology. This will allow probation services and police to pinpoint the wearer anywhere in the UK to within three metres.

The device is capable of providing a detailed diary at the end of every day of where the user has been.

The electronic diary can be studied remotely by experts to build up a profile of the offender which will help them predict whether the person will offend again.

The new technology, which is attached to a person's ankle, is adapted from electronic tags fitted to offenders in the United States. The device has a wireless connection to a special mobile phone carried by the offender at all times. If the phone, which is linked to a call centre staffed by trained paedophile experts, is separated from the tag an alarm is triggered.

'This level of communication with an offender is absolutely essential if a mature and effective form of management is to work,' said Clive Crosby, managing director of Sky Guardian.

'To be able to have "Talk down" with an offender because he is in a high-risk area and likely to offend is the single most effective control measure that be applied,' Crosby added.

Home Secretary David Blunkett has expressed support for tagging paedophiles in the past and is keen to test the new GPS technology. Following the murder of Sarah Payne, Blunkett wrote: 'We are interested in tagging sex offenders released on supervision into the community, not least to ensure that they stick to the agreed location.'

The tag's appeal to police forces and probation services is obvious, but Ray Wyre, an expert on sex offenders who is working with Sky Guardian, said there were advantages for registered paedophiles, as well.

'Because it tracks where they go every day it would mean they would not have to be picked up every time there is an offence committed,' Wyre said.

'If you have a major investigation it takes up so much police time. This would be able to exclude them from the start.'

Wyre said the new technology was far cheaper than the current tagging devices used to enforce curfews and probation orders which costs around £500 per offender each month.

'We've heard the Government wants to pilot a scheme. This technology is so much more advanced than anything out there at the moment. Our feeling is to try it for 500 people. It costs around half the price,' Wyre said.


Article
 

PatboyX

Diamond Member
Aug 10, 2001
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i dont think i condone the implatation of tracking devices in/on human regardless of what type of person they are. i understand the positives in this case but it seems to open the door for a lot of scary options.
 

CADsortaGUY

Lifer
Oct 19, 2001
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www.ShawCAD.com
Originally posted by: PatboyX
i dont think i condone the implatation of tracking devices in/on human regardless of what type of person they are. i understand the positives in this case but it seems to open the door for a lot of scary options.

True dat.

CkG
 

Electrode

Diamond Member
May 4, 2001
6,063
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Originally posted by: CADkindaGUY
Originally posted by: PatboyX
i dont think i condone the implatation of tracking devices in/on human regardless of what type of person they are. i understand the positives in this case but it seems to open the door for a lot of scary options.

True dat.

CkG
 

Bowfinger

Lifer
Nov 17, 2002
15,776
392
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I like this dangerous bit of logic:
The tag's appeal to police forces and probation services is obvious, but Ray Wyre, an expert on sex offenders who is working with Sky Guardian, said there were advantages for registered paedophiles, as well.

'Because it tracks where they go every day it would mean they would not have to be picked up every time there is an offence committed,' Wyre said.

'If you have a major investigation it takes up so much police time. This would be able to exclude them from the start.'
Talk about your slippery slopes. We'll tag you for your own protection. Who is next? Other sex offenders? Gang members? Burglars? Shoplifters? Speeders? Liberals? Heck, let's tag everybody. It will be so much simpler for police. We don't have to investigate anything, we just check the logs. It's all for your own good. If you never do anything wrong, you have nothing to worry about.

It's worse than 1984. You couldn't even escape to a meadow for a few minutes without surveillance.

I know their intentions are good, but some doors should not be opened.
 

Moonbeam

Elite Member
Nov 24, 1999
72,386
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We know this is the future, the end of crime. We will all have chips and our life history, heart beat, emotional state, and location will be a matter of record.
 

Dari

Lifer
Oct 25, 2002
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This is great news. Now there may be an alert whenever they enter a school zone or something. Personally, I think these people should be state-owned concubines for the nation's prison system. It'll be an Open Ass Policy, if you will. But, hey, that's just me.

As for the privacy issue, while I'm the biggest advocate of privacy, we are already being tracked in myriad ways. From social security to credit cards to GPS to the USA P.A.T.R.I.O.T. Act, the big brother scenerio is here in all but name.
 

Wag

Diamond Member
Jul 21, 2000
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I say we just put shock collars on all of them and put electronic barriers up in appropriate places, (school zones, etc).
 

konichiwa

Lifer
Oct 9, 1999
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Have we completely lost the idea of a rehabilitating time in prison as a payment for debt to society? It seems like most criminals nowadays (pedophiles and other child molesters especially) are forced to live their entire life indebted to society even though they may be sentenced to only a few years in prison...
 

Wag

Diamond Member
Jul 21, 2000
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I was being sarcastic.

That said, paedophiles are special case- their recidivism rate is almost 100%- meaning they're pretty much uncurable. Ok, so they do their time, what then? I know I sure as hell don't want my family living next door to one.
 

burnedout

Diamond Member
Oct 12, 1999
6,249
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Originally posted by: Wag
I was being sarcastic.

That said, paedophiles are special case- their recidivism rate is almost 100%- meaning they're pretty much uncurable. Ok, so they do their time, what then? I know I sure as hell don't want my family living next door to one.
Ditto. I don't need a murder conviction and my AR-15 HB Match confiscated either.
 

noproblems

Senior member
Mar 11, 2000
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Just because a society chooses to employ this type of technology to its worst-case-scenario criminals doesn't mean that 'big brother' will come calling to the average Tom, Dick, or Suzy who walks our streets.

I do feel that we shouldn't just lock up pedophiles forever for their crimes. First of all, it costs too much money and second it causes an incogruity to exist within our practice of 'fair sentencing.'

I say we are well within our rights to protect our children from these vicious predators, and that these type of offenders require extended observation because of the shocking rate of recidivism. I suppose some people believe that we should give these pedophiles a second chance and that they should be afforded an opportunity to start over without any 'labels'. The problem is, though, that these criminals have already crossed a line with their behaviors. They are no longer shocked at the proposition of having sex with a child, and, as a matter of fact have demonstrated that regardless of the long term affects that their crimes have on children, they will overwhelmingly choose to repeat their crime.

I say that these convicted molestors would like freedom and deserve 99.99% of the freedoms that are afforded the rest of our citizens once they have done their time. Certainly, they can give up 1/100 of a percent of their freedom to help atone to their victims by allowing their victims to be less fearful that someone else will have to go through what they did during the commission of the heinous criminal act.
 

konichiwa

Lifer
Oct 9, 1999
15,077
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Originally posted by: Wag
I was being sarcastic.

That said, paedophiles are special case- their recidivism rate is almost 100%- meaning they're pretty much uncurable. Ok, so they do their time, what then? I know I sure as hell don't want my family living next door to one.

If that can be proven, then change the sentence for pedophilia to life. Simple as that...but don't give them the false notion that they're "free" or that they've paid their debt only to track them with silly laws and satellites -- sheesh.
 

Wag

Diamond Member
Jul 21, 2000
8,286
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If that can be proven, then change the sentence for pedophilia to life. Simple as that...but don't give them the false notion that they're "free" or that they've paid their debt only to track them with silly laws and satellites -- sheesh.
Shades of Minority Report. You cannot lock someone up for crimes they "might" commit. Well, not yet anyways, give Ashcroft time...
 

PatboyX

Diamond Member
Aug 10, 2001
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Originally posted by: Wag
If that can be proven, then change the sentence for pedophilia to life. Simple as that...but don't give them the false notion that they're "free" or that they've paid their debt only to track them with silly laws and satellites -- sheesh.
Shades of Minority Report. You cannot lock someone up for crimes they "might" commit. Well, not yet anyways, give Ashcroft time...

the prophet philip k. dick!
 

konichiwa

Lifer
Oct 9, 1999
15,077
2
0
Originally posted by: Wag
If that can be proven, then change the sentence for pedophilia to life. Simple as that...but don't give them the false notion that they're "free" or that they've paid their debt only to track them with silly laws and satellites -- sheesh.
Shades of Minority Report. You cannot lock someone up for crimes they "might" commit. Well, not yet anyways, give Ashcroft time...

I didn't suggest that we should lock people up for crimes that they haven't committed. The point of post-prison-parole is rehabilitation; it is assumed that after X years (based on the crime), one is rehabilitated and can be reinstituted into society.

If it is assumed that a pedophile can never be rehabilitated, then, by definition, his penalty should be life in prison (or death but I'm not really willing to bring that argument in here)
 

Sternfan

Senior member
May 24, 2003
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This behavior is completely unacceptable; if you do this to a child you die plain and simple. To me this is the most unforgivable crime that I can think of. I have a 4 year old and if anyone ever did something like this to him there would be no trial. I would take matters into my own hands. Try to find 12 people in VA that would convict me for killing such a monster. There is a good argument for technology like this but like everything else there can be abuses but I say common sense can easily dictate the rules as long as the rules are not created behind closed doors.
 

Orsorum

Lifer
Dec 26, 2001
27,631
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We all know that children are known for their concrete memories and lack of suggestibility. What better way to deal with crimes the nature of which we are certain than to forever ruin the lives of the accused.
 

alchemize

Lifer
Mar 24, 2000
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Originally posted by: Orsorum
We all know that children are known for their concrete memories and lack of suggestibility. What better way to deal with crimes the nature of which we are certain than to forever ruin the lives of the accused.

That's what the courts are for. This article is about convicted pedophiles.
 

Orsorum

Lifer
Dec 26, 2001
27,631
5
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Originally posted by: alchemize
Originally posted by: Orsorum
We all know that children are known for their concrete memories and lack of suggestibility. What better way to deal with crimes the nature of which we are certain than to forever ruin the lives of the accused.

That's what the courts are for. This article is about convicted pedophiles.

Just like we know that all people on death row deserve to die.
 

alchemize

Lifer
Mar 24, 2000
11,489
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Originally posted by: Orsorum
Originally posted by: alchemize
Originally posted by: Orsorum
We all know that children are known for their concrete memories and lack of suggestibility. What better way to deal with crimes the nature of which we are certain than to forever ruin the lives of the accused.

That's what the courts are for. This article is about convicted pedophiles.

Just like we know that all people on death row deserve to die.

May not deserve to, but they've been convicted by a jury of their peers. I'll let got sort out the "deserved" part. Personally I'm against the death penalty. But I'm not against the law of the land.

I'd rather have a pedophile spend life in prison than a drug dealer. And I'd sure want to know if one moves into my neighborhood. In fact, our state requires their registration and I check frequently on our neighborhood. There are 22 registered sex offenders in my teeny tiny town of 10,000. In fact, I just looked it up right now and found one has moved in just down the street from us in some apartments. I'm memorizing his face and name.

NAME: MICHAEL D PXXXXXXXX
DOB: 6/22/1979
HGT: 5ft.09in.
WGT: 164 lbs.
RACE: W
SEX: M
ADDRESS : 1914 XXXXXXXXXXXXX
Apt.D
CITY : XXXXXXXXXXX
ZIP : XXXXXXXXXXX
VICTIM UNDER THE AGE OF 18



Maybe you'll assume this guy was railroaded. I won't. Damn I'm glad this thread came up I haven't checked in quite a while.


Maybe one of your kids will get diddled some day and you'll change your tune. I intend to prevent it.
 

alchemize

Lifer
Mar 24, 2000
11,489
0
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Originally posted by: Orsorum
And you would decry these people of being able to live a normal, unassuming life?

Am I supposed to get all weepy and say "oh the injustice" now? Every law and every crime ever committed has had at least one injustice done. So what. 99% of them don't. For every 1,000,000 justices, there's 1 injustice. I'll live with it.

All I care about is the little sick bastard that lives in walking distance from me that has been convicted of one of the following:

What offenses are subject to Sex Offender Registration?

* Indecent Solicitation of a child;
* Sexual Exploitation of a child;
* Soliciting for a Juvenile Prostitute;
* Keeping a place of Juvenile Prostitution;
* Patronizing a Juvenile Prostitute;
* Juvenile Pimping;
* Exploitation of a Child;
* Child Pornography;
* Criminal Sexual Assault;
* Aggravated Criminal Sexual Assault;
* Predatory Crimial Sexual Assault of a Child;
* Criminal Sexual Abuse, when a felony;
* Aggravated Criminal Sexual Abuse;
* Ritualized Abuse of a Child;
* Forcible Detention, if the victim is under 18 years of age;
* Indecent Solicitation of an Adult;
* Soliciting for a Prostitute, if the victim is under 18 years of age;
* Pandering, if the victim is under 18 years of age;
* Patronizing, if the victim is under 18 years of age;
* Pimping, if the victim is under 18 years of age; and
* Any attempt to commit the above offenses.

The old "he got busted with a hooker" or "he got busted for sex with his 15 year old girlfriend", argument doesn't work, cause those aren't included.

If you ever need a babysitter, let me know and I'll give you this guys address. Then you can go "decrying the injustice" all you want by making a point that you TRUST him!
 

burnedout

Diamond Member
Oct 12, 1999
6,249
2
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Originally posted by: Orsorum
And you would decry these people of being able to live a normal, unassuming life?
I've personally known of three cases in which men were falsely accused of molesting their stepdaughters. One involved my cousin's husband while the other two were acquaintances. In two of the cases, had it not been for very competent, determined social workers and detectives, both men would have went to prison. The last case finally reached resolution two years later after a ruined marriage in which the stepdaughter admitted lying. This guy requested and received a transfer to Korea. The incident almost ruined his Army career as he had 18 year in at the time.

All three cases involved "troubled" stepdaughters.