P4 3.6GHz "Prescott" cooling issues

CharlieR

Junior Member
Nov 6, 2004
15
0
0
:disgust:Upon deciding to build a new system I chose the ASUS P5AD2 Premium, along with Corsair DDR2 XMS2, an Enermax 600W "Noisetaker" power supply, and a P4 775 560 "Prescott" processor. I've not been able to install XP Pro because the system shuts down due to overheating during the install - the system idles at 65 degrees C. Following Intel's advice, I purchased a new case and the problem persists. Intel is now shipping me a new P4. After removing the questionable processor, upon close examination of the motherboard, I found a pin missing in the ASUS motherboards? processor socket. ASUS tech support reviewed my situation and stated it was not anything I'd done and suggested I go back to the vendor I'd bought it from since it was still in the first 30 days following the purchase. AJUMP.COM REFUSED TO EXCHANGE THE BOARD STATING I HAD DAMAGED IT.

As for as the board goes - I believe it to be a great choice offering the best in expansion capabilities. I took months deciding upon my components. I've found ASUS tech support to be excellent. Corsair was also excellent in helping me with the correct settings for their memory.

AVOID AJUMP.COM - THEY WILL IGNORE YOU IF SOMETHING GOES WRONG AND LEAVE YOU WITH DAMAGED GOODS!
 

Antoneo

Diamond Member
May 25, 2001
3,911
0
0
Sorry to hear your troubles. But how is the motherboard missing a pinhole? Does the P4 processor fit into the socket or does it refuse to go in?
 

Wingznut

Elite Member
Dec 28, 1999
16,968
2
0
Originally posted by: Antoneo
Sorry to hear your troubles. But how is the motherboard missing a pinhole? Does the P4 processor fit into the socket or does it refuse to go in?
The pins are on the motherboard.... Not the processor.

 

Antoneo

Diamond Member
May 25, 2001
3,911
0
0
Originally posted by: Wingznut
Originally posted by: Antoneo
Sorry to hear your troubles. But how is the motherboard missing a pinhole? Does the P4 processor fit into the socket or does it refuse to go in?
The pins are on the motherboard.... Not the processor.
Ohhhhh now it makes sense. I forgot to note that it was LGA775 based.
 

Gurck

Banned
Mar 16, 2004
12,963
1
0
They have a pretty good rating at Resellerratings. I don't fully understand the problem either - are you saying that a pin broke off and is lodged in the socket on the motherboard?
 

Shooters

Diamond Member
Sep 29, 2000
3,100
0
76
Originally posted by: Gurck
I don't fully understand the problem either - are you saying that a pin broke off and is lodged in the socket on the motherboard?

For LGA775 sockets, the pins are on the motherboard.

pic
 

RadiclDreamer

Diamond Member
Aug 8, 2004
8,622
40
91
Originally posted by: Gurck
They have a pretty good rating at Resellerratings. I don't fully understand the problem either - are you saying that a pin broke off and is lodged in the socket on the motherboard?

775 boards have the pins in the socket, not on the cpu. The cpu is flat with NO PINS.
 

cheesehead

Lifer
Aug 11, 2000
10,079
0
0
It may be that the pin has nothing to do with the overheating, and is simply an unnecessary part of the computer. (think the 940'th pin in socket-939 systems). Ajump.com seems to be a shade dodgy about this, though-if a pin breaks off during normal use, that's a problem with the motherboard. This is comprable to Ford saying your repair is not under warranty when you take out your key, and half the starter wiring is yanked out with it.
Out of curiousity, what kind of heatsink are you using? A Thermalright XP-120 or SP-97 can do wonders for cooling, especially when used with Arctic Silver.
 

imported_Phil

Diamond Member
Feb 10, 2001
9,837
0
0
Originally posted by: Computer MAn
I believe socket 775 uses a BGA.

Then you believe wrong.
Socket-775 is otherwise referred to as Socket-T (never caught on) or LGA-775.

LGA = Land Grid Array.
BGA = Ball Grid Array.