Overclocking & risk

Discussion in 'CPUs and Overclocking' started by highend, Nov 8, 2012.

  1. highend

    highend Member

    Joined:
    Sep 11, 2012
    Messages:
    56
    Likes Received:
    0
    Compressing, encoding, etc., isn't my priority, as I've mentioned. When I do that, I read or write, or watch movies, etc., things that I'd be doing anyway. It isn't worth sacrificing frame rates for that, even if it's 5FPS, from 60 to 55. And I don't know what's a Micro Center. :)

    Actually it's not cheaper, 2500K is $2 cheaper than 3570K. I'm not going to pay for used tech unless I'd get the same 3 year warranty. I couldn't afford a CPU replacement in case it'd burn and I am NOT willing to take that risk.

    I am also unsure what is "mfg."

    It's $140 difference between 3570K and 3770K, so I am settling on either 3470, 3570 or 3570K.
     
  2. Arkaign

    Arkaign Lifer

    Joined:
    Oct 27, 2006
    Messages:
    19,305
    Likes Received:
    1
    It wouldn't be 5FPS (60FPS to 55FPS) going from IB to SB, that's insanely huge. At the same clocks, it'd be more like 59.6FPS vs. 60.1FPS or something of that nature. As a matter of fact, an average SB overclock of 4.5Ghz-4.8Ghz will make things as fast or faster than most IB overclocks. If your 3570K stalls at 4.2Ghz without excessive volts, but your 2500K hits 4.6Ghz with fairly low volts, you're going to have a faster system with that 2500K.

    Also where on earth are you getting your prices?

    Micro Center is a retailer. The 2500K is $159, the 3570K is $169 (as of a week or two ago), etc.

    mfg = manufacturing. Ivy Bridge manufacturing quality is extremely variable. Some are fantastic, some are terrible, most are pretty mediocre. They changed the solder-mounted IHS system for a much less robust system with questionable TIM. See the delidding thread, Intel basically caused a ~20C rise in temps in some cases (overclocking) by cheaping out on this. Delidded (no warranty of course) Ivy Bridge can overclock much better than an average stock Ivy Bridge.
     
  3. Arkaign

    Arkaign Lifer

    Joined:
    Oct 27, 2006
    Messages:
    19,305
    Likes Received:
    1
  4. highend

    highend Member

    Joined:
    Sep 11, 2012
    Messages:
    56
    Likes Received:
    0
    I don't live in the US, CA, UK, prices here are higher. The prices I posted are the CHEAPEST available, other stores offer even costlier CPUs.

    Anyway, regarding overclocking, I would still like to clarify everything. I've posted the things I want clarified, however didn't an a "sure" answer yet.

    I'm not going to do it, but I'm definitely gonna read it for the sake of curiosity. Thanks! :)
     
  5. KingFatty

    KingFatty Diamond Member

    Joined:
    Dec 29, 2010
    Messages:
    3,025
    Likes Received:
    1
    What about being very selective about when you overclock? Just leave the chip at stock speeds all the time, and then when you want a "boost" you can overclock.

    Also, you mentioned lasting 5 yrs, well, why not just leave the chip at stock speeds for the first 2 years, then do a tiny overclock for the 3rd year to get you used to the idea, and then go with a crazy huge overclock for years 4 and 5? that way, if you do blow up the chip at the 4.5 year mark, you are almost ready to upgrade anyway?

    I know personally that I tend to mentally decide that I'm "ripe" for an upgrade, even though I continue to use my old system. It's like flipping a mental switch - once you are ripe for upgrade and flip that switch, you can totally abuse your hardware and even try to break it with aggressive overclocking, because if you break it, that's just another step on the way to upgrading, and easier to justify the cost to your spouse. "It broke, I need a new one."

    But also think about your past behavior - how long did you hold on to your chip before upgrading?

    Also, even when I follow this routine, I've never had a CPU fail on me. I was very unforgiving but the CPU was stronger...
     
  6. highend

    highend Member

    Joined:
    Sep 11, 2012
    Messages:
    56
    Likes Received:
    0
    That won't work, unless I could overclock it without a restart. And even then, it would get very annoying overclocking and declocking every half an hour... I don't think it'd be good for the CPU too.

    No, I don't have that mentality, I can't - it depends on me saving money, and I save everything I can to be able to afford a new computer.

    My past behavior was 6 years for both PCs without any overclocking. 6 years is about the period of time I need to save enough money for a new one of high-average quality PC.
     
  7. Arkaign

    Arkaign Lifer

    Joined:
    Oct 27, 2006
    Messages:
    19,305
    Likes Received:
    1
    Most mobos, such as the decent Asus and AsRock models, have utilities that let you control clocks speed from within windows.

    Also, CPUs regularly adjust automatically for clock speed and voltage anyway, it's not bad for it.
     
  8. highend

    highend Member

    Joined:
    Sep 11, 2012
    Messages:
    56
    Likes Received:
    0
    That doesn't sound half-bad. But I still do game for 6-18h a day for the most part. Some days I do other stuff as mentioned earlier, some days I game. So it would be overclocked for the most part anyway.
     
  9. Denithor

    Denithor Diamond Member

    Joined:
    Apr 11, 2004
    Messages:
    6,256
    Likes Received:
    11
    One further idea for consideration - is there a used market in your country? There are some unbelievable deals available on various outlets here in the USA - eBay, Craigslist - you can sometimes find components (or entire systems) 40-50% or more off retail for relatively recent gear. If there are such markets for used components available to you, buy used for cheaper and plan to upgrade more often.

    If that is simply not an option, spend a little more on a good cooling system, keep your OC moderate and you'll be fine.

    EDIT: As an afterthought - I don't know what your current setup is like or how badly you need to upgrade. But Haswell is scheduled to launch in about six months, it honestly might be worth waiting until then before buying. Haswell will have a whole slew of new features built in that are not available on today's chips. And although it might take a couple of years for those features to be implemented, if you keep your setup for 6 years you might seriously be wishing for those features well before you upgrade next time.
     
    #34 Denithor, Nov 8, 2012
    Last edited: Nov 8, 2012
  10. BD231

    BD231 Diamond Member

    Joined:
    Feb 26, 2001
    Messages:
    9,821
    Likes Received:
    2
    Then id stick to default voltage overclocking and only go one step over. If u get stuck at 4ghz you shouldnt need much extra voltage at all to reach 4.2 to 4.3 (on sandy anyway). Cpus are definitely not the tanks they used to be but with the lack of competition intel has been conservative with clocks.
     
  11. highend

    highend Member

    Joined:
    Sep 11, 2012
    Messages:
    56
    Likes Received:
    0
    No, unfortunately that is not an option here.

    As for Haswell, I sense that it may get delayed to the end of 2013, and anyway, reviews won't show up instantly. So that would be a bit more than 6 months. My current system is 6 years old, so I need an upgrade pretty badly, unfortunately.

    I appreciate the suggestions.

    I think it can 4.2Ghz can be reached with no extra voltage. :)
     
  12. Denithor

    Denithor Diamond Member

    Joined:
    Apr 11, 2004
    Messages:
    6,256
    Likes Received:
    11
    Well, that pretty much sucks because IB is the end of the line for socket 1155. So you won't even be able to upgrade just your cpu in 2-3 years to a more powerful chip (which would be an option if you waited for Haswell).

    Also, reviews really do show up pretty much instantly, all the review sites have the new chips in-house for testing well in advance of the launch date and are prevented from releasing their results by NDA with Intel. The info comes out usually just before launch (helps to hype things up and get sales moving).

    EDIT: What kind of system do you have currently? CPU/GPU/RAM/PSU are the major parts of interest. Do you have an SSD already or not? Perhaps we could suggest some relatively minor upgrades that would help you limp along until Haswell comes out.
     
  13. jacktesterson

    jacktesterson Diamond Member

    Joined:
    Sep 28, 2001
    Messages:
    5,490
    Likes Received:
    2
    2500k here on a cheap model P67 board since launch, running at 1.4v 24/7 @ 4.5 GHz

    Never a hiccup.
     
  14. highend

    highend Member

    Joined:
    Sep 11, 2012
    Messages:
    56
    Likes Received:
    0
    Currently I have 2GB of memory, Athlon 5000+ CPU, 7600GT video card, no SSD, 500W average (low-high quality) PSU bought about a year ago, maybe a bit more.
     
  15. cytg111

    cytg111 Platinum Member

    Joined:
    Mar 17, 2008
    Messages:
    2,864
    Likes Received:
    108
    cant find the thread right now, but a few months back someone posted some statistics on datacorruption vs overclocks ... interresting read, wish i'd bookmarked/saved it ..