Oops! Biden's turn in the Classified Documents barrel.

Page 22 - Seeking answers? Join the AnandTech community: where nearly half-a-million members share solutions and discuss the latest tech.

fskimospy

Elite Member
Mar 10, 2006
78,569
37,547
136
Yea, it is a systemic problem. I worked for the VA in a very low level medical research position. Even there we were not allowed to take documents home, and any e-mails containing patient information or clinical data had to be sent over an encrypted network. Seem like the higher up in the government one goes, the less attention is paid to security. There simply has to be more accountability.
I hate to break it to you:

In 2022, an average of 1.94 healthcare data breaches of 500 or more records were reported each day.
That’s a minimum of about 1,000 ‘classified’ information breaches every single day. Every. Single. Day.
 

hal2kilo

Lifer
Feb 24, 2009
21,101
8,036
136
Classified documents just found in Mike Pence's home.


Hoping these discoveries may motivate the current and future administration to be a little more careful with classified docs? I know that POTUS/VP's will take working copies of documents with them when going home, but someone's got to be responsible for returning or shredding them.
Oops! There goes another rubber tree plant.
 

hal2kilo

Lifer
Feb 24, 2009
21,101
8,036
136
See what I mean, @blackangst1? I don’t think Pence did this on purpose, it’s just a common occurrence.

Administrations (ok, not Trump) spend a lot of time and effort on classified material control. In my opinion the problem is the volume of classified material is so huge, there are so many people involved, and by necessity it is mixed with unclassified information that mistakes are inevitable. I think the scandal here is people never realized that this happens all the time and thought the government works like a Tom Clancy novel or something.

One thing that would help is to sharply limit what the US government considers classified but good luck with that. Outside of that or an enormous expenditure of resources and impediment to the functions of government we should accept that this happens and will always happen.

This isn’t to say that we should abandon attempts to control it and it doesn’t mean we shouldn’t criticize those who make those mistakes and/or punish people when merited. It’s that we should understand reality.
Up until 9/11 they actively downgraded the clearances for the shop I was supporting. Which caused quite a few headaches, when someone up there decided that we would collect all of the patrol navigation data with the new upgraded data acquisition system. Some of the shop guys couldn't support the equipment until their clearances finished being upgraded. Oh, they were told ahead of time, but I have found with experience that the government works in mysterious ways sometimes.
 

eelw

Diamond Member
Dec 4, 1999
7,550
2,788
136
I hate all these congress critters, how dare Biden, Pence, etc take these classified documents outside a secured facility. Umm POTUS/VP need to view these documents wherever they are. These individuals can’t be restricted to a scif unlike congress critters. And yes Pence didn’t remove documents at the end of his administration unlike his orange boss
 
  • Like
Reactions: Pohemi and hal2kilo

feralkid

Lifer
Jan 28, 2002
16,013
3,860
136
Last edited:
  • Haha
Reactions: hal2kilo
Jul 9, 2009
10,688
2,047
136
I went back and reread every single one of your posts (don’t you feel special) and I can’t find a single post that indicates that you understand why the cases are different and why they were handled different. You did acknowledge they were different but there isn’t a single post that shows you actually understand the difference. So which of these posts am I not reading right?



I see this post which shows your ignorance of the facts of the matter.










I see this post where you got the facts wrong again and admitted to it.






Here you acknowledge there are differences but you don’t articulate what they are.


I see you speculating with zero info to back up your opinion.


This is a weird question to be asking if you already understand and know the difference.


Here you state that the difference is the warrant which is almost correct but then you incorrectly cite what the real issue is.


More opinion without a factual basis.




A double down on inaccurate information, information that I’m almost positive was already given to you the first time you made the claim.










You acknowledge that they are two different situations but you seem to not understand why they were handled different.



So is it poor reading on my part? Or will this be yet another correction you’ve had to make in this thread? Honestly I don’t care if you answer or acknowledge that, I just want you to articulate why the two situations are different.
Every situation is different, but you can't get away from the FACT that Biden has illegally taken and possessed Top Secret/classified documents for well over a decade and stored them in extremely insecure locations.
 
  • Haha
Reactions: Pohemi
Jul 9, 2009
10,688
2,047
136
See what I mean, @blackangst1? I don’t think Pence did this on purpose, it’s just a common occurrence.

Administrations (ok, not Trump) spend a lot of time and effort on classified material control. In my opinion the problem is the volume of classified material is so huge, there are so many people involved, and by necessity it is mixed with unclassified information that mistakes are inevitable. I think the scandal here is people never realized that this happens all the time and thought the government works like a Tom Clancy novel or something.

One thing that would help is to sharply limit what the US government considers classified but good luck with that. Outside of that or an enormous expenditure of resources and impediment to the functions of government we should accept that this happens and will always happen.

This isn’t to say that we should abandon attempts to control it and it doesn’t mean we shouldn’t criticize those who make those mistakes and/or punish people when merited. It’s that we should understand reality.
Lol, "it's just a common occurrence" and it's perfectly OK to possess classified/top secret documents unless it's someone we don't like.
 
  • Haha
Reactions: Pohemi

fskimospy

Elite Member
Mar 10, 2006
78,569
37,547
136
Taj:

Innocent until proven guilty, it's no surprise to me that fascists like you want to send innocents to the camps.
Also Taj:
Every situation is different, but you can't get away from the FACT that Biden has illegally taken and possessed Top Secret/classified documents for well over a decade and stored them in extremely insecure locations.
lol.
 
  • Love
  • Like
Reactions: Meghan54 and Pohemi

fskimospy

Elite Member
Mar 10, 2006
78,569
37,547
136
Lol, "it's just a common occurrence" and it's perfectly OK to possess classified/top secret documents unless it's someone we don't like.
Nah, the part I didn't like was the willful refusal to return top secret documents even under subpoena and then the lies to the government about it. You are apparently fine with lying to the government to keep top secret/SCI documents as long as it's someone you like.
 

K1052

Lifer
Aug 21, 2003
42,349
24,262
136
I think a few things can be true at the same time:

1) elected officials have been historically careless about some classified material
2) the classification system has issues and likely too many things are deemed classified
3) intentionally lying to the government that you have classified materials is bad and illegal

Only one guy managed to trip over #3 and proclaim that he did so to the world.
 

feralkid

Lifer
Jan 28, 2002
16,013
3,860
136
I think a few things can be true at the same time:

1) elected officials have been historically careless about some classified material
2) the classification system has issues and likely too many things are deemed classified
3) intentionally lying to the government that you have classified materials is bad and illegal

Only one guy managed to trip over #3 and proclaim that he did so to the world.


If I may:

2(a) Conversely, some material which *should* be classified is sometimes overlooked.
 
  • Like
Reactions: hal2kilo

emperus

Diamond Member
Apr 6, 2012
7,632
1,322
126
I think a few things can be true at the same time:

1) elected officials have been historically careless about some classified material
2) the classification system has issues and likely too many things are deemed classified
3) intentionally lying to the government that you have classified materials is bad and illegal

Only one guy managed to trip over #3 and proclaim that he did so to the world.
This is what is so crazy about Trump. All he had to do was give the documents back.
 

Lanyap

Elite Member
Dec 23, 2000
7,649
1,548
136
JFC it looks like employees of the NARA aren't actually doing their job. Checking out classified documents should be a lot like checking out books at a local library as others have pointed out. When documents are not checked back in to the archive someone there should be requesting them back. It's damn sure not rocket science. The very thought of government employees receiving pay and not doing their jobs, oh the horror.


If republicans want to investigate something legitimate they can start here.

I'm sure we'll see more government officials checking for this.
 
  • Like
Reactions: hal2kilo and Pohemi

ElFenix

Elite Member
Super Moderator
Mar 20, 2000
102,257
7,741
126
Yea, it is a systemic problem. I worked for the VA in a very low level medical research position. Even there we were not allowed to take documents home, and any e-mails containing patient information or clinical data had to be sent over an encrypted network. Seem like the higher up in the government one goes, the less attention is paid to security. There simply has to be more accountability.
are we still hyphenating that term? and why does the plural get an 's' when mail is already plural?
 

woolfe9998

Lifer
Apr 8, 2013
15,283
12,358
136
See what I mean, @blackangst1? I don’t think Pence did this on purpose, it’s just a common occurrence.

Administrations (ok, not Trump) spend a lot of time and effort on classified material control. In my opinion the problem is the volume of classified material is so huge, there are so many people involved, and by necessity it is mixed with unclassified information that mistakes are inevitable. I think the scandal here is people never realized that this happens all the time and thought the government works like a Tom Clancy novel or something.

One thing that would help is to sharply limit what the US government considers classified but good luck with that. Outside of that or an enormous expenditure of resources and impediment to the functions of government we should accept that this happens and will always happen.

This isn’t to say that we should abandon attempts to control it and it doesn’t mean we shouldn’t criticize those who make those mistakes and/or punish people when merited. It’s that we should understand reality.
I think these kinds of mistakes are easily avoidable, actually. It's sloppy, but it's also a product of the common circumstance that a POTUS or VP is extremely busy and may not pay any attention to what becomes of working copies that they take home or to a personal office. I don't know if they take a staffer with them if they mean to work at home. Either way, this is not an unsolvable problem.
 
  • Like
Reactions: hal2kilo and Pohemi

ASK THE COMMUNITY