Old pentium 4

Tovarish Bear

Junior Member
Jun 14, 2019
1
0
6
#1
So my friend has an old PC with Pentium 4 05 in it. After an hour of research I found absolutely nothing about it. Could anyone help me finding out at least what socket is it? Attaching a photo to this post. 9a9d2d23-4d21-492f-86d2-666a49d40940.jpg
 
Oct 27, 2006
19,781
287
126
#2
That's socket 775, but is the pre-Conroe days, so unless very lucky, it will only run P4s and perhaps Pentium D CPUs which are essentially dual P4 on one package.

It looks like a P4 651 Cedar Mill to me. Which is decent news as it's at least somewhat likely that that S775 Mobo would run a 65nm Pentium D as an upgrade, and if very lucky, 65nm Core 2 Duo products to some extent.

Anyway, the most likely possibility would be model 915 through model 960 Pentium D, though sticking to 3.0/3.2Ghz makes cooling much easier.

But look for any codes on the mobo itself, or give us a good pic of the board, and I can tell you more definitely what it is and what it's capable of.
 

SPBHM

Diamond Member
Sep 12, 2012
4,843
69
126
#3
this is a Pentium 4 from 2005/2006 (basically the last), some boards that were paired with it can run Core 2 Duo, so you can look for that, but as said on the previous post that is also likely not the case.

it's very old and outdated, even a core 2 duo is, but this is significantly inferior.
 

Insert_Nickname

Diamond Member
May 6, 2012
3,587
128
126
#4
It looks like a P4 651 Cedar Mill to me. Which is decent news as it's at least somewhat likely that that S775 Mobo would run a 65nm Pentium D as an upgrade, and if very lucky, 65nm Core 2 Duo products to some extent.
I can confirm that's a Cedar Mill P4 651. I happen to have an identical SL94W (B1 revision, so that's the first model) in my CPU collection.

Anyway, the most likely possibility would be model 915 through model 960 Pentium D, though sticking to 3.0/3.2Ghz makes cooling much easier.
I'm not sure it's a good idea to run a Pentium D on such an old board. They're quite power hungry, if the VRMs aren't up to scratch, you could end up with a dead board.

On the plus side, anything modern you can buy new will be significantly faster.
 

Similar threads



ASK THE COMMUNITY