• Guest, The rules for the P & N subforum have been updated to prohibit "ad hominem" or personal attacks against other posters. See the full details in the post "Politics and News Rules & Guidelines."

Oh no, it's the four-letter F word!

zsdersw

Lifer
Oct 29, 2003
10,560
1
0
Nov 30, 2006
15,468
389
121
If you want...you can raise your children in an environment filled with profanity.

However, what's it to you if I choose otherwise?
 

zsdersw

Lifer
Oct 29, 2003
10,560
1
0
If you want...you can raise your children in an environment filled with profanity.

However, what's it to you if I choose otherwise?
Nothing.. I just find it stupid to complain about profanity.

Intent matters more than the word used. When someone says "Ah fudge!" everyone knows they meant to say "fuck", so what's so bad.. exactly.. about the word?
 
Nov 30, 2006
15,468
389
121
You apparently think it doesn't matter whether or not a kid is raised in an environment filled with profanity. I've raised 4 kids and think it does matter. Have you ever raised a child?
 

zsdersw

Lifer
Oct 29, 2003
10,560
1
0
You apparently think it doesn't matter whether or not a kid is raised in an environment filled with profanity. I've raised 4 kids and think it does matter. Have you ever raised a child?
Not personally, but I've been working with children every day for more than 10 years... and have seen plenty of examples of good kids who use profanity and bad kids who don't. In other words, it has no inherent impact on whether they will be a happy, successful, and productive member of society.
 

PokerGuy

Lifer
Jul 2, 2005
13,652
199
101
You apparently think it doesn't matter whether or not a kid is raised in an environment filled with profanity. I've raised 4 kids and think it does matter. Have you ever raised a child?
I agree, I think it does matter. If some of you want to raise your kids as idiots who think using profanity is the way to properly express yourself, feel free to do so, but I prefer to raise kids to know that profanity is not appropriate. Good thing I wasn't planning on buying the garbage urban outfitters sells anyway.
 

Pr0d1gy

Diamond Member
Jan 30, 2005
7,776
0
76
Not personally, but I've been working with children every day for more than 10 years... and have seen plenty of examples of good kids who use profanity and bad kids who don't. In other words, it has no inherent impact on whether they will be a happy, successful, and productive member of society.
Careful, you may ruin Dan's little box he is trying to make the rest of us live in. lol
 

zsdersw

Lifer
Oct 29, 2003
10,560
1
0
If some of you want to raise your kids as idiots who think using profanity is the way to properly express yourself, feel free to do so, but I prefer to raise kids to know that profanity is not appropriate.
If some of you want to raise your kids as idiots who think avoiding certain words matters more than the meaning behind them, feel free to do so.. but I prefer to raise kids to know that a specific word matters less than the meaning and intent being conveyed.
 

zsdersw

Lifer
Oct 29, 2003
10,560
1
0
I agree, I think it does matter. If some of you want to raise your kids as idiots who think using profanity is the way to properly express yourself, feel free to do so, but I prefer to raise kids to know that profanity is not appropriate. Good thing I wasn't planning on buying the garbage urban outfitters sells anyway.
Tell me... do you think it is OK for your children to use a "swear word" from another language other than the one they and their peers normally speak or know?
 

PokerGuy

Lifer
Jul 2, 2005
13,652
199
101
Tell me... do you think it is OK for your children to use a "swear word" from another language other than the one they and their peers normally speak or know?
No, I do not. I don't swear, and I expect them to be able to express themselves without swearing. I understand the occasional word uttered in frustration or anger or something, but in general, there is no need for swearing in any language.
 

zsdersw

Lifer
Oct 29, 2003
10,560
1
0
No, I do not. I don't swear, and I expect them to be able to express themselves without swearing. I understand the occasional word uttered in frustration or anger or something, but in general, there is no need for swearing in any language.
Why is "swearing" necessarily inappropriate?
 
Last edited:

PokerGuy

Lifer
Jul 2, 2005
13,652
199
101
Why is "swearing" necessarily inappropriate?
In general, it's simply unnecessary and it doesn't help communication at all. It usually just indicates a lack of strong vocabulary to articulate ideas.

When measuring the pro and con of using profanity, what are the pro's?
 

zsdersw

Lifer
Oct 29, 2003
10,560
1
0
In general, it's simply unnecessary and it doesn't help communication at all. It usually just indicates a lack of strong vocabulary to articulate ideas.
Lots of things are unnecessary yet remain completely appropriate (Ferrari ashtrays, for example). Communication occurs in many ways, not just in spoken or written/typed forms. Often the quickest and simplest way to communicate an idea or thought is the best one, and in some situations "swearing" is the quickest and simplest way to communicate effectively.

I swear all the time, around people who do not have a problem with it... and yet I can articulate thoughts and ideas pretty well. What does that say?

When measuring the pro and con of using profanity, what are the pro's?
The simplest forms of expressing an idea communicate that idea most clearly with the least chance of misinterpretation.
 
Last edited:

PokerGuy

Lifer
Jul 2, 2005
13,652
199
101
Lots of things are unnecessary yet remain completely appropriate (Ferrari ashtrays, for example). Communication occurs in many ways, not just in spoken or written/typed forms. Often the quickest and simplest way to communicate an idea or thought is the best one.

I swear all the time, around people who do not have a problem with it... and yet I can articulate thoughts and ideas pretty well. What does that say?



The simplest forms of expressing an idea communicate that idea most clearly.
You're failing to factor in the possibility of how others might interpret your speech and react to it. I guess if you're around others you know well and talk similarly, then it doesn't much matter, but if there is anyone around who doesn't act the same way, you're at risk of conveying the wrong message -- for no good reason. I still don't see a "pro" to swearing, there are always other ways of conveying something that works just as simple and just as quickly, provided your vocabulary is up to the task.
 

thraashman

Lifer
Apr 10, 2000
10,911
1,063
126
The idea that some word is profane or wrong simply by being a word is idiotic. In the end it's another form of control. If we make certain words taboo, then we're controlling your speech however small. The whole concept of "bad words" is one of the silliest things we've come up with as a species. The only thing sillier I can think of is trickle down economics.
 

PokerGuy

Lifer
Jul 2, 2005
13,652
199
101
The idea that some word is profane or wrong simply by being a word is idiotic.
Just about all social customs could be seen as "idiotic". Each society has cultural norms of what behavior is deemed objectionable. You don't have to agree to it, and you don't have to abide by it, but then don't be surprised if others see you as an uncultured idiot (which in your case is doubtless an accurate assessment ;) )
 
Nov 30, 2006
15,468
389
121
http://academic.csuohio.edu/kneuendorf/c63310/ArticlesFromClassMembers/Diane.pdf

According to Jay (1992, p. 14), any word that is repeated will induce desensitization. Building on Social Learning theory (Bandura, 1977) and Cultivation theory (Condry, 1989), others have suggested that the desensitizing effects of profanity eventually lead to antisocial behavior. For example, Infante, Riddle, Horvath, and Tumlin (1992) tied verbal aggressiveness to aggressive—even destructive—behavior. Further, Griffiths and Shuckford (1989) found that exposure to profanity, either through media or in everyday life, leads to a dulling of emotional responses.
http://www.uky.edu/~drlane/research/cursing/joc73.pdf

Finally, it was found that using profanity in a communication generally has a detrimental effect on the perceived credibility of the communicator.
 

Jmman

Diamond Member
Dec 17, 1999
5,307
0
76
Over the years I have known individuals where every other word was profanity, and almost universally they were idiots. I am not overly sensitive, but I can certainly understand where this would be offensive to some people.
 

jackstar7

Lifer
Jun 26, 2009
11,679
1,941
126
In general, it's simply unnecessary and it doesn't help communication at all. It usually just indicates a lack of strong vocabulary to articulate ideas.

When measuring the pro and con of using profanity, what are the pro's?
Doesn't help communication at all?

Ha.

So you think there's no difference between 'You're dumb." and "You're fucking dumb." ?

It's language. Every word can matter when it's used properly to communicate. Even words you find to be stigmatized with special powers.
 

ASK THE COMMUNITY

TRENDING THREADS