• Guest, The rules for the P & N subforum have been updated to prohibit "ad hominem" or personal attacks against other posters. See the full details in the post "Politics and News Rules & Guidelines."

Nvidia 1060 GTX sudden death with black screen and no output

Lande

Junior Member
Oct 28, 2020
1
0
6
Hello everyone!. This is my first post in this forum. :)
I was looking for some recommendations regarding my graphic card, that died all of a sudden this monday.

The card is an ASUS Nvidia 1060GTX, and I bought it with a new computer all together at the beginning of 2017, but I have never used the computer until september 2020 because I had a very powerful company laptop. (yes I know, a very bad purchase :p)
So this means, the card is brand new and in other circumstances, I would get rid of it and buy a new one but is sooo new it doesn't even has dirt on the fans yet.

I have tested the card in two different motherboards, with different monitors and cables and no output whatsoever, and today, as It's out of warranty, I decided to open it to see what's going on.

I have a multimeter, but I am more of a software than a hardware guy and I am no good at electronics, but I've seen one Windbond chip with a white mark that is probably partially fried but more than enough to make the graphic card useless.

I am no expert in the field and I would really really appreciate your advice about what should I do, if I should try to talk with some repairs company or try to buy the chip and a heat gun and try to replace it on my own (probably a bad idea but is gonna end in the bin anyways).

I attach two pictures of the card. (Second picture shows the chip I was talking about)

Thank you very much for your help!.
 

Attachments

aigomorla

Cases and Cooling Mod PC Gaming Mod Elite Member
Super Moderator
Sep 28, 2005
19,225
1,614
126
that does not look like a fried ic... it looks like more of a dirty IC, meaning something probably residue tim has gotten on the IC.

See if alcohol will clean it up, and check for physical damage.
Usually if something is burnt you will see physical damage, or at the very least a browning around the card.

As for what you should do... well, your sort of SOL if its out of RMA and ASUS.
They really do not take care of you even under warranty so post warranty support from them is very dismal at best.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Leeea and Ranulf

Leeea

Golden Member
Apr 3, 2020
1,122
1,322
96
That win bond chip looks like a bios chip. Doubt it has anything to do with your failure.
 

Leeea

Golden Member
Apr 3, 2020
1,122
1,322
96
I was looking for some recommendations regarding my graphic card, that died all of a sudden this Monday.
Tell us how it died. Were you using it? playing a game?

Did not not start up after letting the computer sit for 3 years?

I attach two pictures of the card. (Second picture shows the chip I was talking about)
Can we get a picture of the opposite side of the board?

and if possible, try and get it all in focus. Phone cameras seem to work best.

I have a multimeter, but I am more of a software than a hardware guy and I am no good at electronics, but I've seen one Windbond chip with a white mark that is probably partially fried but more than enough to make the graphic card useless.
Take your multimeter, flip it to capacitor test mode, and test each of the capacitors. The ones that have the same numbers on the top should test similar to each other. The middle number is frequently the uf (ex: 5kw35 270 16v most likely is 270uf 16volts )

Capacitors are frequently the first thing to go, and are an easy solder fix. If not sealed properly in the factory, they can just age out on there own. In my experience, the caps fail quite a bit before system failure, so your looking for one with less then 2/3rds the value of the others.

Do not forget you have to push the point of the tip of the multimeter probe into the metal a bit to get a good reading.

---------------

there is a great guide here for testing vrms (I would just do the cold tests):
https://theforevernoob.wordpress.com/2012/05/13/how-to-test-a-motherboard-thru-their-vrms/
(also mentions how to bake the board as a last resort to somewhat re-melt the solder)

I have found testing VRMs with the board hot ends badly if your testing probe slips. I seem to slip when I push to get a good reading. I would consider skipping to "desperate measures" before doing hot testing.

---------------

Desperate measures (when you have nothing to lose):

Wash the board:
some people use the dishwasher
this guy might take a bit to seriously: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_ruNPYSIKtY
be sure to get the contacts with a brush

bake the board:
bake it to reflow the solder
 
Last edited:

ASK THE COMMUNITY