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Notre Dame Cathedral is burning to the ground as I type this

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brianmanahan

Lifer
Sep 2, 2006
20,071
2,198
126
I'm glad we got rid of pay toilets here in the U.S..
i was in boston a few years ago and had to pay at a mcdonalds

i think it was like 50 cents or a buck. or you could buy some food and be allowed to go, so i just got a burger.
 

Ackmed

Diamond Member
Oct 1, 2003
8,311
301
126
Very sad to see, and even worse when certain people are rejoicing in it. I have been only once, and it was a sight to see. Truly beautiful, and rich in history.
 

Humpy

Diamond Member
Mar 3, 2011
4,464
595
126
Maybe it's just my perspective, but the firefighters didn't appear to have a clue how to fight a fire or were they just under equipped. It looked pathetic from the videos I've seen. Esp when you compare it to videos of some of the major fires in the US and other countries.

Sad to see it go. I doubt they will be able to rebuild it as I don't think the skill set to rebuild it exist anymore.
Sad for sure, but the money will be there.

Plenty of people who know exactly how to restore it back to what it was. There will likely be some debate on whether to do that or use modern materials to restore it's appearance.

It's also interesting to envision simply leaving the ruins as they are, like an abandon castle.

I think it gets rebuilt within five years.
 

FeuerFrei

Diamond Member
Mar 30, 2005
9,152
927
126
Watching teh footage is like WW2 come to life. Seems odd the fire would start in the central spire.

As a burned out shell, rain will be problematic. Hope they find a way to shed water soon.

Hope a lot of willing souls will donate time and materials, or offer a sweet deal.
 

Amol S.

Senior member
Mar 14, 2015
518
21
81
1555502871687.png

Take a look at the first listed in Today's deals at Microsoft Store on Windows 10!!! "Dark Romance: Hunchback of Notre-Dame" for $3 off.

Probably Microsoft thought that this would be a good publicity stunt for them. XD
 

zinfamous

No Lifer
Jul 12, 2006
103,496
18,063
136
As a burned out shell, rain will be problematic. Hope they find a way to shed water soon.
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Shouldn't be that big of a deal. It was actually somewhat normal for the walls to stay up and un-roofed for decades and centuries when these things were being built because, it either took that long...or they also built a thing without having any idea how to put a roof on it. See: Santa Maria del Fiore in Florence. That one was started around the same time as Notre Dame (a few hundred years earlier, I think), and it took them about 400? years after it was already in operation to figure out how to build a dome large enough to cap it, because such technology or knowledge simply did not exist anywhere throughout that time.

I mean, it's kinda like how Italians still build everything these days, so it makes sense.

If it doesn't already have an archaic drainage system along the walls, with subtly-sloping floors throughout, then this is something that they can do
 

FeuerFrei

Diamond Member
Mar 30, 2005
9,152
927
126
Shouldn't be that big of a deal. It was actually somewhat normal for the walls to stay up and un-roofed for decades and centuries when these things were being built because, it either took that long...or they also built a thing without having any idea how to put a roof on it. See: Santa Maria del Fiore in Florence. That one was started around the same time as Notre Dame (a few hundred years earlier, I think), and it took them about 400? years after it was already in operation to figure out how to build a dome large enough to cap it, because such technology or knowledge simply did not exist anywhere throughout that time.

I mean, it's kinda like how Italians still build everything these days, so it makes sense.

If it doesn't already have an archaic drainage system along the walls, with subtly-sloping floors throughout, then this is something that they can do
I was thinking more about the furnishings and decor within, rather than the masonry.
 

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