NON_POLITICAL China Coronavirus THREAD

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Muse

Lifer
Jul 11, 2001
34,256
6,056
126
"Common knowledge" in 'murica these days is who won the last pro-wrestling championship and possibly the price of a large fries at McDonalds.
Yeah, well, TBH I don't know those things. Dang, guess I shouldn't move out of my area. Home prices are high but the proportion of well educated people isn't miniscule (Berkeley, CA).

I'm out of a medical family. My dad was the first M.D., but they are around 1/2 dozen now.
 

Torn Mind

Diamond Member
Nov 25, 2012
9,394
1,789
126
That's one of the biggest things that scares me about American healthcare. That plus the financial aspect of medical treatment. Remember this poor guy? We've had insulin available for 100 years & yet this happened:

There is another avenue that led to his death, which is mainstream dietary advice for diabetics. It is rather contradictory that if someone is in danger of spiking his blood sugars, to advise them to continue eat foods that contain a giant wad of that sugar. Even with fiber and accessory vitamins...well the chemical reactions that occur in breaking down the sugar remain intact, but somewhat obstructed by the fiber. In summary, a whole grain or beans will still provide a plentiful load of glucose that the body cannot handle. One doesn't have to go full ketogenic diet, but any iteration of a low-carb diet will be better than being ended by ketoacidosis.

In actuality, if it's vitamin deficiency one wants to avoid, taking a fucking multivitamin will do pretty much the same as a "whole grain" with zero glucose to worry about.

You have articles like this being promulgated in 2021, where 6 starches a day are being recommended.

It's great to avoid a heart attack...even by dying another way before a heart attack can strike. /sarcasm

It's a given fact that insulin inhibits fat breakdown processes. Yet experts continue to advise insulin-stimulating foods to people who need to get fat broken down.

As someone who had cooked glutinous rice flour pancakes, the flour is more durable when table sugar is NOT added to the mix; the pancakes do not burn as easily. Put sugar into that "batter", and you better watch it because it wlll burn more easily.

As a type 1, Boyle did need insulin eventually as zero carb diets are basically impossible to comply with long term. But if a crisis is looming, the crisis diet would be eating zero GI foods like eggs until the funds can be raised.

The medical industry wants diabetics to exist because many diseases are caused by the damaging potency of glucose in excess. But at the same time, insurance companies want to make their buck to. To treat those diseases requires a fair bit of coin and are a huge money maker for the industry and the practitioners who paid time and money to go to med school.

Due to the general populace's "mindsets" and lack of serious understanding of deeper concepts used in nutrition, gurus and experts usually can exploit their ignorance to sell half-truths that fixes some things but not everything. If someone doesn't take one organic chemistry class, they are set up to not really understand what is going on with dietary substances. The experts "dumb down" the concepts to the point that the general populace can be misled. One example is "natural fruit sugar". Some book I'm not aware of obviously must have concocted that term, and exploiting the naturalistic fallacy, gets people to think sugars in fruit are somehow different from the sugars in say, sugar. In actuality, whatever benefits fruits bestow is mostly because of the vitamins, minerals, other compounds first and fiber second. Those things obstruct the sugars present in fruits.
 
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pmv

Lifer
May 30, 2008
10,912
5,679
136
Personally I'm old enough to have been vaccinated against smallpox when I was a kid so from what I understand I'm still immune even if Monkey-pox somehow becomes airborne. (unlikely but possible)

Even if it is seriously undercounted I'm not all that concerned personally.

The potential issue with avian flu is that it already is airborne, already is capable of infecting humans AND is being spread everywhere by flocks of wild birds.
Fairly sure I had small-pox vaccine, but then I read that its effectiveness wears off after 3-5 years, so...
 

Captante

Lifer
Oct 20, 2003
25,995
7,341
136
Fairly sure I had small-pox vaccine, but then I read that its effectiveness wears off after 3-5 years, so...
I've also heard the opposite that immunity is life-long... I don't believe anyone is 100% sure.
 

allisolm

Elite Member
Administrator
Jan 2, 2001
24,350
2,831
136
In case anyone was thinking about heading down Florida way - 60 of our 67 counties (including the one in which I live) have been declared high risk for COVID-19 transmission. My county's positive testing was at 23% last week and we are reporting over 1000 cases a week in a county of 291,000. :(
 

K1052

Lifer
Aug 21, 2003
41,075
21,122
136
In case anyone was thinking about heading down Florida way - 60 of our 67 counties (including the one in which I live) have been declared high risk for COVID-19 transmission. My county's positive testing was at 23% last week and we are reporting over 1000 cases a week in a county of 291,000. :(
BA.5 is really rocking. Lots of people sick that I know. I'm actually going to mask on the plane back from California because I can't afford the time to get sick next week.
 
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dullard

Elite Member
May 21, 2001
24,081
2,319
126
In case anyone was thinking about heading down Florida way - 60 of our 67 counties (including the one in which I live) have been declared high risk for COVID-19 transmission. My county's positive testing was at 23% last week and we are reporting over 1000 cases a week in a county of 291,000. :(
I wouldn't put too much emphasis on case counts any more. Too many people just avoid being tested or test at home and never report the results. But, you can tell from case counts whether things are getting better or getting worse. They seem to be getting worse in many places right now. @K1052 is correct, BA.5 is just completely sweeping the nation. Even people who I personally am close to who are generally careful couldn't avoid BA.5.

Instead of case counts, the positivity rate is a somewhat decent indicator. Positivity rates do go up when people test at home. But, you can't tell if positivity rates went up because fewer people are testing or if it goes up due to more disease in the area.

The real helpful data is wastewater testing. People cannot avoid using water. There is no reasonable way to evade detection this way. Looks like Florida is just getting started on that. But there do seem to be Florida hot spots already. https://covid.cdc.gov/covid-data-tracker/#wastewater-surveillance (Scroll down to the USA map and look for orange or red).
 

balloonshark

Diamond Member
Jun 5, 2008
5,660
1,863
136
I still haven't gotten my 2nd booster. Is it worth getting against the BA.5 variant or should I wait until a new vax is approved?
 

dullard

Elite Member
May 21, 2001
24,081
2,319
126
I still haven't gotten my 2nd booster. Is it worth getting against the BA.5 variant or should I wait until a new vax is approved?
Most of the main variants have been the dominant strain for ~3 months (delta was ~6 months). If you wait for a BA.5 variant or vaccine, it will likely be over by the time you get that shot. Something else will have taken the king-of-the-hill position. Omicron related vaccines should be available Sept/Oct if everything falls in place. So, I think you have time to get the 2nd booster now and then get a booster with Omicron in it at that time. The Omicron booster will be closer to BA.5 so it might be a bit better than the original booster.

The 2nd booster won't prevent infection since it isn't targeted towards these new variants and since Covid grows so rapidly in your body before your immune system kicks in. But, it does seem like those who are fully boosted are getting a much more mild version of the disease. I think that alone is worth it.

Longer term, the FDA is going to stop requiring extensive and time-consuming efficacy tests on all new boosters (they still need to be safe). Also, universal vaccines seem to be quite promising--there are dozens in clinical or pre-clinical trials right now. Instead of targeting the spike protein that keeps mutating, the universal vaccines target conserved regions and should theoretically be effective against all known coronaviruses. The drawback is that the spike proteins that cover the outer surface are the most easily accessible for antibodies, so universal vaccines are harder to develop since they need to attack the less accessible portions of the virus. But it is possible in a year or two that we will no longer be playing catchup.
 

Geekbabe

Moderator Emeritus<br>Elite Member
Oct 16, 1999
31,989
1,964
126
www.theshoppinqueen.com
I tested positive for COVID on May 26th, I immediately got Paxlovid. Thankfully I didn’t need to be put in hospital but I am still struggling with terrible fatigue & a cough that feels like it will never go away. I am receiving home healthcare to help regain my strengt.

Covid was terrible, not sure if I would survive another round of it
 

BudAshes

Lifer
Jul 20, 2003
13,571
2,652
136
121
Somehow when I got COVID a couple months ago my wife didn't get it and now she has it and I haven't gotten it. She is getting the terrible body aches and fatigue so far. I'm working from home and she has slept most of the day.
 
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Geekbabe

Moderator Emeritus<br>Elite Member
Oct 16, 1999
31,989
1,964
126
www.theshoppinqueen.com
Somehow when I got COVID a couple months ago my wife didn't get it and now she has it and I haven't gotten it. She is getting the terrible body aches and fatigue so far. I'm working from home and she has slept most of the day.
my entire household caught it within a few days of each other. My son & husband faired the best but I am still struggling.
 

BudAshes

Lifer
Jul 20, 2003
13,571
2,652
136
121
well I guess I can look forward to kissing my arse goodbye soon then, not sure my body can stand another round of this.
Seems like symptoms do get reduced. My friends fiance just got it for the 3rd time because she works with kids. It was just basically the sniffles over a few days.
 

Captante

Lifer
Oct 20, 2003
25,995
7,341
136
There is another avenue that led to his death, which is mainstream dietary advice for diabetics.

Yeah.... those crazy MD's and scientists wtf do they know right? :rolleyes:

Pretty sure I don't need to say this but DO NOT listen to ANY medical or dietary advice from this guy he's totally out there and has no idea what he's talking about.

You might as well consult Joe Rogan or Rupert Murdoch for Covid treatment ideas!
 

Geekbabe

Moderator Emeritus<br>Elite Member
Oct 16, 1999
31,989
1,964
126
www.theshoppinqueen.com
Seems like symptoms do get reduced. My friends fiance just got it for the 3rd time because she works with kids. It was just basically the sniffles over a few days.
I am 65 yrs old dealing with lung cancer & COPD. In the past few months I have had the flu, followed shortly after by pneumonia and then Covid. I seriously doubt my next round will be “ just basically the sniffles for a few days”

I have been fighting off illness for months and am receiving home health care to help me regain strength and improve mobility. My body has given all it has to give at this point.
 

Torn Mind

Diamond Member
Nov 25, 2012
9,394
1,789
126
Yeah.... those crazy MD's and scientists wtf do they know right? :rolleyes:

Pretty sure I don't need to say this but DO NOT listen to ANY medical or dietary advice from this guy he's totally out there and has no idea what he's talking about.

You might as well consult Joe Rogan or Rupert Murdoch for Covid treatment ideas!
Hospital offered my mom boiled potatoes.

She informed them she was prediabetic.

They countered back saying she had dietary restrictions related to diarrhea.

They seemed more interested in milking a number than addressing dehydration. She remains dry mouthed to this day. 20 bags of high concentration potassium. Suffices to say the only future option is driving to any MedStar ER than going to the two local hospitals, all 15-25 miles away.


I’m sorry, but I listen to real stories. Not merely follow dogmas.
 

BudAshes

Lifer
Jul 20, 2003
13,571
2,652
136
121
I am 65 yrs old dealing with lung cancer & COPD. In the past few months I have had the flu, followed shortly after by pneumonia and then Covid. I seriously doubt my next round will be “ just basically the sniffles for a few days”

I have been fighting off illness for months and am receiving home health care to help me regain strength and improve mobility. My body has given all it has to give at this point.
Well it sounds like you are a lot tougher than you are giving yourself credit for. Most people would be long gone by now, I wouldn't bet against you.
 

Red Squirrel

No Lifer
May 24, 2003
63,510
10,129
126
twitter.com
Hopefully any other rounds of covid won't be as bad due to having more antibodies. Going to help if they can tweak the vaccine to target the newer variants as well.
 

[DHT]Osiris

Lifer
Dec 15, 2015
11,207
8,403
146
well I guess I can look forward to kissing my arse goodbye soon then, not sure my body can stand another round of this.
Well it sounds like you are a lot tougher than you are giving yourself credit for. Most people would be long gone by now, I wouldn't bet against you.
This. Remember that our species is breathtakingly resilient. Accept your limitations, but understand your capabilities. And fight, always fight. Above all else, humans are exceptional fighters.
 

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