NON_POLITICAL China Coronavirus THREAD

Page 781 - Seeking answers? Join the AnandTech community: where nearly half-a-million members share solutions and discuss the latest tech.

Muse

Lifer
Jul 11, 2001
34,282
6,074
126
How Long-COVID Risk Varies By Variant

"The Omicron variant is less likely to give you long COVID than a previous strain of the virus, British researchers say.

What was described as the first peer-reviewed report to investigate Omicron and patients' risk of persistent symptoms found 4.4% of Omicron cases resulted in long COVID. That's well below the nearly 11% associated with the Delta variant, which was the dominant strain of SARS-CoV-2 earlier in the pandemic, researchers said.

But because the Omicron variant is far more contagious than Delta, more people get infected with Omicron and, therefore, more experience long COVID, they added.

"We still need to keep providing support for people with long COVID while we try to understand why it occurs and how we can treat it," said lead researcher Claire Steves, a senior clinical lecturer at Kings College London.

Long COVID can include a variety of symptoms and last for weeks, months or, potentially, years, affecting a person's quality of life, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Sometimes the symptoms can go away or come back.

They can include fatigue, fever, malaise, trouble breathing, cough, chest pain, heart palpitations and dizziness. People can also have foggy thinking, depression, anxiety, headaches and sleep problems, as well as loss of smell and taste. Diarrhea, stomach pain, muscle ache, rash and changes in the menstrual cycle are also possible."

 
Last edited:

VashHT

Platinum Member
Feb 1, 2007
2,837
515
126
I tested positive yesterday using the at home binax test and also did a rapid and PCR test at a state run site. Rapid came back positive too and I'm sure the PCR will be positive too but haven't gotten the results yet. Been feeling sick since Saturday but didn't have any at home tests and I was hoping it was just a sinus infection.

Luckily, no one I've been around has tested positive, even my fiance has so far been testing negative so I hope she avoids it. Luckily it's been really mild for me, I'd say I feel like 95% better as of today.
 
Dec 10, 2005
22,013
4,119
126
I tested positive yesterday using the at home binax test and also did a rapid and PCR test at a state run site. Rapid came back positive too and I'm sure the PCR will be positive too but haven't gotten the results yet. Been feeling sick since Saturday but didn't have any at home tests and I was hoping it was just a sinus infection.

Luckily, no one I've been around has tested positive, even my fiance has so far been testing negative so I hope she avoids it. Luckily it's been really mild for me, I'd say I feel like 95% better as of today.
Surprised you went through with the extra tests. If you test positive on a rapid home test, it's pretty much guaranteed to be correct.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Captante

Captante

Lifer
Oct 20, 2003
26,031
7,357
136
Surprised you went through with the extra tests. If you test positive on a rapid home test, it's pretty much guaranteed to be correct.

Yep.... it's the "negatives" you can't bank on with home/rapid tests.


I didn't really want to but my fiance wanted me to for some reason, didn't really feel like fighting her on it so I just went and did it.
You're a wise man! ;)
 
  • Like
Reactions: VashHT

Kaido

Elite Member & Kitchen Overlord
Feb 14, 2004
46,681
3,677
126
  • Wow
Reactions: Captante

Captante

Lifer
Oct 20, 2003
26,031
7,357
136
Dangit


I'll keep this in mind when debating masking up prior to walking into the supermarket.... this was inevitable unfortunately.
 

Captante

Lifer
Oct 20, 2003
26,031
7,357
136
I'd still be a whole lot more concerned about avian-flu then 173 cases of Monkey-pox total (as of this morning) nationwide in the US.

(per CDC)



2022 Detections of Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza in Wild Birds

1611 confirmed detections most of which were in random flocks of wild birds many that migrate long distances. These are only the tip of the iceberg in terms of actual infection numbers and it's everywhere birds fly right now.

(per USDA ~ 6/21/22)
 

K1052

Lifer
Aug 21, 2003
41,106
21,190
136
I'd still be a whole lot more concerned about avian-flu then 173 cases of Monkey-pox total (as of this morning) nationwide in the US.

(per CDC)



2022 Detections of Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza in Wild Birds

1611 confirmed detections most of which were in random flocks of wild birds many that migrate long distances. These are only the tip of the iceberg in terms of actual infection numbers and it's everywhere birds fly right now.

(per USDA ~ 6/21/22)
I have every reason to believe that monkeypox cases are substantially undercounted due to a lack of testing. Even though it is predominantly spreading in one subgroup. Gimmie that Jynneos vaccine.
 

Captante

Lifer
Oct 20, 2003
26,031
7,357
136
I have every reason to believe that monkeypox cases are substantially undercounted due to a lack of testing. Even though it is predominantly spreading in one subgroup. Gimmie that Jynneos vaccine.

Personally I'm old enough to have been vaccinated against smallpox when I was a kid so from what I understand I'm still immune even if Monkey-pox somehow becomes airborne. (unlikely but possible)

Even if it is seriously undercounted I'm not all that concerned personally.

The potential issue with avian flu is that it already is airborne, already is capable of infecting humans AND is being spread everywhere by flocks of wild birds.
 

nakedfrog

No Lifer
Apr 3, 2001
54,846
7,585
126
Well, it's day 6 since I tested positive and I'm finally feeling mostly better. I figure I probably either got it at an outdoor concert (didn't wear a mask) or at the dentist the day before (doesn't seem super likely, since masks are required unless you're actively in the chair). I made it 2.5 years, that seems like a decent run.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Kaido and K1052

Torn Mind

Diamond Member
Nov 25, 2012
9,408
1,791
126
I'm currently very interested in micro-clots:

Looks like the treatment provider org RTHM is only available in five states and probably isn't looking for people on low-income Medicaid...

Lack of Interest Within Medical Communities “Baffling”
Khan: There doesn’t seem to be any urgency in the medical community despite the paper being published in [August] 2021. My worry is that people will get worse and worse. Also, there will be some desperate people who will self-medicate. In fact, I am aware that that is [already] happening, and that is very concerning.

This is a global public health emergency. We cannot wait a year or two years for a huge multicenter study. What we need is, as Dr. Curtin says, small agile studies where you can replicate the findings, trial the treatments, and then make them accessible to people.


This needs to be the No. 1 priority—but it isn’t, which is baffling.
Not really surprising to me. The "industry" isn't all that into saving people.
 

Kaido

Elite Member & Kitchen Overlord
Feb 14, 2004
46,681
3,677
126
Not really surprising to me. The "industry" isn't all that into saving people.
Learning the true nature of the medical community & our responsibility within it is truly an eye-opening experience. I've dealt with health issues for most of my life & I've learned a few things from it:

1. The medical community is a business
2. Doctors aren't paid to care
3. We have to become our own health advocates

It took me over 30 years to get to the point now where I've got most of my personal health issues identified & treated or managed. Basic stuff that I've had lifelong battles with that should have been figured out decades ago only recently got identified (mostly by me, through my persistent but slow research, because I felt like crap all the time haha), like my hereditary sleep apnea. There's not a single situation that humans touch that we don't warp somehow lol:

https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2021-07-06/when-lifesaving-vaccines-become-profit-machines-for-drugmakers
 
  • Like
Reactions: Captante

Captante

Lifer
Oct 20, 2003
26,031
7,357
136
Learning the true nature of the medical community & our responsibility within it is truly an eye-opening experience.

This is why the only thing a medical degree gets done with me is to get a doc's foot in the door.... competency/knowledge obviously matters but at least equally important are communication and empathy.

Without #'s 2 & 3 on that list, number one becomes largely irrelevant. (if a doc doesn't listen/care you may never get the treatment you need)
 

Muse

Lifer
Jul 11, 2001
34,282
6,074
126
This link should work for 14 days:

Updated Covid Shots Are Coming. Will They Be Too Late?
The government has greenlit new vaccines to defend against the latest Omicron variants. But the shots won’t arrive until the fall, and cases are rising now.

 

K1052

Lifer
Aug 21, 2003
41,106
21,190
136
This link should work for 14 days:

Updated Covid Shots Are Coming. Will They Be Too Late?
The government has greenlit new vaccines to defend against the latest Omicron variants. But the shots won’t arrive until the fall, and cases are rising now.


This part is F'ing stupid and a highly irresponsible reason not to act. We reformulate the flu vaccine annually but just don't tell people about it. That's the paradigm for COVID. It is not like multivalent vaccines are new or something either.

Others have expressed concern that reformulating vaccines would undercut confidence in the vaccination program.
The FDA seems to be trending in the correct direction though and updating the shots without requiring lots of human testing.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Ajay

Kaido

Elite Member & Kitchen Overlord
Feb 14, 2004
46,681
3,677
126
if a doc doesn't listen/care you may never get the treatment you need
That's one of the biggest things that scares me about American healthcare. That plus the financial aspect of medical treatment. Remember this poor guy? We've had insulin available for 100 years & yet this happened:

 
  • Like
Reactions: Captante

Captante

Lifer
Oct 20, 2003
26,031
7,357
136
That's one of the biggest things that scares me about American healthcare. That plus the financial aspect of medical treatment. Remember this poor guy? We've had insulin available for 100 years & yet this happened:

Drug companies raising prices and/or stopping production of cheap effective drugs to prioritize expensive ones needs to be made illegal.
 

Torn Mind

Diamond Member
Nov 25, 2012
9,408
1,791
126
Learning the true nature of the medical community & our responsibility within it is truly an eye-opening experience. I've dealt with health issues for most of my life & I've learned a few things from it:

1. The medical community is a business
2. Doctors aren't paid to care
3. We have to become our own health advocates

It took me over 30 years to get to the point now where I've got most of my personal health issues identified & treated or managed. Basic stuff that I've had lifelong battles with that should have been figured out decades ago only recently got identified (mostly by me, through my persistent but slow research, because I felt like crap all the time haha), like my hereditary sleep apnea. There's not a single situation that humans touch that we don't warp somehow lol:

https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2021-07-06/when-lifesaving-vaccines-become-profit-machines-for-drugmakers
Potassium is the quite often the grim reaper for many...

Hospitals love overdoing the IVs of potassium, causing the patient to enter is weakened, morbid state, which then can be used coerce the next of kin to consenting to hospice and morphine. They conduct themselves differently when being watched compared to left alone. My mother stayed with my grandmother until grandmother's bloodwork was normal. Then mom goes home to sleep the night and the hospital "manufactured" a crisis because they put four more bags overnight. This also helped cement a virulent contempt towards basically any Indian(from Asia). For me, no "racism" on my part but I do view medical pros in the lens of people who care more about one of the following: coin, saving the "world" on for Malthusian reasons, or even as simply as mundane just to clear out a bed. Those who say it was time don't get it. It's not time until the time actually comes without your fucking assistance. Anyone who utters those words will be treated as no better than vermin like mice or pests; bitches who are deserving of elimination sooner rather than later.



That was 12 years ago.

Just this week, I took my mom to the ER for dehyradtion. For the time I was there, they gave her the sodium chloride saline and at the end of the time in the ER and then being admitted as an inpatient, they stated her blood potassium was low.

She called me yesterday and told me of the "cadence" since being admitted. She was still having diarrhea to colitis but they have been giving any sodium chloride bags but I believe 12 bags total of potassium solution. They are having her consume liquids but its all coming out, thus resulting in the low potassium.

Heck, just yesterday after returning from the ER, I had the inkling to search for my mom's friend's son on Google after seeing some celebrity passing on HFBoards(something related to California). The son's obituary(he died at 58 last October) stated that the mother of the son, who is the friend of my mom, is still alive at 89, even though she was starting to lose the capacity to manage things the last time they had contact in 2005 or something(her houses in PG and near Annapolis were sold and she moved to I believe Napa, California with her now-deceased son).
 

Muse

Lifer
Jul 11, 2001
34,282
6,074
126
This part is F'ing stupid and a highly irresponsible reason not to act. We reformulate the flu vaccine annually but just don't tell people about it. That's the paradigm for COVID. It is not like multivalent vaccines are new or something either.

The FDA seems to be trending in the correct direction though and updating the shots without requiring lots of human testing.
I thought it was very common knowledge that they formulate each year's flu vaccine based on best guess what strain(s) out there (at the time they are designing the shot) will be most problematic.
 
Last edited:

Captante

Lifer
Oct 20, 2003
26,031
7,357
136
I thought it was very common knowledge that they formulate each year's flu vaccine based on best guess what strain(s) out there will be most problematic.

"Common knowledge" in 'murica these days is who won the last pro-wrestling championship and possibly the price of a large fries at McDonalds.
 
  • Wow
  • Haha
Reactions: Kaido and Muse

ASK THE COMMUNITY