NON_POLITICAL China Coronavirus THREAD

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K1052

Lifer
Aug 21, 2003
40,623
19,690
136
There was talk after 2nd booster for mRNA vaccines were approved that another (i.3. 3rd) booster might be coming in the fall. I think I heard talk that that booster would (might) be tweaked for new variants, whereas the others were just the original shot (although Moderna's boosters were 1/2 dose). Have there been further developments?
There will probably be an omicron specific and/or bivalent (OG strain and Omicron) vaccine boost available in the fall.
 
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allisolm

Elite Member
Administrator
Jan 2, 2001
24,287
2,669
136
Is there a shelf life for tests? I have the originals sitting in a drawer.
They all have expiration dates on the box, but those dates for many of them have been extended. See link below for the list of approved tests and their shelf life.

 
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Muse

Lifer
Jul 11, 2001
33,929
5,688
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There will probably be an omicron specific and/or bivalent (OG strain and Omicron) vaccine boost available in the fall.
Meantime I'm getting a little nervous. My 2nd Moderna booster was 2.5 months ago, they say immunity is waning after 2 months, at least from the first booster and I suppose since the second. Also, positivity rates have been going up around here (SF Bay Area).
 

K1052

Lifer
Aug 21, 2003
40,623
19,690
136
Meantime I'm getting a little nervous. My 2nd Moderna booster was 2.5 months ago, they say immunity is waning after 2 months, at least from the first booster and I suppose since the second. Also, positivity rates have been going up around here (SF Bay Area).
Antibody levels will always decline but that is just one component of immunity.
 
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dullard

Elite Member
May 21, 2001
24,047
2,263
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Antibody levels will always decline but that is just one component of immunity.
The problem with Covid is that it progresses so fast. Your other components of immunity, such as B cells and T cells take about a week to ramp up. By the time they are ready, you are already sick and may actually be recovering from Covid. Antibodies are the most realistic thing that we have that is fast enough to fight Covid.

Of course if you keep your initial dose low, then that might give you enough time. Since the viral particles grow exponentially, an initial dose of 1000 viruses will take far longer than an initial dose of 10,000 viruses to ramp up. Thus if you can keep your exposure small (not lingering around people for long, mask wearing, etc), you might have time for the rest of your immune system to ramp up.
 

K1052

Lifer
Aug 21, 2003
40,623
19,690
136
The problem with Covid is that it progresses so fast. Your other components of immunity, such as B cells and T cells take about a week to ramp up. By the time they are ready, you are already sick and may actually be recovering from Covid. Antibodies are the most realistic thing that we have that is fast enough to fight Covid.

Of course if you keep your initial dose low, then that might give you enough time. Since the viral particles grow exponentially, an initial dose of 1000 viruses will take far longer than an initial dose of 10,000 viruses to ramp up. Thus if you can keep your exposure small (not lingering around people for long, mask wearing, etc), you might have time for the rest of your immune system to ramp up.
Considering how infectious the variants are I doubt anything short of mucosal immunity is really going to do the job anymore to fully prevent infections. Maybe in a year or two they'll have a nasal vaccine that works for that. In the meantime I'd just like the smallest chance of severe illness and death that I can obtain from the existing platform.
 
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Muse

Lifer
Jul 11, 2001
33,929
5,688
126
The problem with Covid is that it progresses so fast. Your other components of immunity, such as B cells and T cells take about a week to ramp up. By the time they are ready, you are already sick and may actually be recovering from Covid. Antibodies are the most realistic thing that we have that is fast enough to fight Covid.

Of course if you keep your initial dose low, then that might give you enough time. Since the viral particles grow exponentially, an initial dose of 1000 viruses will take far longer than an initial dose of 10,000 viruses to ramp up. Thus if you can keep your exposure small (not lingering around people for long, mask wearing, etc), you might have time for the rest of your immune system to ramp up.
I had a conversation with a person I work with today about these very things. Neither of us is aware of having caught covid but I said we might have but were asymptomatic, and she agreed. Then I mentioned that an important factor in not being symptomatic or really sick is limiting the extent of your exposure, getting a small viral dose, and she agreed. I only wear N95's, had them before the pandemic and have bought some more recently. I've been pretty careful, but wonder and figure I could catch it because I'm nowhere near as careful as I was before being vaccinated, which was nearing paranoia, largely because I was pretty unclear on the epidemiology on many levels, including the means of transmission. Also, my lifestyle made it possible to make it just about impossible to get exposed, thanks to a neighbor who offered to do all my grocery shopping. :p I even asked her 2 years ago to get my car smogged, I was that nervous. I personally went to the same shop a couple weeks ago and had it smogged again.

I saw on TV tonight that Fauci has tested positive !!! :oops:
 
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Muse

Lifer
Jul 11, 2001
33,929
5,688
126
Considering how infectious the variants are I doubt anything short of mucosal immunity is really going to do the job anymore to fully prevent infections. Maybe in a year or two they'll have a nasal vaccine that works for that. In the meantime I'd just like the smallest chance of severe illness and death that I can obtain from the existing platform.
Saw Dr. Monica Ghandi on TV tonight, infectious disease expert M.D. at UC San Francisco, and she said that to prevent minor covid infections (IIRC) a nasal vaccine is what's needed. I have no idea why that would be.
 

Torn Mind

Diamond Member
Nov 25, 2012
8,970
1,657
126
I had a conversation with a person I work with today about these very things. Neither of us is aware of having caught covid but I said we might have but were asymptomatic, and she agreed. Then I mentioned that an important factor in not being symptomatic or really sick is limiting the extent of your exposure, getting a small viral dose, and she agreed. I only wear N95's, had them before the pandemic and have bought some more recently. I've been pretty careful, but wonder and figure I could catch it because I'm nowhere near as careful as I was before being vaccinated, which was nearing paranoia, largely because I was pretty unclear on the epidemiology on many levels, including the means of transmission. Also, my lifestyle made it possible to make it just about impossible to get exposed, thanks to a neighbor who offered to do all my grocery shopping. :p I even asked her 2 years ago to get my car smogged, I was that nervous. I personally went to the same shop a couple weeks ago and had it smogged again.

I saw on TV tonight that Fauci has tested positive !!! :oops:
Well, $219 can get you confirmation of T-cell memory. They jacked up the price because I swear I remember it being $150.


Asymptomatic or having "anesthesia" of symptoms during infection is key to spreading the virus.

My first confirmed go-around(and probable second infection) had me reporting "asymptomatic" but I was actually symptomatic but sedated/anesthetized by the virus. So I reported fatigue and chest discomfort, but I had nothing in the respiratory tract. I become "symptomatic" after the virus was cleared. So, all the time I was coughing...the virus was already apparently done for weeks, as I tested negative.

My suspected "first go around" in late November 2020 was basically laying down for two weeks and then feeling strangely "lacking" in stamina for a few months.

People who might be completely "asymptomatic" might actually be getting only the anesthetic effect, and might even have had a few "good days" due to the virus suppressing pain nerves.

However, because medicine doesn't consider "positive" effects as necessary to monitor during an infection, there is no study of just how the asymptomatic really felt during their infection.
 

dullard

Elite Member
May 21, 2001
24,047
2,263
126
I had a conversation with a person I work with today about these very things. Neither of us is aware of having caught covid but I said we might have but were asymptomatic, and she agreed. Then I mentioned that an important factor in not being symptomatic or really sick is limiting the extent of your exposure, getting a small viral dose, and she agreed. I only wear N95's, had them before the pandemic and have bought some more recently. I've been pretty careful, but wonder and figure I could catch it because I'm nowhere near as careful as I was before being vaccinated, which was nearing paranoia, largely because I was pretty unclear on the epidemiology on many levels, including the means of transmission. Also, my lifestyle made it possible to make it just about impossible to get exposed, thanks to a neighbor who offered to do all my grocery shopping. :p I even asked her 2 years ago to get my car smogged, I was that nervous. I personally went to the same shop a couple weeks ago and had it smogged again.

I saw on TV tonight that Fauci has tested positive !!! :oops:
It is important to be careful. But there is also a possibility of being too careful. Not only does that impact your life, but also it prevents you from tiny micro doses of the disease. There is a theory that having regular very small exposures is another way of staying boosted. There is also initial evidence pointing that the theory might be correct. Of course, that is dangerous since it is possible to accidentally get a large exposure that way. But, a quick trip to a store now and then with a properly worn N95 mask on is probably better for you at preventing Covid than staying fully isolated.

I also don't think smogging will do anything other than putting your mind at ease. Opening the car windows/doors for a couple hours will do you more good.
 

nakedfrog

No Lifer
Apr 3, 2001
54,571
7,227
126
It is important to be careful. But there is also a possibility of being too careful. Not only does that impact your life, but also it prevents you from tiny micro doses of the disease. There is a theory that having regular very small exposures is another way of staying boosted. There is also initial evidence pointing that the theory might be correct. Of course, that is dangerous since it is possible to accidentally get a large exposure that way. But, a quick trip to a store now and then with a properly worn N95 mask on is probably better for you at preventing Covid than staying fully isolated.

I also don't think smogging will do anything other than putting your mind at ease. Opening the car windows/doors for a couple hours will do you more good.
I think he might just be referring to taking it in to get the annual CA smog check.
 

Muse

Lifer
Jul 11, 2001
33,929
5,688
126
It is important to be careful. But there is also a possibility of being too careful. Not only does that impact your life, but also it prevents you from tiny micro doses of the disease. There is a theory that having regular very small exposures is another way of staying boosted. There is also initial evidence pointing that the theory might be correct. Of course, that is dangerous since it is possible to accidentally get a large exposure that way. But, a quick trip to a store now and then with a properly worn N95 mask on is probably better for you at preventing Covid than staying fully isolated.

I also don't think smogging will do anything other than putting your mind at ease. Opening the car windows/doors for a couple hours will do you more good.
I only smogged because California made me.

Yeah, micro-dosing. I intuited that, didn't see anything or anyone suggesting that but it's kind of a no brainer. Once vaccinated, getting small doses, particularly of strains that don't dive into your lungs like the initial and the delta variants, would seem to boost your immunity as long as you don't get a big dose, and I've been quite careful with my N95s and all. I haven't seen my family since before the pandemic, save for an outdoor with my sister and some of her friends, another outdoor with 2 others and another outdoor a couple months ago with 3 family folks. I shop at Costco, Trader Joe's and local indy supermarket with N95 on and I keep my social distance when possible, am not sweating it... all since vaxxed. I'm at risk by age but I think I'm in relatively good health. Maybe it's a sign too that I had rather mild reactions to all 4 Moderna shots, maybe that means I'm a tougher target than most. I know a guy 20 years younger than me who told me last week that the 3 Moderna shots he got all whacked him out for a week!
 

Brovane

Diamond Member
Dec 18, 2001
4,419
400
126
Saw Dr. Monica Ghandi on TV tonight, infectious disease expert M.D. at UC San Francisco, and she said that to prevent minor covid infections (IIRC) a nasal vaccine is what's needed. I have no idea why that would be.
COVID is a mucosal virus and a vaccine that gives mucosal immunity will be able to neutralize incoming viral particles. The current vaccines do not give you mucosal immunity. However when the virus starts to spread beyond your nasal passages etc. then the current vaccine will help prevent a more serious case of COVID. A nasal based vaccine in theory would give you mucosal immunity which would stop a COVID-19 infection earlier in theory.
 

Kaido

Elite Member & Kitchen Overlord
Feb 14, 2004
46,604
3,612
126
On a tangent, just talked to a friend who has been WFH for the past 2.5 years. Hard to believe it's been that long! Literally just been alone, by herself, in her apartment for over 2 years. Has health issues, so doesn't go out to reduce the risk of getting COVID for her immune system. Boggles my mind. Zoom meetings just aren't the same as human interation!
 

Captante

Lifer
Oct 20, 2003
24,960
6,600
136
On a tangent, just talked to a friend who has been WFH for the past 2.5 years. Hard to believe it's been that long! Literally just been alone, by herself, in her apartment for over 2 years. Has health issues, so doesn't go out to reduce the risk of getting COVID for her immune system. Boggles my mind. Zoom meetings just aren't the same as human interation!

Wow .... even I will venture outside occasionally! :oops: ;)

I did a whole lot of sitting at home by myself the last 1.5 years too and I have to say my social-skills (such as they are lol) have eroded a bit as has my peace of mind ... being completely alone (aside from video) all the time isn't healthy you are quite correct!
 
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quikah

Diamond Member
Apr 7, 2003
3,707
416
126
Wow .... even I will venture outside occasionally! :oops: ;)

I did a whole lot of sitting at home by myself the last 1.5 years too and I have to say my social-skills (such as they are lol) have eroded a bit as has my peace of mind ... being completely alone (aside from video) all the time isn't healthy you are quite correct!
At this point it is obvious we are never going to take the steps needed to make this go away. Unless you want to move to China you are going to have to learn to live with it. Take what precautions you feel you need, but there is no point in hiding away at home anymore.
 

Captante

Lifer
Oct 20, 2003
24,960
6,600
136
Oh no doubt about it and I have been getting out more plus working quite a bit more (although still mostly from home) however stagnation did take a toll and it will be awhile yet wearing off.

Fact is that even during the best of times I'm not exactly a "social-butterfly" ROTFL.... can't blame it all on Covid however tempting that might be!

:p
 
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