NON_POLITICAL China Coronavirus THREAD

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Spacehead

Lifer
Jun 2, 2002
12,906
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How to reconcile these two claims?

(Since the start, everything about this pandemic has been confusing for a layperson)




The NBC article doesn't explicitly say the people being hospitalized have the Omicron variant. Do we know which variant they have?
Trying to be optimistic here, if i can about such things.
 

njdevilsfan87

Platinum Member
Apr 19, 2007
2,274
219
106
How to reconcile these two claims?

(Since the start, everything about this pandemic has been confusing for a layperson)
The uncertainty could be a good thing. Because if this were truly bad, I think it would be a little more obvious by now, given they have found community cases not linked to travel. That would suggest omicron has been around for at least a month now. And while the proportion of children being admitted is a little concerning, it could also be explained a potentially very positive development: it's no longer adults hard. And so if that's the case, the proportion of children being admitted will go up just by less adults being admitted. So let's hope this is the case, because if it is it could be the beginning of the end of the pandemic. Either way, we should know by Christmas where this is going.

I feel like the reaction to Delta was a little different, given the situation in India was bad. There was never this sense of, "it's not that bad over here (in India)". It was bad and I don't think we even knew it was due to a new variant over there for a little while too. But maybe I'm just remembering things differently and/or numbed to all of the news at this point. I'm still getting boosted, because Delta will be floating around for a while still.
 
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Captante

Lifer
Oct 20, 2003
23,076
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I don't think we will know how things will go with Omicron for at least a few more weeks.

Until then even the "experts" are at least partially guessing but considering the number of unvaccinated walking around certain areas of the US I'm not optimistic.

My gut is telling me that any "surge" in cases will happen right around Christmas, right when those folks are traveling & getting together.

Just freaking terrific. :rolleyes:

 
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pmv

Lifer
May 30, 2008
10,223
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I do not understand the logic behind the government's new post-OmiGod-variant rules. Seems you only have to wear masks where commerce is occuring and money is changing hands. If there's no commerce going on, the virus doesn't infect people, apparently. The rules even explicitly say masks are required in museum gift shops, but not in the rest of the museum. I do NOT get the logic of that. It seems close to an explicit declaration that money trumps science.
 
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Dec 10, 2005
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I do not understand the logic behind the government's new post-OmiGod-variant rules. Seems you only have to wear masks where commerce is occuring and money is changing hands. If there's no commerce going on, the virus doesn't infect people, apparently. The rules even explicitly say masks are required in museum gift shops, but not in the rest of the museum. I do NOT get the logic of that. It seems close to an explicit declaration that money trumps science.
The UK rules seem to be changing by the day, which is making it frustrating for an upcoming trip I have. And what you pointed out is kind of ridiculous - just make the rule simple to follow: inside = mask, unless eating/drinking in a designated eatery.

First, they changed Day ≤2 test for vaccinated travelers from antigen or PCR to PCR only - kind of annoying, because it's an additional expense, and we didn't want to lose too much time, so paid for same-day results; today, they also added a pre-departure test requirement for ≤2 days before traveling to UK, which just adds another logistical headache given the hodgepodge testing apparatus in the US and extremely variable and unreliable testing turnaround times. It's all fine, but just annoying to have new roadblocks thrown down so quickly. They'd probably be better served if they just banned unvaccinated travelers.
 

pmv

Lifer
May 30, 2008
10,223
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The UK rules seem to be changing by the day, which is making it frustrating for an upcoming trip I have. And what you pointed out is kind of ridiculous - just make the rule simple to follow: inside = mask, unless eating/drinking in a designated eatery.

First, they changed Day ≤2 test for vaccinated travelers from antigen or PCR to PCR only - kind of annoying, because it's an additional expense, and we didn't want to lose too much time, so paid for same-day results; today, they also added a pre-departure test requirement for ≤2 days before traveling to UK, which just adds another logistical headache given the hodgepodge testing apparatus in the US and extremely variable and unreliable testing turnaround times. It's all fine, but just annoying to have new roadblocks thrown down so quickly. They'd probably be better served if they just banned unvaccinated travelers.

Yeah, I noticed they just announced different rules for testing travellers. Not sure if the 'test day before you travel' replaces the 'test within 2 days of getting here' or if it is in addition to it. I believe they are fussy that you use "approved" testing providers as well.

Also I think the US wants you to test the day before departure on the way back as well, so that's a lot of tests to pay for overall.
 
Dec 10, 2005
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Yeah, I noticed they just announced different rules for testing travellers. Not sure if the 'test day before you travel' replaces the 'test within 2 days of getting here' or if it is in addition to it. I believe they are fussy that you use "approved" testing providers as well.

Also I think the US wants you to test the day before departure on the way back as well, so that's a lot of tests to pay for overall.
Yeah. The UK test before travel is new and supplements the day 2 post arrival test.

At least the US return test can use a cheaper antigen test.
 

Spacehead

Lifer
Jun 2, 2002
12,906
9,309
136
Out of curiosity, why does a such a small needle leave you feeling like you got punched in the shoulder?
I typically get a sore shoulder from the flu shot, but not this year. No soreness at all.
Got my covid booster today & have a mildly sore shoulder.

Is it dependent on the person giving the shot?
 

zinfamous

No Lifer
Jul 12, 2006
107,580
23,494
146
Which is part of the whole tyranny. It's insane that people can be charged for stuff like that. It's basically a flu and half the time you don't even know that you have it.
again, stop being wrong. This is a fuckling lie.

You are lying and you don't care. You have absolutely no idea what you are talking about. Fuck off with this sociopathic horseshit.
 

ponyo

Lifer
Feb 14, 2002
19,687
2,792
126
The UK rules seem to be changing by the day, which is making it frustrating for an upcoming trip I have. And what you pointed out is kind of ridiculous - just make the rule simple to follow: inside = mask, unless eating/drinking in a designated eatery.

First, they changed Day ≤2 test for vaccinated travelers from antigen or PCR to PCR only - kind of annoying, because it's an additional expense, and we didn't want to lose too much time, so paid for same-day results; today, they also added a pre-departure test requirement for ≤2 days before traveling to UK, which just adds another logistical headache given the hodgepodge testing apparatus in the US and extremely variable and unreliable testing turnaround times. It's all fine, but just annoying to have new roadblocks thrown down so quickly. They'd probably be better served if they just banned unvaccinated travelers.
Check and see if UK accepts Abbott Lab ID NOW PCR test. You can get the results back from that test as little as an hour. My wife and I did the ID NOW PCR test at Walgreens Drive-through for our last South Korea trip, and we got back our results the same day that evening. But Walgreens test slots fill up fast so you have to schedule ahead if you plan to take the ID NOW PCR test.
 

pmv

Lifer
May 30, 2008
10,223
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Yeah. The UK test before travel is new and supplements the day 2 post arrival test.

At least the US return test can use a cheaper antigen test.

Really not a great time to be traveling here. I don't envy you. Then again, it's not a great time to be _living_ here, with this spectacularly inept government. They weaponise incompetence. A government of none of the talents.
 
Dec 10, 2005
21,801
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Check and see if UK accepts Abbott Lab ID NOW PCR test. You can get the results back from that test as little as an hour. My wife and I did the ID NOW PCR test at Walgreens Drive-through for our last South Korea trip, and we got back our results the same day that evening. But Walgreens test slots fill up fast so you have to schedule ahead if you plan to take the ID NOW PCR test.
I think that test is accepted, but Walgreens doesn't have any of that one in MA. I'd have to drive to Maine. I think I'll be fine though: some of the other antigen tests meet sensitivity and specificity requirements. And there are some other options to explore in MA. Most places won't schedule a test more than 2 weeks out.

Really not a great time to be traveling here. I don't envy you. Then again, it's not a great time to be _living_ here, with this spectacularly inept government. They weaponise incompetence. A government of none of the talents.
At the rate everything is going in many countries, I feel like we might be in this for the longer haul. And living in the US, I can't say we've done much better. We've put this trip off a few times now, and with vaccines, I'm feeling okay about going. Plus, I have a relative who lives in the UK who's getting older and can't travel overseas much, so it could be one of the last time I realistically get to see her in person.
 
Dec 10, 2005
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I think that test is accepted, but Walgreens doesn't have any of that one in MA. I'd have to drive to Maine. I think I'll be fine though: some of the other antigen tests meet sensitivity and specificity requirements. And there are some other options to explore in MA. Most places won't schedule a test more than 2 weeks out.
Turns out it was my lucky day - a CVS in Boston has drive-through rapid PCR testing for free. Was able to get an appointment for myself the day before we depart.

Just thinking how much better we would be if we had extremely cheap, easy to access wide-spread rapid testing. Instead, we have a hodgepodge of testing methodologies and payments required/not required, and turnaround times ranging from hours to (frankly useless) days.
 
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Geekbabe

Moderator Emeritus<br>Elite Member
Oct 16, 1999
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www.theshoppinqueen.com
Out of curiosity, why does a such a small needle leave you feeling like you got punched in the shoulder?
I typically get a sore shoulder from the flu shot, but not this year. No soreness at all.
Got my covid booster today & have a mildly sore shoulder.

Is it dependent on the person giving the shot?
For a Covid vaccine they inject intramuscular…I think that causes the soreness
 

Captante

Lifer
Oct 20, 2003
23,076
5,139
136
Out of curiosity, why does a such a small needle leave you feeling like you got punched in the shoulder?
I typically get a sore shoulder from the flu shot, but not this year. No soreness at all.
Got my covid booster today & have a mildly sore shoulder.

Is it dependent on the person giving the shot?

Jamming it in there certainly hurts more then being careful does (obviously) but I think the arm-soreness is a result of some ingredient in the vaccine itself causing irritation.

I've had many shots in my arms over the years and most only hurt for 30 seconds up to a few hours not several days! (maybe the microchips getting stuck? ;) )

For shot #2 back in May I lucked out with "Nurse Ratched" who jammed that needle into my shoulder like she was hammering in a nail and yes it made for a bigger bump although all 3 Moderna's (had a booster) caused some local pain.
 
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Commodus

Diamond Member
Oct 9, 2004
8,806
6,089
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Out of curiosity, why does a such a small needle leave you feeling like you got punched in the shoulder?
I typically get a sore shoulder from the flu shot, but not this year. No soreness at all.
Got my covid booster today & have a mildly sore shoulder.

Is it dependent on the person giving the shot?
On top of what Geekbabe suggested, I'd add that it likely depends on the needle and the particular injection. My first dose was so seamless I almost wouldn't have known the nurse injected me; the second time wasn't terrible, but I definitely noticed it.
 
Dec 10, 2005
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For shot #2 back in May I lucked out with "Nurse Ratched" who jammed that needle into my shoulder like she was hammering in a nail and yes it made for a bigger bump although all 3 Moderna's (had a booster) caused some local pain.
I had that experience with a flu shot many years ago in a chain pharmacy. Pharmacist pushed the needle too deep on the first try and then had to stick it again.
 
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Dec 10, 2005
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For a Covid vaccine they inject intramuscular…I think that causes the soreness
That's part of it. There is also just the body's inflammatory response - recruitment of immune cells and inflammation at the injection site as your body enters its "holy shit, I thought we got rid of this" phase.
 
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MrSquished

Lifer
Jan 14, 2013
14,325
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Preliminary omicron info does seem to imply that the symptoms are mostly mild. We do need more time but that could mean it goes towards the way of the flu or a really bad cold sooner than later. I'm going to be optimistic not pessimistic.

I'm boosted and not that worried about being out and about this holiday season in NY. Mask up in mass transit and a few other places but otherwise not really.

Neither were the many people having a great time in Gramercy park restaurants and bars I was at last night.
 

ponyo

Lifer
Feb 14, 2002
19,687
2,792
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Turns out it was my lucky day - a CVS in Boston has drive-through rapid PCR testing for free. Was able to get an appointment for myself the day before we depart.

Just thinking how much better we would be if we had extremely cheap, easy to access wide-spread rapid testing. Instead, we have a hodgepodge of testing methodologies and payments required/not required, and turnaround times ranging from hours to (frankly useless) days.
I actually think US has one of the best widely available easy testing of any country. There are plenty of CVS, Walgreens, and Urgent Care locations to take the tests. And most tests are free for users since it's covered by health insurance and if the person is uninsured, it's paid for by the US government. We have a problem with slow test results when the labs get slammed but that happens in other countries too.

In most countries, you have to pay to get covid test and it can be real hassle to get tested for travel. Getting covid test to fly back to the US from South Korea was far greater hassle and annoying than any test in the US. And I had to pay like $80 per person for simple antigen test in South Korea vs $0 for PCR test in the US.
 
Dec 10, 2005
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I actually think US has one of the best widely available easy testing of any country. There are plenty of CVS, Walgreens, and Urgent Care locations to take the tests. And most tests are free for users since it's covered by health insurance and if the person is uninsured, it's paid for by the US government. We have a problem with slow test results when the labs get slammed but that happens in other countries too.

In most countries, you have to pay to get covid test and it can be real hassle to get tested for travel. Getting covid test to fly back to the US from South Korea was far greater hassle and annoying than any test in the US. And I had to pay like $80 per person for simple antigen test in South Korea vs $0 in the US.
I'd say there are free tests available, but I'm some venues, it's not free if you say you're just getting one for travel, and then they cost like $100-$200 (unless you want to fib on the rationale during the prescreening surveys). And some of the turnarounds are ridiculous (avg 1-2 days, but often from receipt of sample at lab, and that's only an average). So maybe in comparison, it is better, but lots of room for improvement.

The costs are somewhat exorbitant though abroad. Same day results PCR test in the UK is like $100+ for travelers requiring their day 2 test. We booked one of those because it was worth not losing an extra day waiting for results.

Anyway, my point is that it could be so much better.
 

Captante

Lifer
Oct 20, 2003
23,076
5,139
136
It depends on where you are frankly. (a recurring theme with Covid)

If I wanted a test asap (or a booster) I could have it done at several locations near me within 2-3 hours and this is on a Sunday afternoon I just looked now.

However some folks in the US have been getting charged for tests and/or having trouble getting one promptly ... in some cases quite a bit! Its the exception not the rule but sadly it has been happening.
 

Red Squirrel

No Lifer
May 24, 2003
62,669
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twitter.com
again, stop being wrong. This is a fuckling lie.

You are lying and you don't care. You have absolutely no idea what you are talking about. Fuck off with this sociopathic horseshit.
So you're saying the vaccine does not work? If you get it when you're vaccinated it's not any worse than a flu and that's assuming you even get symptoms. I'm vaccinated, and I'm not afraid of anyone who is not because I know I'm protected anyway. It's the whole point of the vaccine. We were promised all this would be over once the vaccine is out and now they keep moving the goal posts. If there is anyone lying it's the government.

As a side note it's crazy how this whole covid thing has made people like you so hostile and how it has turned people against each other. I see this everywhere and it's exactly what the government wants. Nobody is going to fight the tyranny when they are fighting each other. There is only a small percentage of people starting to see the light, including some medical professionals, but since they go against the narrative they end up losing their license for it. It's a crazy world we live in now.
 
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