NON_POLITICAL China Coronavirus THREAD

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Zorba

Lifer
Oct 22, 1999
11,679
6,119
136
Got my Booster Thursday, Moderna. Took Tylenol every 4 hours for the first 16 or so hours, had a little bit of chills and aches Thursday night, but only enough to wake me up once for about 15 minutes. Friday and today I was just slightly tired feeling.

All the kind of things if it happened from a random virus I probably wouldn't even think about it. Flu shot did more to my shoulder than the booster did.
 
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njdevilsfan87

Platinum Member
Apr 19, 2007
2,274
219
106
About a week ago I posted considering waiting to get boosted until my 2 year old can also be vaccinated. And then the universe decided to remind me of why that is a bad idea: day 6 of something (strep and covid pcr both negative) that has caused me to lose my voice and potentially cancel Thanksgiving given how close it is - we are getting our boosters after this clears up.

Does anybody know what the criteria are for getting a vaccine if you're sick with something else? Everything I'm looking up talks of waiting ~10 days after having any symptoms of COVID-19. I'm just going to assume it's the same for illnesses.
 

local

Golden Member
Jun 28, 2011
1,844
495
136
About a week ago I posted considering waiting to get boosted until my 2 year old can also be vaccinated. And then the universe decided to remind me of why that is a bad idea: day 6 of something (strep and covid pcr both negative) that has caused me to lose my voice and potentially cancel Thanksgiving given how close it is - we are getting our boosters after this clears up.

Does anybody know what the criteria are for getting a vaccine if you're sick with something else? Everything I'm looking up talks of waiting ~10 days after having any symptoms of COVID-19. I'm just going to assume it's the same for illnesses.
I am also on day 6 of some kind of cold type thing, negative PCR last week. It has kicked my ass though. I delayed getting my booster last Friday because I didn't think it would be wise to overload my system. Not that it might make the booster less effective but that it might let something else set it while fighting too many things like pneumonia or strep. I am rescheduled for the 29th to get the booster the Pfizer trial people didn't even blink when I told them my reasoning.
 
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Muse

Lifer
Jul 11, 2001
33,222
5,106
126
The truth is in between. Anti-vax people (which decades previously were hippy leftists) were gravitating to the Republican party well before Covid-19 hit. Here is a pre-Covid link: https://www.politico.com/story/2019/05/27/anti-vaccine-republican-mainstream-1344955 . So, in that sense, Trump did not cause the anti-vax sentiment.

But, then the entire Trump vaccine strategy is to look like a hero for Operation Warp Speed, reopening the economy, and then blaming Democrats since Covid first hit Democratic states the hardest: https://www.businessinsider.com/kushner-covid-19-plan-maybe-axed-for-political-reasons-report-2020-7 Building a whole political strategy around the vaccines significantly magnified the vaccine hesitancy when the vaccines came out after the election. It meant that Trump did not get to claim victory on Covid prior to the election.
I don't know where you get this. I think it's absolutely false. Hippy leftists never became anti-vaxxers or Republicans.
 
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MrSquished

Lifer
Jan 14, 2013
14,325
11,217
136
Got the Pfizer booster to go along with the previous two Pfizer shots. They didn't have Moderna available at the Walgreens I had an appointment at, but I asked.

She said most of the places around there were booked solid for shots, there just happened to have more openings. No idea how that worked out, this Walgreens is in a dense area. Weird.
 

pmv

Lifer
May 30, 2008
10,218
4,958
136
The truth is in between. Anti-vax people (which decades previously were hippy leftists) were gravitating to the Republican party well before Covid-19 hit.
That's such a massive distortion of the facts. The truth is far more complicated, and among other things has to acknowledge the fact that right at the dawn of vaccination programs it wasn't entirely irrational to be anti-vax. If you look at what the early vaccinations (or, more accurately, inoculations) involved you could hardly blame people for not being keen on them.

But there was no group of people who were 'anti vax' and 'leftist' but then 'gravitated' to the Republican party. There have always been a variety of different demographically and politically-defined groups who distrusted vaccine programs for differing reasons.

What is a noticable trend, is that the whackier, more new-age, type hippies - who have always tended to be right-wing, were never 'leftists' in the first place - have become more-and-more influenced by, and drawn into, the far-right.

 

nakedfrog

No Lifer
Apr 3, 2001
53,781
6,281
126
Booster demand here in Austin appears robust. Especially for mRNA shots. Lots of places booked up till next week unless you’re willing to drive 20-30 miles out of town.
I didn't look beyond the closest store to me that has Moderna (which is just over a mile away), and the soonest appointment I could get was 12/2. Then a sizeable gap, until the week leading up to Christmas.
 

K1052

Lifer
Aug 21, 2003
39,708
16,935
136
I didn't look beyond the closest store to me that has Moderna (which is just over a mile away), and the soonest appointment I could get was 12/2. Then a sizeable gap, until the week leading up to Christmas.
Since most of the big mass vaccination sites have wound down the burden is on the retail pharmacies this time around. Probably more staffing limitations than lack of vaccine.
 

KMFJD

Lifer
Aug 11, 2005
24,487
29,300
136
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Charmonium

Diamond Member
May 15, 2015
6,622
685
126
If you look at what the early vaccinations (or, more accurately, inoculations) involved you could hardly blame people for not being keen on them.
Everyone should probably take a look at the following to understand the difference between these a couple of other terms.

Colloquially, both terms seem to be used interchangeably but according to dictionary.com, but inoculation is much broader and has a specific "term of art" meaning. So for example, you can vaccinate a person but you inoculate a petrie dish (OR a person).

 

Captante

Lifer
Oct 20, 2003
23,053
5,103
136
Covid numbers for CT since Friday.... "daily positivity" back up to 3.53%.

:(

Overall SummaryTotalChange Since Friday
COVID-19 Cases (confirmed and probable)414,978+2,060
COVID-19 Tests Reported (molecular and antigen)12,242,821+58,379
Daily Test Positivity--3.53%
Patients Currently Hospitalized with COVID-19268+21
 
Feb 4, 2009
31,918
12,297
136
Covid numbers for CT since Friday.... "daily positivity" back up to 3.53%.

:(

Overall SummaryTotalChange Since Friday
COVID-19 Cases (confirmed and probable)414,978+2,060
COVID-19 Tests Reported (molecular and antigen)12,242,821+58,379
Daily Test Positivity--3.53%
Patients Currently Hospitalized with COVID-19268+21
However they don’t appear to be going to the hospital which is/was the goal of getting vaccinated.
Personally I am fine if I get it and ride it out at home.

 

Torn Mind

Diamond Member
Nov 25, 2012
8,525
1,546
126
The stuff going on in some of these places like Austria is completely insane. That's probably coming here too. Pretty much a totalitarian dictatorship.
Might as well let Austria beta test the policy just to see the fallout.

Then in the future, when there is yet another surge, the fat cats can finally start focusing on other post-infection treatments.
 

KMFJD

Lifer
Aug 11, 2005
24,487
29,300
136
I keep hearing this argument -

-COVID vaxxx does not stop you from catching COVID, spreading COVID-19, or dying from COVID

I found the most Canadian response

-Having a goaltender in the goal does not prevent the other team from scoring goals. But trying playing the game without one.
 
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Charmonium

Diamond Member
May 15, 2015
6,622
685
126
Something that no one seems to talk much about is all of the people the health care system will have to deal with who get covid and have long term sequelae (i.e., side effects) like hearing loss, brain, lung and other organ damage.

That's why I got my booster and will get another in 4 or 5 months or whenever the data says that antibody levels start to wane.
 

Red Squirrel

No Lifer
May 24, 2003
62,665
9,780
126
twitter.com
I keep hearing this argument -

-COVID vaxxx does not stop you from catching COVID, spreading COVID-19, or dying from COVID

I found the most Canadian response

-Having a goaltender in the goal does not prevent the other team from scoring goals. But trying playing the game without one.
Mandating the other team to also have a goalie is not going to do anything though. ;) The goalie protects only that team's net. Same with a vaccine, it protects you, not other people, there is no aura of protection, it just does not work that way. The others around you need to be vaccinated too if they want to be protected.
 

pmv

Lifer
May 30, 2008
10,218
4,958
136
Everyone should probably take a look at the following to understand the difference between these a couple of other terms.

Colloquially, both terms seem to be used interchangeably but according to dictionary.com, but inoculation is much broader and has a specific "term of art" meaning. So for example, you can vaccinate a person but you inoculate a petrie dish (OR a person).


I'm going on


Inoculation originated as a method for the prevention of smallpox by deliberate introduction of material from smallpox pustules from one person into the skin of another. The usual route of transmission of smallpox was through the air, invading the mucous membranes of the mouth, nose, or respiratory tract, before migrating throughout the body via the lymphatic system, resulting in an often severe disease. In contrast, infection of the skin usually led to a milder, localized infection – but, crucially, still induced immunity to the virus. This first method for smallpox prevention, smallpox inoculation, is now also known as variolation. Inoculation has ancient origins and the technique was known in India, Africa and China.[2]
So I guess the appropriate term for the original approach might be variolation - but 'innocuatlion' seems to cover it as well.

When you are telling people "we're going to take some of the ooze from this fellow's oozing pustule, and then cut your child's arm and smear it into the wound" I don't think it's that surprising that people were not keen on the process, still less on it being compulsory.

The process now known as vaccination (as I understand it, dead virus material, or the mRNA technology which seems to be even further removed from being the live active virus) is clearly much more sophisticated and concequently ought to be less alarming.
 
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Torn Mind

Diamond Member
Nov 25, 2012
8,525
1,546
126
Mandating the other team to also have a goalie is not going to do anything though. ;) The goalie protects only that team's net. Same with a vaccine, it protects you, not other people, there is no aura of protection, it just does not work that way. The others around you need to be vaccinated too if they want to be protected.
I think practice would be a more on point analogy. If folks have had no practice, and they haven't be exposed ever, they would be wise to practice, on a general collective level.

There is no insurance in case rare injury does happen in practice however, and the bosses will simply cut you rather than even try to care.
 

MrSquished

Lifer
Jan 14, 2013
14,325
11,217
136
Mandating the other team to also have a goalie is not going to do anything though. ;) The goalie protects only that team's net. Same with a vaccine, it protects you, not other people, there is no aura of protection, it just does not work that way. The others around you need to be vaccinated too if they want to be protected.
Completely false. While vaccines do not prevent the spread of the virus 100% by any means, they definitely reduce the chance of spreading it significantly, as per the science.
 
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Charmonium

Diamond Member
May 15, 2015
6,622
685
126
The process now known as vaccination (as I understand it, dead virus material, or the mRNA technology which seems to be even further removed from being the live active virus) is clearly much more sophisticated and concequently ought to be less alarming.
Exactly so. I'm not a molecular biologist but my understanding is this. The manufacturer tells a machine capable of making short RNA strands that code for spike proteins.

Anyway, these are just raw RNA strands. They get slurped up by your muscle cells which then spit out the proteins. And the only thing they're good for is triggering the immune system.

Side note - to give you some idea of just how sensitive the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test is. This first became available in the late 80's. I was dating someone new at the time and was deathly afraid of HIV. So I insisted that we both go for an HIV PCR test.

That targets certain codons unique to the virus, amplifies them and then tests for them.

Well, I was taking an RNA/DNA yeast supplement at the time and the test for one codon, just one, came back positive. OMG, did she freak the fuck out. I wasn't concerned at all since I was reasonably sure all they were looking at were one of the molecules from my supplement. I stopped taking it, got tested again and everything was fine. She never forgave me for laughing at her though.

Remember when I said it looked for unique codons. Well, apparently that only meant codons not shared between the virus and humans. Hahahaha.

edit - If you read this soon after it was posted, my apologies. I got my proteins and RNA confused. D'oh.
 
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nakedfrog

No Lifer
Apr 3, 2001
53,781
6,281
126
Mandating the other team to also have a goalie is not going to do anything though. ;) The goalie protects only that team's net. Same with a vaccine, it protects you, not other people, there is no aura of protection, it just does not work that way. The others around you need to be vaccinated too if they want to be protected.
Yeah, that's great, until someone who hasn't been vaccinated is taking up a hospital bed that could have been used by someone else.
 
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Charmonium

Diamond Member
May 15, 2015
6,622
685
126
Yeah, that's great, until someone who hasn't been vaccinated is taking up a hospital bed that could have been used by someone else.
Even the news doesn't cover this much, not that I've seen. But there are a lot of sick people in this U.S. of A. and to at least some extent, every country. Aside from all of the immuno-compromised folks (which doesn't mean just HIV, that's probably the minority), there are people with heart, kidney and lung problems. They can often be in desperate need of hospitalization as well.

And I really do hate to be like this, but if I'm a doctor and I need to choose between an unvaccinated covid patient who comes in barely able to breathe and 3 or 4 non-covid patients who also need the ICU, I'm sorry dude, but you're going to the bottom of the list.
 
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