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NON_POLITICAL China Coronavirus THREAD

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Torn Mind

Diamond Member
Nov 25, 2012
6,256
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While I agree with you in principle, we are going to find many additional variants even if 85% of eligible Americans are vaccinated. If we could get 85% those eligible in the World vaccinated - then the likelihood of successful new variants would be severely diminished.
The list of countries with super low vaccination rates is enormous and India, where Delta came from, is not even at 50%. Pretty much all of Africa is "naked" and they may not even get the vaccine until 2023.

.https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-021-01762-w
 
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blackangst1

Lifer
Feb 23, 2005
20,990
853
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My employer, a nationwide health insurance provider, is considering moving to permanent WFH. We've been out of office for 18 months, and business is great. Im a network engineer, so need to go to the raised floor occasionally to rack new hardware, but otherwise havent been to the office more than 5 times. The business has learned it can function at 100% with everyone remote, and it would be a great business decision to go full time WFH. Lower operating costs for the business, much better work/life balance for employees.
 

[DHT]Osiris

Diamond Member
Dec 15, 2015
9,223
5,331
146
My employer, a nationwide health insurance provider, is considering moving to permanent WFH. We've been out of office for 18 months, and business is great. Im a network engineer, so need to go to the raised floor occasionally to rack new hardware, but otherwise havent been to the office more than 5 times. The business has learned it can function at 100% with everyone remote, and it would be a great business decision to go full time WFH. Lower operating costs for the business, much better work/life balance for employees.
Higher ed here, general sysad. Small but mixed shop of sysad, security, network engineering. Frustratingly resistant to moving full WFH, though we've been full remote for the last 18mo, minus a visit or two for failed disks/batteries. We just started the process of implementing our 'hybrid' policy... Just as the uni announced we're going back to masking up indoors (per CDC and local health admin guidance). I'm actually betting a fiver that we go back into lockdown due to delta before I take a step into the office.
 
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Dec 10, 2005
21,279
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The business has learned it can function at 100% with everyone remote, and it would be a great business decision to go full time WFH. Lower operating costs for the business, much better work/life balance for employees.
I'd say the WFH is a mixed bag. I personally love it, and have been doing it for nearly 3 years. I don't think I'd ever want to go back to 4-5 days/week in the office. Others do better with a separation between home life and work life, especially if you don't have the space at home for dedicated work spaces.

What I'd probably like to see is companies offer options to their employees: space for people that want an office, optional hybrid model, or full remote.
 

Ajay

Diamond Member
Jan 8, 2001
9,403
3,899
136
And the wheels of the bus go round and round. I'm starting to feel like Delta is just going to race around the world, kill allot of people and create another drop in the world economy (likely not as bad as the first year). Swell. On the plus side, maybe this will *finally* wake up some people so they get vaccinated. With all the vaccine doses ordered by the US government, everybody eligible could have been vaccinated by the end of summer (IIRC). The biggest threat to humanity is humans :rolleyes:
 
Feb 4, 2009
31,362
11,765
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And the wheels of the bus go round and round. I'm starting to feel like Delta is just going to race around the world, kill allot of people and create another drop in the world economy (likely not as bad as the first year). Swell. On the plus side, maybe this will *finally* wake up some people so they get vaccinated. With all the vaccine doses ordered by the US government, everybody eligible could have been vaccinated by the end of summer (IIRC). The biggest threat to humanity is humans :rolleyes:
yeah just read Mississippi and FL (I think FL) vaccinations are more than double what they were last week.
 

Red Squirrel

No Lifer
May 24, 2003
60,786
9,048
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www.uovalor.com
So is the vaccine not actually protecting from Delta or what? Or are they just making a huge deal out of mild cases that the vaccine prevented from becoming big cases?
 
Feb 4, 2009
31,362
11,765
136
So is the vaccine not actually protecting from Delta or what? Or are they just making a huge deal out of mild cases that the vaccine prevented from becoming big cases?
Appears all but certain all three US vaccines protect well against hospitalization and better against death.
Jury is still out on general infection as of now seems vaccinated are slightly less likely to catch delta but not by a large percentage.
 
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blackangst1

Lifer
Feb 23, 2005
20,990
853
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I'd say the WFH is a mixed bag. I personally love it, and have been doing it for nearly 3 years. I don't think I'd ever want to go back to 4-5 days/week in the office. Others do better with a separation between home life and work life, especially if you don't have the space at home for dedicated work spaces.

What I'd probably like to see is companies offer options to their employees: space for people that want an office, optional hybrid model, or full remote.
It'd be difficult with us. As of now, you need executive permission just to go into the office, and even then its mask up, temp check at the door, etc.
 

[DHT]Osiris

Diamond Member
Dec 15, 2015
9,223
5,331
146
So is the vaccine not actually protecting from Delta or what? Or are they just making a huge deal out of mild cases that the vaccine prevented from becoming big cases?
I think the current best guess is, it prevents an infection from landing you in a hospital 99% of the time, but it doesn't prevent you from spreading it, as immunization usually would to a virus. Normally by the time the virus has replicated enough to reasonably start infecting others, your immune system goes all sparta on it. This replicates so damned fast that you're breathing it out before your immune system has a chance to start firing up... Like, within hours of infection you're a vector.

Anyhow, not sure how to get rid of it assuming the above is true. A handful of people in an office could just bounce it between themselves and their families in perpetuity.
 

Kaido

Elite Member & Kitchen Overlord
Feb 14, 2004
45,996
3,111
126
About a Doctor in some shit hole State who stays open past his normal hours and brings in some volunteer nurses(?) to vaccinate people after hours. They keep people in separate rooms and let them leave with the cover of darkness. Nobody knowing there were there.
There's a market for everything! Also:

 

njdevilsfan87

Platinum Member
Apr 19, 2007
2,168
157
106
I'm really starting to get concerned about the course this virus will take. Because if Delta is going to rip through the world vaccinated or not, then it must only be a matter of time before we end up with a mutation we really don't want. I'm glad vaccines seem to offer protection against worst outcome per individual right now, but for how long? Boosters will take 6 months to get up to mass production levels, and that's just in the US. I'm not at all confident we can keep up with this thing. And if we can't keep up, and we looking at future border lockdowns and very strict quarantine measures for anyone coming in? (like New Zealand)

The only glimmer of hope I see right now is the number of new UK cases are falling as quickly as they went up. Maybe Delta is actually too good for its own good, in that it infects so many people in a short period of time it actually blocks future transmission routes...
 
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Spacehead

Lifer
Jun 2, 2002
11,702
6,074
136
I think the current best guess is, it prevents an infection from landing you in a hospital 99% of the time, but it doesn't prevent you from spreading it, as immunization usually would to a virus. Normally by the time the virus has replicated enough to reasonably start infecting others, your immune system goes all sparta on it. This replicates so damned fast that you're breathing it out before your immune system has a chance to start firing up... Like, within hours of infection you're a vector.

Anyhow, not sure how to get rid of it assuming the above is true. A handful of people in an office could just bounce it between themselves and their families in perpetuity.
Originally(early versions of covid), if you tested positive & you quarantined for a period of time you had a little immunity & it was safe to be around others... not spreading it to others.
Delta is not the same? If you test positive is a 2 week quarantine(or whatever the length was) still long enough to not be contagious?
 

K1052

Lifer
Aug 21, 2003
37,488
12,002
136
I'm really starting to get concerned about the course this virus will take. Because if Delta is going to rip through the world vaccinated or not, then it must only be a matter of time before we end up with a mutation we really don't want. I'm glad vaccines seem to offer protection against worst outcome per individual right now, but for how long? Boosters will take 6 months to get up to mass production levels, and that's just in the US. I'm not at all confident we can keep up with this thing. And if we can't keep up, and we looking at future border lockdowns and very strict quarantine measures for anyone coming in? (like New Zealand)

The only glimmer of hope I see right now is the number of new UK cases are falling as quickly as they went up. Maybe Delta is actually too good for its own good, in that it infects so many people in a short period of time it actually blocks future transmission routes...
mRNA guys can pump out new vaccine in weeks probably at full scale. Current vaccines are still good so I’m not really worried. The unvaccinated are the people who should worry.
 
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[DHT]Osiris

Diamond Member
Dec 15, 2015
9,223
5,331
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Originally(early versions of covid), if you tested positive & you quarantined for a period of time you had a little immunity & it was safe to be around others... not spreading it to others.
Delta is not the same? If you test positive is a 2 week quarantine(or whatever the length was) still long enough to not be contagious?
As far as I know, if you quarantine yes, you won't infect others, you won't be contagious, etc.

The problem is, with a normal infection (think flu, common cold viruses, etc) if you have an immunity to the virus, your body defeats intruding viruses before it reproduces to the point where you're sneezing it out, breathing it out, etc. With Delta that appears to not be the case. Yeah you can totes quarantine if you're infected, but it's been hard enough to get people to even get the vaccine, much less quarantine after being vaccinated.
 

K1052

Lifer
Aug 21, 2003
37,488
12,002
136
Originally(early versions of covid), if you tested positive & you quarantined for a period of time you had a little immunity & it was safe to be around others... not spreading it to others.
Delta is not the same? If you test positive is a 2 week quarantine(or whatever the length was) still long enough to not be contagious?
vaccinated people with breakthrough cases clear faster and are ill for less time. That’s going to mean transmitting for less time too.

 
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Feb 4, 2009
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Bit of good news here. Fully vaccinated are essentially non existent in hospitalization & death. Like way less than 1%
Admitted this can change but as of now that’s what the numbers show.

 
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Red Squirrel

No Lifer
May 24, 2003
60,786
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www.uovalor.com
As long as vaccine protects us I feel they are making too big of a deal out of this then. I'm sure the flu probably spreads the same way too. I suppose there is still concern that a mutation forms that is not covered by the vaccine but at that point not sure how you prevent that either way, even if 100% of people were to get vaccinated. I think the only way to stop this is to have a 100% full lock down for 2-3 weeks globally to stop the spread dead in it's tracks. You basically halt the world economy and everyone literally stays home for that period with supplies they were told to get before hand (this could be planned months in advance). The half lockdowns where half of people still need to work while the other half are allowed to travel kinda does not work. But a full lock down is probably not really easily executed either. you're still going to have people that absolutely need to go out of the house like first responders, or people who get a medical emergency etc. So yeah really not sure what the best course of action is.
 

Torn Mind

Diamond Member
Nov 25, 2012
6,256
790
126
As long as vaccine protects us I feel they are making too big of a deal out of this then. I'm sure the flu probably spreads the same way too. I suppose there is still concern that a mutation forms that is not covered by the vaccine but at that point not sure how you prevent that either way, even if 100% of people were to get vaccinated. I think the only way to stop this is to have a 100% full lock down for 2-3 weeks globally to stop the spread dead in it's tracks. You basically halt the world economy and everyone literally stays home for that period with supplies they were told to get before hand (this could be planned months in advance). The half lockdowns where half of people still need to work while the other half are allowed to travel kinda does not work. But a full lock down is probably not really easily executed either. you're still going to have people that absolutely need to go out of the house like first responders, or people who get a medical emergency etc. So yeah really not sure what the best course of action is.
The general health of a population doesn't make the few people's suffering any less. Long COVID sucks and I'm fortunate the effects have been mostly temporary. But "temporary" is 3-4 months in my case. The pulling of the Black Lotus remains to devastating to those whose immune system happen to offer no protection.

Numbers for COVID are almost always going to be underreported because some don't know they have it and the corporate structure incentives blaming deaths on anything but COVID.
 

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