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NON_POLITICAL China Coronavirus THREAD

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mopardude87

Diamond Member
Oct 22, 2018
3,348
1,575
96
I haven't seen kids at these places.

You should have seen Microcenter when I went there this past Saturday too. T
Good, glad some people are making sense of things. About Microcenter i only wish i could have one here, i been to one long ago and thought it was amazing. This time i am glad for Newegg i get stuff cheap and in like 2-3 days normally. At this time i am fine ordering online but all gloves are off prob in Aug if we return and if i go to Vegas, the Best Frys is out there off the strip. Assuming that one is not dead either......
 

FelixDeCat

Lifer
Aug 4, 2000
27,131
798
126
Pandemic? Schmandemic. Spring is in the air. If the shelter in place thing doesnt end soon, you are probably going to see a nationwide outbreak of frustrated people randomly getting together in protest and in open violation of social distancing.

Unless they plan on dispersing large crowds with 2-chlorobenzalmalononitrile and volatile solvents en masse igniting larger protests, we are going to have start scaling down this response gradually a lot sooner than expected.
 

DrMrLordX

Lifer
Apr 27, 2000
18,516
7,394
136
The main reason for dropping the ball is capitalism. The constant need to cut costs and cut corners everywhere. Every time someone says "we should do X in case Y happens" the answer is always "We can't, that costs money".
Government-run (read: not purely market-based capitalism) programs constantly cut corners. They just don't pay providers when they feel unable to do so:


Though I've heard payout rates as low as 65% in some cases, that article indicates 88% which is still not great. Fact is that most medicine in the United States isn't governed by capitalism anyway. Blaming capitalism on any part of the Covid-19 response in the United States is pure madness.

I wonder if you are covered with healthcare if you are furloughed.
Best to start asking questions of your insurance underwriter now.

we are going to have start scaling down this response gradually a lot sooner than expected.
Well really, it has to end soon anyway. There are lots of asymptomatic carriers out there that are recovering or have already recovered with antibodies in their systems that are at no real risk of further exposure and aren't a risk to anyone who still hasn't gotten the bug. Add in all the folks that got sick and got over it, and you're looking at a huge percentage of the population. Trick is to keep the active cases locked down and let everyone else out.
 
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Kaido

Elite Member & Kitchen Overlord
Feb 14, 2004
46,271
3,269
126
Unless they plan on dispersing large crowds with 2-chlorobenzalmalononitrile and volatile solvents en masse igniting larger protests, we are going to have start scaling down this response gradually a lot sooner than expected.


 

PingSpike

Lifer
Feb 25, 2004
21,643
478
126
You are 1000% wrong about that. You have to remember how stupid people are. I mean people will wait in line at Costco for 45 minutes to save $3 in gas. Many people don't get that time = money.
There was a promo at a nearby gas station for $20 off your fill up a few years ago, only valid for a couple hours I believe. The gas station was jam packed with huge lines. A VP at work drove his BMW convertible down there and was gone for like 2 hours. I obviously don't know his salary, but it probably is more than $10/hr.
 

PingSpike

Lifer
Feb 25, 2004
21,643
478
126
The P100 is excellent but, yeah, a little extreme-looking. ;)

Most contractor dust masks are N95. Even if they aren't, they should be better than nothing and are likely better than home-made as long as you can get a good seal.
I looked at these dust masks, they don't say N95 anywhere on them. They don't say anything actually, I don't think there is a brand on them. If it is its probably "Good Air Face" not "3M". I know the contractor respirators you can get are N95 but I'm pretty sure these are not.
 

brianmanahan

Lifer
Sep 2, 2006
22,216
3,728
126
Most contractor dust masks are N95. Even if they aren't, they should be better than nothing and are likely better than home-made as long as you can get a good seal.
my friend has a bunch of N95s for work but he's afraid to wear them out in public
 

pmv

Diamond Member
May 30, 2008
9,574
4,282
136
There are lots of asymptomatic carriers out there that are recovering or have already recovered with antibodies in their systems that are at no real risk of further exposure and aren't a risk to anyone who still hasn't gotten the bug.
Evidence for this claim? "Lots" is a ridiculously vague word to base a policy on anyway.

Add in all the folks that got sick and got over it, and you're looking at a huge percentage of the population.
Evidence for this (highly dubious) claim?


Trick is to keep the active cases locked down and let everyone else out.
So you need a lot more testing, then, otherwise how do you know who those 'active cases' are?
 

mopardude87

Diamond Member
Oct 22, 2018
3,348
1,575
96
he said he read that someone get attacked for wearing one

oh yeah that's a good idea, just cover with something else
My best friend has been ranting about how " he feels judged" by those wearing a mask and its true people do stare at you if your not wearing one. He normally doesn't want to wear one as he doesn't mix like me .I had plans to share a few of the 5 masks i get from Newegg next week with him but since he is so fond of the things i will give them to a friend who has a family of 5. He will be thankful i am sure. I got a new in pack KN95 for a emergency. It sits in glove box for those what if moments. Not gonna need the 5 N95 prob i mix once a month for food/stuff and that is it. Good till May as is :) Newegg appears to be gifting those N95 in the carts?At least in mine they include it.

He went as far as to say only liberals wear them everywhere, yeah my head hurts processing his thinking process. I pressed the case that big box stores and crowds of more then 5 at least maybe warrant the mask. Not sitting in your car like we seen people do by themselves and wear the things.....i got him to agree on that at least.

Edit: Newegg out of stock on the masks they include in the cart as gift, not surprised.
 
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mopardude87

Diamond Member
Oct 22, 2018
3,348
1,575
96
Next question:
I know its fake, but is washing your hands a liberal conspiracy or a scam by big soap?
Oh if i had to guess its more in the realm of common damn sense. I got a religion almost started here considering the washing of the hands. Its almost biblical how often and when i wash. It's not ocd obsessive yet but petting cats, opening up fridges and handling frozen/cold food prior to cooking all warrant washing them .

I am sure there is a soap religion somewhere right about now, there is a actual fanclub page on facebook for nick cages hair. Why in the heck not soap at this point? I know for a fact i already seen Covid-19 based porno, i swear to tech jesus its a thing. Don't ask how i know, just trust and believe its INSANE!
 
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DrMrLordX

Lifer
Apr 27, 2000
18,516
7,394
136
Evidence for this claim? "Lots" is a ridiculously vague word to base a policy on anyway.
Not reading the thread are we?


Anyone who is an asymptomatic carrier recovers in about 10-15 days. Serotype testing for antibodies can confirm this status.

Evidence for this (highly dubious) claim?
I know this thread is long but come now:


I have it linked to the correct time for you. "82% of cases have symptoms that are mild" according to earlier data. I've seen this repeated often, and I see little evidence to suggest otherwise. Taking the two bodies of evidence together, it seems that 50% of cases show no symptoms, ~30% of cases show mild symptoms typical of other ailments, and ~20% of cases develop into something potentially worse.

So you need a lot more testing, then, otherwise how do you know who those 'active cases' are?
It's actually easier than you might think. At this point in the game, serology testing is more useful for those who have no symptoms. It tells us the exposure rate among the population that has not required hospitalization. With few exceptions, covid-19 has been spreading since mid February in the United States, if not earlier. Many of those who a). have sheltered in place and b). not been hospitalized have already had sufficient time to excise the virus from their system (remember: it takes about two weeks to recover when asymptomatic or when symptoms are mild enough that the immune system isn't busy punching holes in lung tissue). In other words, by this point, if you have no symptoms, you've either never had it or odds are very good that you aren't capable of spreading it anymore.

I fully expect most states to maintain the current stance until April 30th. Some locations may take longer. By that point, the odds of actually contracting the disease from people who aren't actively displaying symptoms will be a lot lower than they were just a few weeks ago.

Increase serology testing would give us some idea of those who are still vulnerable in the population and those who are not. Those who already have antibodies are generally pretty safe to be around if you've already got them yourself, and beyond a certain point in time (which arguably we've already reached), the vast majority of those with antibodies will be safe for those without them.

Next question:
I know its fake, but is washing your hands a liberal conspiracy or a scam by big soap?
Who in the public sector invested in Big Soap back in January? Hmmmmmm?
 
Nov 8, 2012
20,778
4,757
136
The main reason for dropping the ball is capitalism. The constant need to cut costs and cut corners everywhere. Every time someone says "we should do X in case Y happens" the answer is always "We can't, that costs money". Then a pandemic like this happens and guess what, there is no spare equipment to be found and no easy way to obtain it because nobody wanted to have it in first place because they cared more about money.

This goes for lot of things, for example in IT. Anyone who has worked IT knows how hard it is to get spare parts to have on hand so that if something fails you're not scrambling.
Government-run (read: not purely market-based capitalism) programs constantly cut corners. They just don't pay providers when they feel unable to do so:

Yeah I don't really understand the boner people are getting for this magical word called "Socialism" where-in they believe that a pandemic is being exacerbated by a economic system.

The concept of comparing to countries with socialized medicine isn't anywhere remotely close to a system of socialism. It's just simply a nationwide mandatory health insurance plan. That's it. You pool all your money (via high taxation to the government) in order to provide care to everyone instead of just folks who can afford it.

It's not even government run because doctors aren't government employees.


Really capitalism is the reason the world is able to respond with what they can. You think people that invent modern medicine want to do the tiresome work with minimal pay, living in a slum, and being forced to sell their product for a minimal amount?
 

K1052

Lifer
Aug 21, 2003
38,073
12,977
136
Common theme I'm starting to read in multiple stories as the virus hits small town and rural areas: They thought this was a big city only disease.

The idea (implied or otherwise) that small town values, relative remoteness, and some sense of good old country know how was going to keep this out is as disappointing as it is predictable. The hammer has yet to really come down on these parts of America but be assured it's on the way.
 

pmv

Diamond Member
May 30, 2008
9,574
4,282
136
Not reading the thread are we?


Anyone who is an asymptomatic carrier recovers in about 10-15 days. Serotype testing for antibodies can confirm this status.



I know this thread is long but come now:


I have it linked to the correct time for you. "82% of cases have symptoms that are mild" according to earlier data. I've seen this repeated often, and I see little evidence to suggest otherwise. Taking the two bodies of evidence together, it seems that 50% of cases show no symptoms, ~30% of cases show mild symptoms typical of other ailments, and ~20% of cases develop into something potentially worse.



It's actually easier than you might think. At this point in the game, serology testing is more useful for those who have no symptoms. It tells us the exposure rate among the population that has not required hospitalization. With few exceptions, covid-19 has been spreading since mid February in the United States, if not earlier. Many of those who a). have sheltered in place and b). not been hospitalized have already had sufficient time to excise the virus from their system (remember: it takes about two weeks to recover when asymptomatic or when symptoms are mild enough that the immune system isn't busy punching holes in lung tissue). In other words, by this point, if you have no symptoms, you've either never had it or odds are very good that you aren't capable of spreading it anymore.

I fully expect most states to maintain the current stance until April 30th. Some locations may take longer. By that point, the odds of actually contracting the disease from people who aren't actively displaying symptoms will be a lot lower than they were just a few weeks ago.

Increase serology testing would give us some idea of those who are still vulnerable in the population and those who are not. Those who already have antibodies are generally pretty safe to be around if you've already got them yourself, and beyond a certain point in time (which arguably we've already reached), the vast majority of those with antibodies will be safe for those without them.



Who in the public sector invested in Big Soap back in January? Hmmmmmm?

None of that supports the claim you made.

Where is your evidence that 'a huge percentage of the population' now have immunity?

Nor does it support the claim that 'there are lots of asymptomatic carriers out there'. How do you know that? All your link says is that 50% of infectees are asymptomatic. It says nothing about what proportion of the population is currently infected. In order to say how many asymptomatic carriers are out there, you need to know how many people are infected.
 
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Red Squirrel

No Lifer
May 24, 2003
61,692
9,405
126
www.uovalor.com
Common theme I'm starting to read in multiple stories as the virus hits small town and rural areas: They thought this was a big city only disease.

The idea (implied or otherwise) that small town values, relative remoteness, and some sense of good old country know how was going to keep this out is as disappointing as it is predictable. The hammer has yet to really come down on these parts of America but be assured it's on th

Yeah even here we have like 30ish cases now last I checked. Heck there are even some in the territories.

The good thing is being in a smaller city or even remote makes it a bit easier to keep under control as there's just less people and more land. Like I can go for a walk or go to the grocery store without really getting near people. When I'm walking if someone else is coming I just move over and they move over and we keep the 2m distance. Same in grocery stores etc.

Now my ultimate dream right now would be to have my own off grid property and being financially independent. I'd have my own trails etc to walk in and generate most of my own resources. I'd invite my parents over too and they would be safe as well in their own cabin.
 

K1052

Lifer
Aug 21, 2003
38,073
12,977
136
I fully expect most states to maintain the current stance until April 30th. Some locations may take longer. By that point, the odds of actually contracting the disease from people who aren't actively displaying symptoms will be a lot lower than they were just a few weeks ago.

Increase serology testing would give us some idea of those who are still vulnerable in the population and those who are not. Those who already have antibodies are generally pretty safe to be around if you've already got them yourself, and beyond a certain point in time (which arguably we've already reached), the vast majority of those with antibodies will be safe for those without them.

I'm kind of thinking May for mass serology testing. The more populous states seem unlikely to majorly let up until there is an ocean of test capacity at their disposal. By summer the speed and capacity of molecular testing should also be much more built up than now.
 

brianmanahan

Lifer
Sep 2, 2006
22,216
3,728
126
Really capitalism is the reason the world is able to respond with what they can. You think people that invent modern medicine want to do the tiresome work with minimal pay, living in a slum, and being forced to sell their product for a minimal amount?
it's kinda true

money is the only reason i get up in the morning most days

i don't even spend it, i just hoard it so that someday i won't have to get up in the morning
 

Greenman

Lifer
Oct 15, 1999
18,158
3,159
126
Speaking of Slickdals, they had a front-page deal on a gallon of "Froggy's Simply Sanitizer WHO formulation" last week and I was about to order it for $37.99 when I decided to read the comments. There I saw people complaining about the smell and consistency, describing it almost exactly how I would describe the smell of the gallon of "Denatured Alcohol" (methylated spirits) I got from Lowe's last year. That stuff was WAAAAAY cheaper too! I recall it being under $10 for a gallon-sized can. The more I read the more sure I was that this was simply denatured Ethyl alcohol where they add acetone and other stuff to make it non-palatable... except the Froggy's people also added a little glycerin as a moisturizer. I decided not to buy it.

Well, it's been over a week now and they updated the site in response to some PayPal charge-backs. Sure enough, they mention the smell and clarify that it uses Denatured Ethyl Alcohol:
...though they promise they'll change the formula when isopropyl becomes available again.

Though I've seen some warnings about using denatured alcohol because you don't know what they added to denature it (no standard between various producers), the can of "Jasco" brand that I got says it's clean burning for alcohol stoves and Bunsen burners and can be used as an ammonia-free glass cleaner (cleans streak-residue/deposit free). If it can be used for stoves I assume there is some consideration for food-grade safety. For whatever reason the Jasco-brand Denatured Alcohol I bought does not show up on Lowe's website even for in-store pickup even though that's where I found it, and it's always been that way (probably due to regulations on the sale of grain alcohol). I think I spent less than $10, which is a quarter the price of the Froggy's stuff.

If you can put up with the smell, just put it in a spray bottle and follow up with hand lotion after your hands dry. No reason to give them four times as much just for a little added glycerin. It almost got me but that's one front page Slickdeals post that definitely is NOT a slick deal.
Can't buy denatured alcohol in CA anymore, it's banned.
 

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