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Question Nokia 2.2 / Kernel Architecture

NextGen_Gamer

Junior Member
Jun 29, 2020
6
0
6
Hi everyone!


I'm hoping that someone here can confirm the kernel architecture of the Android system in the Nokia 2.2 phone. I need to know for sure if it is 32-bit or 64-bit (AArch64) compatible. From browsing the Geekbench 5 results on their website, it looks to be AArch64 but I would really like to know 100% before buying it. Thanks to whoever can help me figure this out!
 

bononos

Diamond Member
Aug 21, 2011
3,687
59
91
The soc is 64bit but its relatively slow. Don't think theres any 32bit socs used in phones nowadays except maybe for the very cheapest phones.
 

NextGen_Gamer

Junior Member
Jun 29, 2020
6
0
6
You are correct about the SoC being fully 64-bit compatible - and as you said, nearly every phone no matter how low the price has been shipping with Cortex A53 or A55 cores for quite a while now. But my question is about the Android kernel architecture. What I am learning is that although many (hundreds of millions!) of phones ship every year with 64-bit SoC's, nearly all of them ship with a 32-bit build of Android. And that is something that you cannot change. It is somewhat similar to when Microsoft first brought 64-bit support to Windows. Although Windows computers themselves continued to ship for years with x86-64 processors - they still the 32-bit version of Windows installed.

I was especially disappointed in the brand-new Moto E (2020) that just came out less than 30 days ago. It has a 64-bit SoC of course and Android 10; but it is the 32-bit version of Android 10 (I have confirmed this with Motorola). We are talking about a new $149 phone in mid-2020 still releasing with 32-bit Android :/
 

podspi

Golden Member
Jan 11, 2011
1,933
28
91
Why do you need 64-bit support? Unless you are using new instructions or more than 4gb of RAM, my understanding has always been that there isn't much advantage, as 32-bit apps use less memory, all else being equal.
 

NextGen_Gamer

Junior Member
Jun 29, 2020
6
0
6
Why do you need 64-bit support? Unless you are using new instructions or more than 4gb of RAM, my understanding has always been that there isn't much advantage, as 32-bit apps use less memory, all else being equal.
Pokemon GO is removing support for 32-bit Android devices sometime in August 2020. I'm a hardcore PoGo player lol. I actually run three Level 40 accounts - my main is on my actual iPhone XR daily smartphone. The two other alt accounts I have been running on cheapo Android prepaid phones just without activating them. I hotspot my Verizon connection to them to play.
 

jkj2000

Junior Member
May 23, 2020
4
0
11
Pokemon GO is removing support for 32-bit Android devices sometime in August 2020. I'm a hardcore PoGo player lol. I actually run three Level 40 accounts - my main is on my actual iPhone XR daily smartphone. The two other alt accounts I have been running on cheapo Android prepaid phones just without activating them. I hotspot my Verizon connection to them to play.
Seems odd that Pokemon GO would remove support if most phones shipped today are still 32 bit Android? Did they provide a reason?
 

NextGen_Gamer

Junior Member
Jun 29, 2020
6
0
6
Seems odd that Pokemon GO would remove support if most phones shipped today are still 32 bit Android? Did they provide a reason?
I don't think they realized that most lower-end Android phones still do ship with a 32-bit kernel, so that is why they delayed it a bit. They were going to cut off 32-bit devices on August 1, 2020, but now it is rumored to happen either end of August or September. The reason is so they can remove that entire codebase from the game, which will streamline development going forward and (hopefully) help them fix bugs quicker.

This transition already happened on the Apple side of things a couple of years ago, but of course that was a much easier and cleaner one. The Apple-designed A7 in the iPhone 5S was the first 64-bit ARM64 chip, and iOS at the same time became 64-bit as well. Every iPhone after the 5S was 64-bit from then on. So when Niantic dropped 32-bit support for iOS, all they had to do is simply say everyone with a phone older than the 5S will need to upgrade (which at the time was probably not a lot of people).
 
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