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NOAA: Coolest Winter Since 2001 for U.S., Globe

ProfJohn

Lifer
Jul 28, 2006
18,251
5
0
link
The average temperature across both the contiguous U.S. and the globe during December 2007-February 2008 (climatological boreal winter) was the coolest since 2001, according to scientists at NOAA's National Climatic Data Center in Asheville, N.C. In terms of winter precipitation, Pacific storms bringing heavy precipitation to large parts of the West produced high snowpack that will provide welcome runoff this spring.

U.S. Winter Temperature Highlights
In the contiguous United States, the average winter temperature was 33.2°F (0.6°C), which was 0.2°F (0.1°C) above the 20th century average - yet still ranks as the coolest since 2001. It was the 54th coolest winter since national records began in 1895.
I always thought that global warming meant exactly that, global warming.

So how do we have the coldest winter in six years? I would understand the coldest winter in 3 or 4 years, typical yearly fluctuations could create that, but to go back six years seems a little extreme.

Add to this the recent data that shows a 12 month trend of lower global temperatures and perhaps we are seeing the beginning of the end of the global warming scare.

One year or one winter may not be a trend, but it certainly could be the start of a trend.

BTW by most accounts 1998 was the hottest year on record. So not only have we gone nearly a decade without beating the record for hottest year, but we are starting to see downward temperature trends. This can?t not be good for the people who believe in GW.

BTW 2 if GW turns out to be a big mistake does Gore have to give back his Nobel prize?
 

JSt0rm

Lifer
Sep 5, 2000
27,399
3,942
126
I know, 6 years is so long ago. i'm surprised we were even recording temperatures back then.
 

ProfJohn

Lifer
Jul 28, 2006
18,251
5
0
Originally posted by: JSt0rm01
I know, 6 years is so long ago. i'm surprised we were even recording temperatures back then.
How many times have we been told 'we have to do something today, in 10 years it will be too late.'???
 

JSt0rm

Lifer
Sep 5, 2000
27,399
3,942
126
How many times have wqe been told global warming doesn't exist? or does? guess what, I don't care. What does make sense in my mind is NOT polluting the planet. I don't really think its rocket science to understand that we have a impact in some way on the planet and its not up to us to mess it up for future generations. Even if that means using all of the oil on the planet. Why shouldn't we try and save some of that stuff for other generations? More baby boomer self centered bs.
 

Rainsford

Lifer
Apr 25, 2001
17,515
0
0
I always thought that global warming meant exactly that, global warming.
Yes, I know you do. So wouldn't it be better if you researched the topic some, THEN talked about it?
 

halik

Lifer
Oct 10, 2000
25,696
1
0
Originally posted by: ProfJohn
link
The average temperature across both the contiguous U.S. and the globe during December 2007-February 2008 (climatological boreal winter) was the coolest since 2001, according to scientists at NOAA's National Climatic Data Center in Asheville, N.C. In terms of winter precipitation, Pacific storms bringing heavy precipitation to large parts of the West produced high snowpack that will provide welcome runoff this spring.

U.S. Winter Temperature Highlights
In the contiguous United States, the average winter temperature was 33.2°F (0.6°C), which was 0.2°F (0.1°C) above the 20th century average - yet still ranks as the coolest since 2001. It was the 54th coolest winter since national records began in 1895.
I always thought that global warming meant exactly that, global warming.

So how do we have the coldest winter in six years? I would understand the coldest winter in 3 or 4 years, typical yearly fluctuations could create that, but to go back six years seems a little extreme.

Add to this the recent data that shows a 12 month trend of lower global temperatures and perhaps we are seeing the beginning of the end of the global warming scare.

One year or one winter may not be a trend, but it certainly could be the start of a trend.

BTW by most accounts 1998 was the hottest year on record. So not only have we gone nearly a decade without beating the record for hottest year, but we are starting to see downward temperature trends. This can?t not be good for the people who believe in GW.

BTW 2 if GW turns out to be a big mistake does Gore have to give back his Nobel prize?

All your questions are explained here
 

Kerouactivist

Diamond Member
Jul 12, 2001
4,655
0
76
Originally posted by: ProfJohn
link
The average temperature across both the contiguous U.S. and the globe during December 2007-February 2008 (climatological boreal winter) was the coolest since 2001, according to scientists at NOAA's National Climatic Data Center in Asheville, N.C. In terms of winter precipitation, Pacific storms bringing heavy precipitation to large parts of the West produced high snowpack that will provide welcome runoff this spring.

U.S. Winter Temperature Highlights
In the contiguous United States, the average winter temperature was 33.2°F (0.6°C), which was 0.2°F (0.1°C) above the 20th century average - yet still ranks as the coolest since 2001. It was the 54th coolest winter since national records began in 1895.
I always thought that global warming meant exactly that, global warming.

So how do we have the coldest winter in six years? I would understand the coldest winter in 3 or 4 years, typical yearly fluctuations could create that, but to go back six years seems a little extreme.

Add to this the recent data that shows a 12 month trend of lower global temperatures and perhaps we are seeing the beginning of the end of the global warming scare.

One year or one winter may not be a trend, but it certainly could be the start of a trend.

BTW by most accounts 1998 was the hottest year on record. So not only have we gone nearly a decade without beating the record for hottest year, but we are starting to see downward temperature trends. This can?t not be good for the people who believe in GW.

BTW 2 if GW turns out to be a big mistake does Gore have to give back his Nobel prize?

I hope your trying to be sarcastic...if not you really lack any fundamental knowledge of the way science works....

This is more important....than what you are emphasizing "In the contiguous United States, the average winter temperature was 33.2°F (0.6°C), which was 0.2°F (0.1°C) above the 20th century average"...even that by itself would not be a cause for alarm....but the way the data is trending is what looks bad for us....

Conservatives should just stay in the church/cave/compound and leave science to the "Scientists"...they are always trying to muck up things up by taking one bit of information from a huge set of data and using it to say "see see I knew all along I was right, and this science proves it...." All under some veil of being righted by the numbers....what a joke...

 

fskimospy

Elite Member
Mar 10, 2006
73,164
24,757
136
Originally posted by: ProfJohn
link
The average temperature across both the contiguous U.S. and the globe during December 2007-February 2008 (climatological boreal winter) was the coolest since 2001, according to scientists at NOAA's National Climatic Data Center in Asheville, N.C. In terms of winter precipitation, Pacific storms bringing heavy precipitation to large parts of the West produced high snowpack that will provide welcome runoff this spring.

U.S. Winter Temperature Highlights
In the contiguous United States, the average winter temperature was 33.2°F (0.6°C), which was 0.2°F (0.1°C) above the 20th century average - yet still ranks as the coolest since 2001. It was the 54th coolest winter since national records began in 1895.
I always thought that global warming meant exactly that, global warming.

So how do we have the coldest winter in six years? I would understand the coldest winter in 3 or 4 years, typical yearly fluctuations could create that, but to go back six years seems a little extreme.

Add to this the recent data that shows a 12 month trend of lower global temperatures and perhaps we are seeing the beginning of the end of the global warming scare.

One year or one winter may not be a trend, but it certainly could be the start of a trend.

BTW by most accounts 1998 was the hottest year on record. So not only have we gone nearly a decade without beating the record for hottest year, but we are starting to see downward temperature trends. This can?t not be good for the people who believe in GW.

BTW 2 if GW turns out to be a big mistake does Gore have to give back his Nobel prize?
My suggestion would be the same as Rainsford's. Please go learn the first thing about this subject before posting about it.
 

umbrella39

Lifer
Jun 11, 2004
13,819
1,123
126
Originally posted by: sandorski
Repost and ridiculous conclusion.
But, but, but coldest winter in 6 years? Come on man get with the program. Surely global warming doesn?t exist and is just an Al Gore scheme to get yur moneyz.
 

hellokeith

Golden Member
Nov 12, 2004
1,665
0
0
Originally posted by: eskimospy
Originally posted by: ProfJohn
link
The average temperature across both the contiguous U.S. and the globe during December 2007-February 2008 (climatological boreal winter) was the coolest since 2001, according to scientists at NOAA's National Climatic Data Center in Asheville, N.C. In terms of winter precipitation, Pacific storms bringing heavy precipitation to large parts of the West produced high snowpack that will provide welcome runoff this spring.

U.S. Winter Temperature Highlights
In the contiguous United States, the average winter temperature was 33.2°F (0.6°C), which was 0.2°F (0.1°C) above the 20th century average - yet still ranks as the coolest since 2001. It was the 54th coolest winter since national records began in 1895.
I always thought that global warming meant exactly that, global warming.

So how do we have the coldest winter in six years? I would understand the coldest winter in 3 or 4 years, typical yearly fluctuations could create that, but to go back six years seems a little extreme.

Add to this the recent data that shows a 12 month trend of lower global temperatures and perhaps we are seeing the beginning of the end of the global warming scare.

One year or one winter may not be a trend, but it certainly could be the start of a trend.

BTW by most accounts 1998 was the hottest year on record. So not only have we gone nearly a decade without beating the record for hottest year, but we are starting to see downward temperature trends. This can?t not be good for the people who believe in GW.

BTW 2 if GW turns out to be a big mistake does Gore have to give back his Nobel prize?
My suggestion would be the same as Rainsford's. Please go learn the first thing about this subject before posting about it.
And be sure to pick sources only which support MMGW.. ;)
 

sandorski

No Lifer
Oct 10, 1999
68,488
3,597
126
Originally posted by: hellokeith
Originally posted by: eskimospy
Originally posted by: ProfJohn
link
The average temperature across both the contiguous U.S. and the globe during December 2007-February 2008 (climatological boreal winter) was the coolest since 2001, according to scientists at NOAA's National Climatic Data Center in Asheville, N.C. In terms of winter precipitation, Pacific storms bringing heavy precipitation to large parts of the West produced high snowpack that will provide welcome runoff this spring.

U.S. Winter Temperature Highlights
In the contiguous United States, the average winter temperature was 33.2°F (0.6°C), which was 0.2°F (0.1°C) above the 20th century average - yet still ranks as the coolest since 2001. It was the 54th coolest winter since national records began in 1895.
I always thought that global warming meant exactly that, global warming.

So how do we have the coldest winter in six years? I would understand the coldest winter in 3 or 4 years, typical yearly fluctuations could create that, but to go back six years seems a little extreme.

Add to this the recent data that shows a 12 month trend of lower global temperatures and perhaps we are seeing the beginning of the end of the global warming scare.

One year or one winter may not be a trend, but it certainly could be the start of a trend.

BTW by most accounts 1998 was the hottest year on record. So not only have we gone nearly a decade without beating the record for hottest year, but we are starting to see downward temperature trends. This can?t not be good for the people who believe in GW.

BTW 2 if GW turns out to be a big mistake does Gore have to give back his Nobel prize?
My suggestion would be the same as Rainsford's. Please go learn the first thing about this subject before posting about it.
And be sure to pick sources only which support Science.. ;)
fixed
 

fskimospy

Elite Member
Mar 10, 2006
73,164
24,757
136
Originally posted by: hellokeith

And be sure to pick sources only which support MMGW.. ;)
You're just mad that ProJo stole your thunder by making an ill informed global warming thread filled with a lot of unrelated information and ignorant conclusions.

Don't worry though Keith... I still consider you the most ridiculous global warming troll on here. You'll always be #1 to me!
 

CyberDuck

Senior member
Oct 10, 1999
258
0
0
On my part of the globe (wich by the way gave Gore the Nobel price) this winter was the third warmest in recorded history, 4°C (7.2F) warmer than the average for 1961-1990

The warmest was in 1991/1992, the second warmest in 1924/1925
 

Oric

Senior member
Oct 11, 1999
836
11
81
If this were the coolest winter since 1950 that would be some evidence
 

smashp

Platinum Member
Aug 30, 2003
2,443
0
0
Well it doesnt tak a rocket scientist to realize that the melting Ice caps of the artic are actually lowering the temperatures of the oceans causing the currents to adjust and change which ultimately changes wheather paterns and precipitation patterns.
 

Genx87

Lifer
Apr 8, 2002
41,061
494
126
No surprise. In MN we were off by ~6 degree's in Feb. And I was in Fargo during the winter of 01. I told my friends this is the coldest and longest winter I have had since my last winter at school. In 01 it didnt get above zero in Fargo for almost a straight month.
 

Lemon law

Lifer
Nov 6, 2005
20,984
2
0
I am really getting tired of these global warming doubters that take little evidence and then inflate it into a mountain of doubt. In terms of any scientific credibility, this is the least credible such thread in recent memory.

Some things can be said.

1. Its indisputable that unprecedented things are happening now that have not happened in hundreds of thousands of years. And perhaps the most glaring is the loss of polar ice. The planet is clearly warming and at a rapid rate.

2. Global warming science and the hypothesis that its man made is an ill understood problem. The more we learn the more we discover new factors and interactions extremely hard to predict. Science is not likely to render a clear causal verdict for the foreseeable future.

3. There is no doubt people on both sides are irresponsibly over or under hyping the science. And some of that research is biased by oil and energy companies who pay their researchers to fudge the data. And Al Gore is over hyping the other way to call a spade a spade.

4. What we do now with an imperfect knowledge is the question. We are playing Russian roulette with the climate and can reach irreversible tipping points. ( we are close to some of those tipping points already ) The we don't precisely know gamble is quite frankly to do nothing or to change our technology where it emits far lesser amounts of greenhouse gases.
To a great extent, we must also realize its not a fair money bet and instead is steeply biased. We can afford to do somethings about global warming, even if we later find out its wasted money and effort because the nay sayers were right. Because we know man can live and thrive with the climate we have. But if we do nothing now, we later may stumble on some of those tipping points that can drastically change the climate. And then the survival of man may come into question.
 

Capt Caveman

Lifer
Jan 30, 2005
34,547
651
126
Winter has been warmer than average

Winter has been warmer than average

By Randolph E. Schmid
AP Science Writer / March 13, 2008

WASHINGTON?Winter storms and snow notwithstanding, this winter was still warmer than average worldwide, the government reported Thursday.

The global temperature for meteorological winter -- December, January and February -- averaged 54.38 degrees Fahrenheit, 0.58 degrees warmer than normal for the last century, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration reported.

Temperatures have been rising over recent years, raising concerns about the effects of global warming, generally attributed to human-induced impacts on the atmosphere.

While it was warmer than normal, the just completed winter was the coolest since 2000-2001, which climate experts attributed to the presence of moderate-to-strong La Nina, or cooling of the tropical Pacific Ocean, which can affect conditions around the world.

For the United States, this winter's average temperature was 33.2 degrees, 0.2 degrees above the 20th century average.

NOAA's National Climatic Data Center said winter temperatures were warmer than average from Texas to the Southeast and along the Eastern Seaboard, while cooler-than-average temperatures stretched from much of the upper Midwest to the West Coast.

The agency said the winter was unusual for the above average rain and snowfall in the Southwest, where La Nina usually brings drier-than-average conditions.

For example, in January 170 inches of snow fell at the Alta ski area near Salt Lake City, Utah, more than twice the normal amount for the month, topping the record of 168 inches that fell in 1967.

Mountain snowpack exceeded 150 percent of average in large parts of Colorado, New Mexico, Arizona, and Oregon at the end of February. Spring run-off from the above average snowpack in the West is expected to be beneficial in drought plagued areas.

In the Northeast, February rain and snow helped make the winter the fifth wettest on record for the region. New York had its wettest winter, while Pennsylvania, Connecticut, Vermont, and Colorado to the West, had their second wettest.

Some locations had record winter snow totals including Burlington, Vt., which received 103.2 inches, 6.3 inches above the previous record set during the winter of 1970-71.

Global winter highlights included:

-- Severe winter storms struck southern China; the causes are still under study.

-- Record Northern Hemisphere snow cover extent in January was followed by unusually high temperatures across much of the mid- and high-latitude areas of the Northern Hemisphere in February, reducing the snow cover. By the end of February, snow cover extent was below average in many parts of the hemisphere.

-- February was the 61st warmest in the contiguous U.S. and 15th warmest globally on record.
 

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