New Shuttle SX79R5

Jan 29, 2004
13,684
0
81
#1
http://global.shuttle.com/products/productsDetail?productId=1607

Shuttle SX79R5
i7-3980X
32 GB RAM
2 x 240GB Chronos Deluxe SSDs on Intel RAID0
GTX680 "Superclocked"

Shuttle says it's certified for i7-39xx CPUs and a GTX580 on that 500 watt PSU, and the GTX680 consumes LESS power so...

Tempting to forget about SLI this round and go SFF but is a single GTX 680 good enough for 2560x1600?

One hell of a box for the size.
 

billyb0b

Golden Member
Nov 8, 2009
1,259
0
76
#2
very nice... i've always liked shuttle's products
 

frostedflakes

Diamond Member
Mar 1, 2005
7,929
0
0
#3
That's awesome. Shuttle's always made some nice stuff. Now that mini ITX boards have gotten more affordable and mini ITX case selection is larger, though, seems like fewer people buy barebones cubes these days. Nice to see Shuttle's still around and releasing new products.
 
Jul 6, 2011
14,980
27
126
#4
that heatsink looks cool. i want to see how itll perform
 
Sep 3, 2001
12,250
0
0
#5
really tempted to go SFF, and an X79 offering is pretty amazing, but there are too many things I don't really care for with this design

1. 500W bronze should be enough, but when Silverstone is including 600W units in their higher end Sugo series ITX cases, it kinda sucks that Shuttle cut that corner. There really wouldn't be enough breathing room for a dual GPU card, or even a large GPU like with the 580 (and possibly GK110) as well as having any chance of overclocking the CPU...which brings me to:

2. the cooling solution is pretty clever, but how effective is it? I can't help but doubt its effectiveness on a sixcore SB-E chip. I imagine its good enough, but certainly not for any hefty overclocking. It would be really nice if they instead looked into some sort of custom closed loop water cooling

3. I'm tired of these SFF designs being neutered with the task of finding room for a ROM drive, that space could be used for a radiator for a water cooler I discussed in the previous point :p ROM drives are becoming less and less important and thus their negative impact on a SFF is more and more unappreciated, especially when external USB drives can more than do the job. Why can't these guys design a case without the space for a ROM drive and instead design a matching external for all those chumps who absolutely have to have one? :p

other than that I do love seeing products like this, but if I had to go SFF this round I'd be more inclined to go with something like Silverstones SG08 + ASUS's P8Z77-I Deluxe (which they managed to cram 10-phase power into thanks to a clever riser card) and a heavily overclocked Ivy Bridge chip, as I would be surprised if the CPU can be overclocked much higher than stock/turbo levels on the SX79R5

the GTX680 sounds like it would be a perfect match for a SFF gaming system regardless
 
Last edited:
Jan 29, 2004
13,684
0
81
#6
I won't have a optical drive. I will use my laptop to rip isos to my 64GB Patriot Supersonic.

I think HDDs are obsolete, why would I used optical?
 

Skott

Diamond Member
Oct 4, 2005
5,731
0
76
#7
I won't have a optical drive. I will use my laptop to rip isos to my 64GB Patriot Supersonic.

I think HDDs are obsolete, why would I used optical?
Well, I can't speak for you but some people still use opticals for watching DvD movies, Blue-ray movies, and burning things onto DvDs, etc., Some old pc games still require the disk in the drive. Total War series games come to mind. Not everything is done via digital downloads yet so the need for it is still there obviously. You could argue to get a external drive for stuff like that but then why should a person have to carry that around when it could be inside the box itself. :)



T Yamamoto,
The ICE system is a proven system that works well. In Shuttle's SZ68R5 system people have been able to remove and install a H60 hyrdo cooler. I'd be willing to guess the same could be done with the SX79R5.
 
Last edited:
Jun 23, 2001
27,733
0
0
#8
2. the cooling solution is pretty clever, but how effective is it? I can't help but doubt its effectiveness on a sixcore SB-E chip. I imagine its good enough, but certainly not for any hefty overclocking. It would be really nice if they instead looked into some sort of custom closed loop water cooling
We've been using a number of XPC models for years with my current employer. Most of them use the I.C.E. design, with a heatpipe solution and single exhaust fan over a fairly small heatsink. Its effectiveness varies though, and if the fan dies, these things get very hot very fast.

For reference an i3 2100 in a SH67H3 chassis idles around 55C with the fan on full speed. With only the IGP though, I imagine adding a GTX680 to the mix would add some heat.
 

frostedflakes

Diamond Member
Mar 1, 2005
7,929
0
0
#10
Here's some cooling performance results for the Shuttle SZ68R5.

http://www.motormice.com/reviews/SZ68R5/cooling.htm

Keeps a 2600K pretty cool, about 70C under "full load" (don't think they mention what program they used to load the CPU, Prime95 I'd assume) at stock. The ICE cooler for the SX79R5 appears to be a bit beefier to deal with 130W SB-E, has an extra heatpipe (4 instead of only 3), some fins on the heatsink base to increase heat dissipation a bit, and probably some additional fins on the radiator to increase surface area. Probably plenty to keep SB-E cool at stock, although I wouldn't expect to do any serious overclocking. Between that and the 500W PSU, these cramped Shuttle cases just aren't designed for heavy OCing.

edit: Apparently they were also able to fit a 92mm Asetek closed loop water cooling system in the case and saw a pretty hefty temperature drop compared to the ICE cooler. Neat stuff. Hard to find since Asetek doesn't sell their parts directly to retailers, though. Looks like enough people were contacting them about this cooler that they started listing small quantities on eBay. Price is kind of steep, about $100 after shipping. But this cooler is so perfect for those Shuttle R5 chassis, might be worth it for some people.

http://www.ebay.com/itm/Asetek-545LC-92mm-Performance-Liquid-CPU-Cooler-/280848173373
 
Last edited:
Jan 29, 2004
13,684
0
81
#11
Want one so bad, but I'm torn between SFF and SLI epeen.

That and next generation consoles will make high performance PC gaming relevant again since game complexity is limited by lowest common denominator cross platform development. SLI might matter.
 
Last edited:
Jul 6, 2011
14,980
27
126
#12
go SFF!

itll be a HTPC/SFF/LAN gaming build!
 
Jan 29, 2004
13,684
0
81
#13
Ah screw it I'm going for it. If I get seriously back into PC gaming and decide I need SLI, its only < $400 for the Shuttle box if I change my mind and need a normal case, psu, mobo.
 

God Mode

Platinum Member
Jul 2, 2005
2,903
0
71
#14
Something like this makes more sense with mobile hardware to lower TDP wherever possible.

This thing will be useless for intensive tasks during the warmer months even with air conditioning on. Throttle city.
 

Skott

Diamond Member
Oct 4, 2005
5,731
0
76
#15
Just as a FYI they also have the SZ77R5 listed which is the successor to the SZ68R5. It will run all the upcoming IB cpus. Same box and chasis looks like just different mobo.
 
Jan 29, 2004
13,684
0
81
#16
Plenty of room for cooling. Will not be using 5.25" or 3.5" devices. The only optical drive I need is in my laptop to rip things to my 120MB/sec USB 3.0 thumb drive.

I might look into the Asetek cooler. I'll cut a hole in the side panel and install a fan grill right over the GPU intake for the GTX680 if necessary. It will just suck it in from the side and blow it out the back. The GPU will be a self contained closed system and shouldn't contribute much if any to internal case temps.

Ergo, the entire case volume on the back side of the GPU can be devoted to CPU cooling.

I kind of want to avoid water cooling and SLI and all that for once. I just want a clean simple OEM quality plug and play system this time around. I can't remember the last time I could easily remove or interchange parts in or work on my PC without it taking more than an hour with hoses and crap.
 
Last edited:
Jan 29, 2004
13,684
0
81
#17
Some old pc games still require the disk in the drive.
Not my problem. I will use emulation or crack them where necessary. This is the 21st century. I do not use moving media, period!

Fortunately most older games have been patched by the vendor to remove that requirement. So glad I don't need to dig out my Broodwar or Frozen Throne CDs anymore in the heat of the moment.
 
Last edited:

WildW

Senior member
Oct 3, 2008
986
2
81
evilpicard.com
#18
I'm sorry but this is lazy design from Shuttle. It's basically the same case they've been using for a while, the only new thing is the motherboard, which is fair enough. The front looks nice though.

The side of the case where the GPU goes looks unchanged from the Shuttle I've got, same lousy ventilation, and my cool-running HD5770 used to struggle with heat in there. Anything much hotter will cook itself without some case modification.

I notice that the gallery pictures don't show the internal drive cage in there, and I can see why. They have an AMD graphics card with the PCI-E power connectors sticking up out of the "top" (in this orientation) of the card - which means the drive cage simply can't fit back in there. You might be able to tuck away one or two 2.5" SSDs in there through some ingenious mounting, but no 3.5" or 5.25" drives. The best you can do otherwise is a 10" card with power connectors on the end. I hope I'm wrong but its suspicious that they aren't showing it ;)
 

frostedflakes

Diamond Member
Mar 1, 2005
7,929
0
0
#19
In the review I posted earlier their GTX 570 seemed to run pretty cool while playing BF3 in the SZ68R5, which uses the same chassis I think.



http://www.motormice.com/reviews/SZ68R5/watercooling.htm

Did your 5770 not exhaust out the back? With these cube SFF cases, a card that exhausts out the back is pretty much a necessity IMO, most just don't seem to have nearly enough airflow to effectively get rid of all the heat that a card without a rear exhaust would dump into the case. With a rear exhaust things should stay pretty cool, though. The GPU can pull room temp air in from the ventilation holes on the side of the case (although that's one area I think Shuttle could improve, more vent holes or vent holes more in the center of the side panel to better align with the video card fan would probably be ideal), and then it can exhaust all the warm air from the GPU right out the back instead of dumping it into the case. Then the rear 92mm exhaust fan in the case only has to deal with the heat from the CPU, motherboard, and HDDs instead of dealing with everything the GPU is dumping into the case as well.

Also it's a tight fit but the drive cage fits in with the PCI-E connectors. It would be pretty huge blunder for Shuttle to make you choose between a video card and your 3.5" and 5.25" drives.



http://www.motormice.com/reviews/SZ68R5/settingup.htm
 
Last edited:

WildW

Senior member
Oct 3, 2008
986
2
81
evilpicard.com
#20
Interesting. . . I was looking at my Shuttle and thinking that just maybe the top-mounted PCI-E power connectors could fit, just, with much cable bendage, but I didn't risk it when I chose my card.

The 5770 was not a rear exhausting design, but it was a single-slot cooler and I had the other rear slot open with some ghetto ducting to get some air out. It did always run hotter with the case side on though, and the fan clearly span up faster as if it was struggling for air - like when you put your hand over a case fan and it spins faster.

I run a 560Ti now with a mesh case lid, so it's effectively an open-sided case. I really don't know why Shuttle don't put more ventilation on that side of the case as standard.
 
Jan 29, 2004
13,684
0
81
#21
The mesh sided top cover should be standard. I know they sell one as an optional accessory (zero day DLC anyone?), haven't looked enough to know if it's compatible with the SXnnR5 cases yet.

Like I said if I have to I'll stamp a 120mm or whatever hole in the side and fit a standard case fan grill concentric with the GPU intake. Use a thin ring of pipe or hard foam to seal the cover hole and GPU intake together to ensure the GPU air path is entirely outside air and separate from case circulation.

GTX680 is cooler than a 570/580 so that will help even more.

I may leave the drive cage out completely and just mount a stack of SSDs up flat against the front cover. I like a clean minimalist case interior.
 
Last edited:
Jul 6, 2011
14,980
27
126
#22
You could always cut a few 120 mm holes and add fans
 
Jan 29, 2004
13,684
0
81
#23
You could always cut a few 120 mm holes and add fans
Don't want to go overboard and make it look like a 14 yr old's "modded kustom gamerz komput3r".

I like the sleek minimalist classiness of the Shuttle cases, I don't want to mess it up any more than I have to in order to make it practical. One flat black fan grill or mesh on the side by the GPU intake is probably as far as I will take it. The CPU cooler can be changed without any external modifications.
 
Last edited:
Jul 6, 2011
14,980
27
126
#24
my favorite case at the moment is the source 210, its clean and minimalistic.

i feel the same way about the clean look of the shuttle.

well dont go over board then
 

Skott

Diamond Member
Oct 4, 2005
5,731
0
76
#25
I would agree that a GPU that exhausts out the end would be the ideal for better cooling. I can also see where some ventilation holes on the side near the GPU's fan location could be helpful too intaking cool fresh air.
 
Thread starter Similar threads Forum Replies Date
S Barebones 0

Similar threads



ASK THE COMMUNITY

TRENDING THREADS