• Guest, The rules for the P & N subforum have been updated to prohibit "ad hominem" or personal attacks against other posters. See the full details in the post "Politics and News Rules & Guidelines."

New Modem doesn't have a phone jack

Showtime

Platinum Member
Jun 16, 2002
2,016
0
76
Hi,

I am finally getting around to upgrading my modem. The internet speeds are decent, but there has been some slow downs at times, and I'm hoping a new modem will help make a more consistent connection.

Charter Spectrum modem with phone jack.

Upgrading to a Netgear CM400 modem without a phone jack.

The problem is my old modem has a phone jack, and the new one doesn't. From my research, there seems to be only one solution; that is to split the coax line, and send one to the old modem for phone, and the other to the new modem for data. I read that splitting the line could affect the speeds, and that could defeat the purpose of upgrading to a faster a modem.

Does anyone have any experience setting this up? How did it go, and are there any other options?

TIA!
 

razel

Platinum Member
May 14, 2002
2,337
89
101
Yes, You'll need the help of your ISP. They will need to add your new cable modem to your account as the Internet modem and disable your old modem for Internet, but leave it as your phone modem. You will need a good 2-way coax splitter and the two coax cables after the split have to be the same length. Don't skimp or go cheap. In my experience when the ISP comes out to install, they use great parts for the cable runs/splitter that I often ask for a spares, even ones they have removed from a previous install in their truck/van.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Showtime

Ichinisan

Lifer
Oct 9, 2002
28,298
1,230
136
Would be better to just lose the landline phone. Do you need it?

They might be able to give you an ATA device to put behind your modem.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Showtime

Showtime

Platinum Member
Jun 16, 2002
2,016
0
76
Yes, You'll need the help of your ISP. They will need to add your new cable modem to your account as the Internet modem and disable your old modem for Internet, but leave it as your phone modem. You will need a good 2-way coax splitter and the two coax cables after the split have to be the same length. Don't skimp or go cheap. In my experience when the ISP comes out to install, they use great parts for the cable runs/splitter that I often ask for a spares, even ones they have removed from a previous install in their truck/van.
Thx! That's kinda what I figured, and will give it a go later after business hours.

Would be better to just lose the landline phone. Do you need it?

They might be able to give you an ATA device to put behind your modem.
That may be the next step, but for now, I don't want to change what working for phone and fax.
 

JackMDS

Elite Member
Super Moderator
Oct 25, 1999
29,177
288
126
Are you aware that Cable Internet is Nodes based and their divination in Speed between off time and time when many users sharing the Node. I.e., new Modem might not do any thing for you.




:cool:
 

Ichinisan

Lifer
Oct 9, 2002
28,298
1,230
136
Are you aware that Cable Internet is Nodes based and their divination in Speed between off time and time when many users sharing the Node. I.e., new Modem might not do any thing for you.




:cool:
I'm not sure what you're trying to say. Cable has smaller, more-manageable network segments than most other options.

A DOCSIS3 modem can work with faster packages than a DOCSIS2 modem. Also, having more simultaneous downstream/upstream channels helps with load balancing.
 

XavierMace

Diamond Member
Apr 20, 2013
4,307
449
126
I'm not sure what you're trying to say. Cable has smaller, more-manageable network segments than most other options.

A DOCSIS3 modem can work with faster packages than a DOCSIS2 modem. Also, having more simultaneous downstream/upstream channels helps with load balancing.
He's pointing out that the OP is replacing his modem due to time based slowdowns not for a general speed increase. A new modem won't fix an saturated node.
 

Ichinisan

Lifer
Oct 9, 2002
28,298
1,230
136
He's pointing out that the OP is replacing his modem due to time based slowdowns not for a general speed increase. A new modem won't fix an saturated node.
It's unlikely that Charter Spectrum has over loaded a node. OP didn't say if his performance issues coincide with peak hours.
 

razel

Platinum Member
May 14, 2002
2,337
89
101
I forgot to mention that many Internet cable companies agressively push you to use their combo modem/WiFi router. They do this since it's an additional WiFi modem charge of $10 a month. If the OP is in this situation and plans on staying with cable for awhile, then it's a very wise decision to buy your own.

The only problem is in my experience the modem/WiFi combo they often include has a decent amount of channels. Mine and in 2 other homes use 16 channels. When the average joe wants to buy their own they usually go cheap and buy the 4 or 8 channel which means a greater chance of things getting very slow at very busy times.
 

JackMDS

Elite Member
Super Moderator
Oct 25, 1999
29,177
288
126
It's unlikely that Charter Spectrum has over loaded a node. OP didn't say if his performance issues coincide with peak hours.
One of the tendency that we have online is the psychological, ""l'état, c'est moi""

Between family and business I have Spectrum in two different locations/areas, and FIOs in two others. All under my personal technical care. All four are functioning with the state of the art hardware DOCSIS wise and the like.

Never the less, both Spectrum installs fluctuate grossly during every 24 hours cycle. On the other hand FIOS is grossly stable through the cycle and its Upload is always better than spectrum..


:cool:
 

Ichinisan

Lifer
Oct 9, 2002
28,298
1,230
136
One of the tendency that we have online is the psychological, ""l'état, c'est moi""

Between family and business I have Spectrum in two different locations/areas, and FIOs in two others. All under my personal technical care. All four are functioning with the state of the art hardware DOCSIS wise and the like.

Never the less, both Spectrum installs fluctuate grossly during every 24 hours cycle. On the other hand FIOS is grossly stable through the cycle and its Upload is always better than spectrum..


:cool:
The small cable ISP I work for has had no bandwidth issues since the DOCSIS3 transition many years ago. We don't even use switched digital, so all of our channels are broadcast in parallel. For each node, we probably don't have as many downstreams enabled as Charter and we definitely have fewer upstreams (some areas only have 1 upstream). In this region (and probably all regions), Charter has transitioned to a switched digital system for their TV channels. There should be way more than enough spectrum to dedicate 16 or 32 downstreams per-node. There's no good reason for Charter to have a performance bottleneck.

You might consider that the services you're accessing have increased load during those hours, so the performance bottleneck can be on the remote side.
 

Ichinisan

Lifer
Oct 9, 2002
28,298
1,230
136
At the local thrift store, I got an Arris TM1602A recently for just a few dollars. It has some Charter stickers on it.

I don't need the phone feature, but the modem works great!
 

ASK THE COMMUNITY